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Posted 7/27/2016 11:11am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hello Farm Fans! It's been too long since I've sent some sort of communique from the farm! Brittany has been doing an amazing job writing the CSA email every week, and we have an office assistant helping with weekly office tasks, so I am more likely to find myself in front of 20 buckets of fresh cut flowers than a keyboard!

dahlias

This season we are growing cut flowers for bouquets in addition to the sunflowers and zinnias we reduced the operation to last year. We are growing all of the flowers on landscape fabric, which makes the field look pretty sharp (and minimizes weeding). We are still trying to figure out how to run the operation profitably - we have been timing how many stems we cut per hour, assigning a value to each stem, and trying to consistently produce a $10 bouquet - which is an absolute steal! So much time goes in to cutting and arranging bouquets that we would love to have a core of committed flower customers. With that goal in mind, we have decided to offer a flower share - You pay $90 and get a bouquet each week for 10 weeks. Brittany put together the following points about the benefits of buying your flowers here! There is a sign-up form at the bottom. A flower share is a great treat for yourself or gift for a loved one!

Why fresh, local flowers, grown with organic methods? 

• Fresh Flowers Last Longer.  When you sign up for a share, you will know that your flowers have been recently picked, either the day of the share, or the day before.  Fresh flowers have life and vigor, and can last a whole week long.

• Local Flowers are Grown Ethically.  Lots of flowers sold in retail stores are grown in countries that don't protect worker rights.  The flowers are frequently shipped multiple times around the world.  (Eg. roses grown in Brazil, sold in the US, usually end up in Denmark at the flower exchange first . . . ) 

• Flowers grown with organic methods preserve the integrity of the local environment.  We all know that pesticides and herbicides are devastating waterways and ecosystems, endangering important ecological processes and species - like bees!  Our flowers are right next to some of the Franklin Honey Company Hives that are kept at White Barn Farm, and it's a joy to watch the bees happily working the flowers all day.  Plus, you know when you take the flowers home and take a big sniff, you won't be breathing in any hidden chemicals!

We really hope you choose to celebrate the rest of summer with a flower share.  We love growing and arranging flowers.  We believe that beauty can bring peace of mind and a sense of presence, improving our ability to appreciate each moment and take stock in the simple things that make life enjoyable.  

If you would like to sign up for a flower share, please complete this form. Then bring your check to the farm (payable to White Barn Farm) and we will put your name on the flower share list. Each week (any day) you can come to the farmstand, choose your bouquet, and have the farmstand cashier check your name off for the week.

Details:

Pick up Locations

White Barn Farm
Tuesday to Friday: 10am-6pm or Saturday/Sunday 10am-2pm
458 South St, Wrentham. MA

Upswing Farm
Thursdays from 1pm-6pm
28 South St, Ashland, MA

Cost

$90 for 10 weeks
one bouquet/week

This Saturday, July 30th, we will do a free flower field walk at 10:30am, after Patty's Yoga in the Barn (9am to 10:15am). Take a tour with me (Christy). I will show you our flower fields, how to harvest the best cut flowers, when to dead-head, and talk a little bit about the varieties we grow and our growing methods. The direction of the tour will follow the interests and questions of participants. Tour will be 30 to 45 minutes. Gather at the farmstand at 10:20am and we will take off from there.

Now enough about that.

What is happening at the farmstand?

First of all, thank you so much for shopping!!! We have been getting a great turnout and we can't thank you enough for your dedication to your local veggie farm!

This is your moment to make pickles!! We have a surplus of cucumbers right now, but with the lack of rain, there is likely to be a big slow down soon. This is the week! Get in to the farmstand and fulfill those homemade pickle dreams!!

Kale and Chard are still available this week - but there will be a pause soon before the fall crop comes in - so get those vitamin packed leafy greens in your body while they last!

Arugula and Mustard Mix are back this week! Look in the display fridge for these tasty, tasty greens - arugula with salt, olive oil, and lemon juice, with a few curls of parmigiano is a simple delight. When it's this hot out sometimes these greens are a little spicier - try treating them as an herb - coarsely chop and add them to a grain salad, a sandwich, risotto, etc. They are also wonderful as salad greens, of course. The lettuce plantings keep on coming, too - don't miss out on the season of flavorful lettuce varieties (save the romaine heart 3-pack for the dead of winter!)

There is a solid array of basics at the farmstand - carrots, potatoes, and onions. The flavor and selection of specialty varieties is anything but basic, however. We have beautiful red gold potatoes, cipollini onions that are the sweetest when roasted, and plenty of carrots to keep some color in those toddler diets (or is that just in my house?). I just had a vision of mustard greens, shredded carrot, cucumber half moons, and sunflower seeds with a lemon-tahini dressing. yes please! The onions and even the potatoes can go on the grill if you'd rather keep out of the kitchen! Chris put some whole medium sized potatoes on the higher rack of the grill while he grilled vegetables and chicken breast the other night. They came out like fantastic little baked potatoes. 

Hot Peppers are Here! and the Tomatoes are coming in! Big red slicers are ripening in the high tunnel, cherry tomato pints hit the stand this morning, and delicious determinate tomato varieties are ready in the field - yellow taxi, orange blossom, to name two faves. The tomato harvest is only going to be growing and growing, so prepare to eat tomato sandwiches and caprese salads!! Plenty of basil right now, too! Fresh chopped salsa here we come! There was even a little cilantro on the stand last time I looked.

The first crops from Brittany's Upswing Farm field in Holliston are ready - the hot peppers, sweet peppers, and eggplant are all coming from there! She has been a drought-time hero, bringing water to the peppers and eggplants and our fall brassica planting. 

We have even had some sweet corn at the farmstand! That is not a promise that we will have it when you stop by - but wow did Britt make some delicious tortizzas with salsa, cheese, white onion, green pepper, and corn cut off the cob. wow!

The crew has been persevering without complaint here at the farm. We are soaked with sweat but enjoying every tiny breeze that goes by, harvesting, harvesting, harvesting and trying to keep the farm alive without rain! We appreciate your support! Tell a friend who has never been! It's the height of the season and we have enough veggies for everyone!

 

Posted 7/26/2016 8:39am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hello Everyone,

The drought is real.  We've been running water at the fields at White Barn almost non-stop for about a week.  The sandy soil dries quickly, and needs lots of water to maintain the microbial system that makes nutrients available to our plants and provides water to fill their cells, giving them the strength to stand tall in this oppressive heat.  Irrigation is a blessing.  Sure its time consuming and expensive, but it's better than not having it!

Up at Upswing, we've got a different situation.  Our only water is an outlet of town water that flows at a rate of 5gallons/minute.  A vegetable farm performs at it's best with about 1" of water (rain or otherwise) each week, and for some crops, 2" is ideal.  For one acre that's 27,000 gallons of water, or at a flow rate of 5 gallons/minute, 90 hours of irrigation.  Because we are growing on 4 acres up there, it would be impossible to give that desired amount to our crops each week.  Plus it would be VERY expensive.

Luckily, your farmers aren't completely crazy (although we chose this profession, so you do have to wonder . . .) and we chose mostly crops that can handle hotter, drier condition to grow up there.  Melons, Winter Squash and Sweet Potatoes are all broad-leaf, heat-loving plants that can thrive in reduced moisture, high heat environments.  They love a good inch of rain each week like the rest of them, but even in this drought they are still growing strong.

The peppers, eggplants and fall cabbages/broccoli/brussles need a little help.  We've been filling tanks on a trailer and driving them up hill, connecting them to drip irrigation that lines the beds of the pepper and eggplants and slowly providing a minimal amount of water.  It's enough to encourage a little bit of new growth, and keep the fruits from shriveling up, but we could still use a good soaking of rain.

Today we are trying to pump out of a 275 gallon tank off the back of the pick-up feeding into a garden hose and watering by hand.  It's a lot of work, but it's actually a faster application than the drip system, and we can be doing it in conjunction with he drip system, allowing for an extra 1000 gallons of water or so to be applied.

So your melons might be a little smaller (but will definitely be extra sweet), and your peppers and eggplants somewhat fewer than what we hoped, but we are making it work.  And the rest of the crops at the White Barn Fields are looking great!!  

Everyone think rainy thoughts.  I'm sure your yards and gardens could use a good soaking too!!

Don't forget to sign up for your flower share this week!
For just $90 you can enjoy 10 weeks of exquisite flowers, available for pickup once/week at the farm stand.  A great addition to your CSA Vegetable Share.

Why fresh, local flowers, grown with organic methods? 

• Fresh Flowers Last Longer.  When you sign up for a share, you will know that your flowers have been recently picked, either the day of the share, or the day before.  Fresh flowers have life and vigor, and can last a whole week long.

• Local Flowers are Grown Ethically.  Lots of flowers sold in retail stores are grown in countries that don't protect worker rights.  The flowers are frequently shipped multiple times around the world.  (Eg. roses grown in Brazil, sold in the US, usually end up in Denmark at the flower exchange first . . . ) 

• Flowers grown with organic methods preserve the integrity of the local environment.  We all know that pesticides and herbicides are devastating waterways and ecosystems, endangering important ecological processes and species - like bees!  Our flowers are right next to some of the Franklin Honey Company Hives that are kept at White Barn Farm, and it's a joy to watch the bees happily working the flowers all day.  Plus, you know when you take the flowers home and take a big sniff, you won't be breathing in any hidden chemicals!

We really hope you choose to celebrate the rest of summer with a flower share.  We love growing and arranging flowers.  We believe that beauty can bring peace of mind and a sense of presence, improving our ability to appreciate each moment and take stock in the simple things that make life enjoyable.  

If you would like to sign up for a flower share, please complete this from

Details:

Pick up Locations

White Barn Farm
Tuesdays from 12pm-6pm
458 South St, Wrentham. MA

Upswing Farm
Thursdays from 1pm-6pm
28 South St, Ashland, MA

Cost

$90 for 10 weeks
one bouquet/week

 

Now, onto the CSA Vegetable share this week.

What's in the Share:

Carrots

Onions - The variety this week is Ailsa Craig, and awesome onion you can enjoy in any recipe that calls for onion.  Use extra onion because the sweet, complex, not overly pungent flavor of these onions is so enjoyable!  Store in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 3 weeks!

Cucumber - I know, more cukes - you can do it!  Just eat them like apples!

Potatoes

Kale or Chard - The New York Times loves kale recipes.  Check out this Tuscan Kale Salad recipe.

Lettuce

Basil

The First Green Pepper!  I had sautéed kale and green pepper with BBQ sauce as a part of supper last night and it was pretty awesome. 

Cabbage and/or Kohlrabi- Hot weather is a great time to make a good slaw, cool it down in the fridge and enjoy in the shade!

The First Tomato - Don't worry, there are so, so many more to come.

Garlic - You are spoiled, this might be the best garlic in Massachusetts

 

We hope you enjoy!!

Posted 7/19/2016 7:27pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Well, not only are our fields overflowing with vegetables, they are also overflowering with lovely summer blooms!  Farmer Christy is crafting over 100 unique bouquets each week, with only flowers grown on the farm and we want them to find a special space in your home.  

We are offering special edition flower shares for sale starting next week!
For just $90 you can enjoy 10 weeks of exquisite flowers, available for pickup once/week at the farm stand.  A great addition to your CSA Vegetable Share.

Why fresh, local flowers, grown with organic methods? 

• Fresh Flowers Last Longer.  When you sign up for a share, you will know that your flowers have been recently picked, either the day of the share, or the day before.  Fresh flowers have life and vigor, and can last a whole week long.

• Local Flowers are Grown Ethically.  Lots of flowers sold in retail stores are grown in countries that don't protect worker rights.  The flowers are frequently shipped multiple times around the world.  (Eg. roses grown in Brazil, sold in the US, usually end up in Denmark at the flower exchange first . . . ) 

• Flowers grown with organic methods preserve the integrity of the local environment.  We all know that pesticides and herbicides are devastating waterways and ecosystems, endangering important ecological processes and species - like bees!  Our flowers are right next to some of the Franklin Honey Company Hives that are kept at White Barn Farm, and it's a joy to watch the bees happily working the flowers all day.  Plus, you know when you take the flowers home and take a big sniff, you won't be breathing in any hidden chemicals!

We really hope you choose to celebrate the rest of summer with a flower share.  We love growing and arranging flowers.  We believe that beauty can bring peace of mind and a sense of presence, improving our ability to appreciate each moment and take stock in the simple things that make life enjoyable.  

If you would like to sign up for a flower share, please complete this from

Details:

Pick up Locations

White Barn Farm
Tuesdays from 12pm-6pm
458 South St, Wrentham. MA

Upswing Farm
Thursdays from 1pm-6pm
28 South St, Ashland, MA

Cost

$90 for 10 weeks
one bouquet/week

 

Now, onto the CSA Vegetable share this week.

What's in the Share:

Beets - Still not sure what to do with beets?  How about 31 Recipe ideas from Bon Appetit.

Onions - The variety this week is Ailsa Craig, and awesome onion you can enjoy in any recipe that calls for onion.  Use extra onion because the sweet, complex, not overly pungent flavor of these onions is so enjoyable!  Cut the greens off and store in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 3 weeks!

Cucumber - Have you tried the fridge pickles yet?  So easy . . . if you've already eaten some you can just cut up new cucumbers and put them in the same pickle juice left over from the first batch!

Zucchini - Zucchini bread, anyone?  This recipe looks like a winner.

Potatoes

Kale - The New York Times loves kale recipes.  Check out this Tuscan Kale Salad recipe.

Lettuce - Ever wanted to try grilling romaine lettuce?  Here's how.

Celery - Our celery has great flavor - not overly watery, and would be great with fennel in the 3rd recipes on this site with ideas on what to do with celery.

Fennel - 13 Fennel recipes even a licorice hater will love.

 

We hope you enjoy!!

Posted 7/13/2016 7:12pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hi All,

So sorry for the on this email.  By now, you have all picked up your share and seen what's in it.  And I'm pretty sure you are happy - its an awesome share!  Talk about fresh, beautiful and easy to use!  You're probably snacking on a awesome salad, roasted zucchini and onions right now.  

When planning the CSA share share (i.e., what to grow and when) a lot of different factors come in to play: what can we grow based on our climate and season, what is hard to grow, what is easy to grow, what is popular, what will make a diverse share, what will be interesting, what will be comfortable, what will get people excited about something new . . . its definitely a little bit of an art planning out a CSA.  

And then nature takes its course, and life, with all it's complications, does it's best to let us know that we can plan all we want, but we've also just got to go with the flow.  Lest week we had a more challenging share, with things like radicchio, bok choy and beets.  Challenging for some, not all, but we are well aware that these vegetables appeal to different pallets in different ways.  We try to balance our shares with very popular items and new items each week, but last week just ended up being a cool, try news things, be creative kind of week.

We could have given you potatoes last week, but there just wouldn't have been as many, the carrots would have been smaller and so we chose to hold off . . . we hope you feel it's worth the weight!  Pun intended :)

Here's the share, I'm going to go light on the recipes this week, since I think you can handle this one on your own.

Carrots

New Potatoes

Kale - Try this fresh cool way to enjoy Kale posted a few years back in the NY Times. My mom makes this all the time: Kale Tabbouleh

Arugula

Lettuce

Cucumber - Besides a few slicers there are a bunch of salt and pepper cucumbers in your share. These are very sweet little cukes, great for snacking, but if you want to try something quick and easy, why not do some fridge pickles?  Chris and Christy just slice their's up, put them in jars and cover with Rice Wine Vinegar.  You can enjoy within a half hour, and they will last for a month in the fridge.  

Zucchini 

Fresh Onions

Basil -  Too much?  Try putting your basil bunch onto a glass of water and enjoying as a bouquet before using!  Not sure what to do, here's 34 Basil Recipes to help you use this bunch, probably the last for a while.

Eggplant - The first one of the season!  The plants have all put out one early eggplant, it will be a while before we have more, so enjoy this while you can!  If you think you don't like eggplant, try one of these 10 Ways to Cook Eggplant.

An Awesome Bulb of Fresh Garlic!!!!!  Use a little chopped up in your pickles . . . use a little with everything!  Fresh garlic should be stored on the counter, just like regular garlic and used within two weeks.

Enjoy!

Posted 7/5/2016 12:51pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hello Everyone,

We hope your enjoyed your 4th of July Holiday share!  We've got a really cool share with some pretty unique vegetables this week.  Some you've seen already this year, some might be totally new to you.  I'll try and include a lot of useful tips for using up all these lovely vegetables this week.  I apologize for the late delivery of this email - it was a busy weekend and a long morning, but better late than never!

The Share

Zucchini - One of my favorite ways to use up some of the larger zucchini that come our way during the height of the season is Zucchini Fritters!  It's more work than just slicing and grilling, but these fritters make for an awesome meal on their own!

Cucumber -  You'll all be getting some green and some small yellow cucumbers in your share.  These little yellow cucumbers are called Salt and Pepper and they are some of the tastiest cucumbers you'll ever have.  No recipe needed, just enjoy these little cuties as a sweet snack all on their own!

Beets - Want to get more creative this week?  Try these Beet, Goat Cheese and Honey Tarts!  They are awesome as an appetizer, or even as a small meal of their own.  They are followed by 29 more beet recipes that are a lot of fun to peruse!

Kohlrabi - Still note sure how to use your kohlrabi?  Here's another Kohlrabi 101 lesson!

Mini Onions - Although they are incredibly special and are great grilled and enjoyed on their own, you can just use these little cuties in any recipe that calls for onion!  The greens can be used like scallions too!

Basil - I know, it's a lot of basil now, but just so you know, there is a looming, scary, inescapable disease that affects all basil in New England that is coming our way: downy mildew.  Only recently (in the past few year) has it become so prevalent and predictable.  We grow "resistant" varieties and plant many successions so our basil stays young and healthy, but come August, it's very hard for an organic farmer to keep a basil plant healthy.  So enjoy what you have now, make some pesto and freeze it!  You'll be glad to have it later in the season, or even this winter.  One of my favorite winter foods is a fried egg with pesto on toast.

Lettuce - The lettuce is a little more bitter this week than in previous weeks because of the hot and dry spells we had while it was developing.  Plan on using a creamier dressing, or use in wraps and sandwiches for a little extra flavor.

Radicchio - I'm going to rely on Martha for this one.  Radicchio is a very beautiful Italian green you frequently see in mesclun salad mixes.  Check out these many recipes and see if one strikes your fancy!

Broccoli - This broccoli is the best I have every picked, and in July!  Please enjoy however you like Broccoli.

Bok Choy - No, this is not a special "swiss cheese bok choy"  these heads, although lovely and tender, have been hosts to some flea beetle, a small black spec of an insect that loves tender, leafy brassica greens.  It will not affect the flavor or quality of the bok choy, so not to worry!   Try grilling it, if you haven't yet!

Fennel- Martha to the rescue again.  I can eat a whole head of fennel raw.  It's excellent for your digestive system, but there are lots of other uses.  Check out these 25 ideas!

 

I hope you all enjoy this share.  If do something awesome with your veggies, send us a picture and we might post to our Facebook page to inspire other people in our community to cook creatively with White Barn Farm veggies!

Enjoy!

 

Posted 6/29/2016 3:58pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Well it is hard to believe that June is nearly up! But indeed it is and the fields are starting to show it! The first sunflowers are blooming! We dug our first precious little new potatoes! Fresh onions and peas and carrots are on the farmstand. and that's just the tip of the iceberg!

Two Important Notes:
 
No Jordan Brothers Seafood on Friday, July 1st
 
The farmstand is closed on Sunday, July 3rd
 
cabbage
 
There are all the fixings you need to contribute to a lovely holiday BBQ. Zucchini, fennel, and fresh onions for grilling, Cabbage for cole slaw, Scallions and Basil to jazz up any slaw, marinade, salad dressing, or new potato salad. Don't miss the garlic scapes - the curly-Q flower buds of the garlic plant - they are the garlic du jour. Their season is ending soon, so get that fresh garlic flavor while it lasts. You can even make a garlic scape pesto to preserve them even longer. We just chop up the scapes, put them in olive oil, and add coarsely chopped kale for a great side or pizza topping or omelet ingredient or veggie burrito filling. Make sure to try all the different types of cucumbers we grow. Now is also the time to roast golden and red beets side by side to taste and compare!
 
Don't miss the flower bouquets this week. Our flower field is really beginning to come into its own :)
 
Thanks to all of you for supporting our local business. We are so proud to grow good food for you to eat! 
 
Have a wonderful and delicious holiday!
From the whole team at "Superfarm"
 
 
Posted 6/22/2016 10:56am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hello Everyone! Happy Summer!

We were welcomed into the season with a clap of thunder and a downpour of much needed rain. We'll take it! The last big planting of the season is going in today (Winter Squash at Upswing Farm) and then we will settle into the routine of harvest, weed, and continue with smaller succession plantings to keep a continuous supply of fresh produce coming your way!

For anyone who hasn't noticed, we are open A LOT! 
 
Summer Hours at White Barn Farmstand:
Tuesday through Friday: 10am to 6pm
Saturdays & Sundays: 10am to 2pm
the Seafood Truck is at the farmstand Tuesdays & Fridays: 2pm to 6pm
closed Mondays
 
**** WE WILL BE CLOSED SUNDAY, JULY 3RD *********
so make sure to stock up for your barbecues on Saturday, July 2nd.
 
If you want to experience the fun and fanfare of a bustling farmer's market, find Brittany and Sara selling our produce at the Upswing Farm booth at the Ashland Farmer's Market on Saturdays: 9am to 1pm.
 
There are a couple of new developments at the farmstand - 
We built a mobile cooler to keep the produce even fresher. Our investment last year of getting electricity at the farmstand has given us the opportunity.
We have a new small display refrigerator for eggs and bagged greens. Don't miss them! Make sure to peek inside to see what we have.
 
EGGS
We have altered our delivery routine to restaurants in Providence so that we can rendezvous with Pat's Pastured at the farmer's market they do in Providence and bring back enough eggs to keep up with the demand. We hope to be able to keep up and no longer turn away disappointed shoppers when we are out of eggs! We will also continue to have the fabulous eggs from Birchwold Farm in Wrentham when available.
 
GREENS
The unstoppable team of Brittany with her dedicated direct seeding and our talented crew wielding our new greens harvester is keeping us supplied with salad greens. Right now we have half pound bags of Arugula and also "Tall, Dark, and Handsome Mix," Brittany's custom blend of mustard greens for salad! We are even trying new bags for better presentation. Find these tasty greens in our little fridge (so they stay at top quality). If it appears we are out of something, it is worth asking, because we likely have more to restock with in the big cooler.
 
Summer Crops are coming in! The high tunnel filled with cucumbers seems to be paying off! We added screen to exclude cucumber beetles this year and so far it is working. The plants are also trellised to maximize use of space and allow for nearly perfect fruit, as they hang straight down rather than curling on the ground where they are also more prone to insect damage.
Our earliest planting of zucchini is producing too! For our first planting, we choose varieties that can grow under row cover where pollination is not possible and still set fruit (parthenocarpic). Make sure to try our cool Lebanese variety with the pale green skin, Segev. Everyone knows tomatoes and basil go well together, but don't miss the opportunity to enjoy basil with zucchini! Zucchini and Basil Carbonara
 
HERBS
Basil is available in two forms - bags of basil tips and also plants that are ready to harvest!
Parsley is on, and look for Cilantro to return this week, too.
These herbs are excellent choices for making a delicious slaw with all of the wonderful cabbages that are ready now, too! This is one of my favorite slaw recipes: Thai Style Cabbage with Fresh Herb Dressing
Lavender bundles went out today! These can be dried by hanging upside down out of sunlight to be enjoyed all year. Fresh lavender can be used for making a simple syrup to add to lemonade or fancy cocktails, Lavender flowers have all sorts of culinary uses - butter cookies, ice cream, panna cotta - Foodies get researching!
 
COMPOST DEAL
We have 40 lb bags of McEnroe Organic Compost, $10 per bag or 2 bags for $15. Mega Deal!
Any plants going in will benefit from some compost being mixed into their planting hole. You could also hoe or scratch some compost into the surface of garden beds with perennials before putting a fresh layer of mulch down. Good soil is the key to plant health!
 
Keep Stopping in to see what is available! We appreciate your support so much! Hope to see you soon!
 
 - the "super farm" team
Posted 5/31/2016 11:18am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hello Everyone,  

This hot, then wet weather has all of our vegetables growing like crazy.  The weeds are growing too!  This will be a short email, letting you know what is in the share, and a few recipes, then it’s back to the fields for your farmers!  

We were all of us (Chris, Christy and Brittany) able to take 2 days off this weekend – the first in a while.  A part of our experiment with “Super Farm” is to try and improve our productivity, increase the health of our soil and create more time for our families and ourselves.  A farm cannot be sustainable if its farmers need to sacrifice their well being to keep it running.  There is a strong stereotype that farmers should always be working (probably because they usually are). We are trying our best to work smarter, invest in tools and create systems that will make us more efficient, so we can have a successful farm without burning ourselves out.  

One of the tools we invested in was a greens harvester. Invented by a teenage boy who lives and works on a farm in Kentucky, this tool is powered by a regular drill, and increases our rate of harvest for greens about 10 fold.  We are still working out the kinks, but have been incredibly happy with it so far.   It is not a cheap tool, at $559, but we pay our crew at least $12/hour.  It would take one person about 1 hour to cut 30 pounds of greens with a knife, while the greens harvester can cut the same amount in about 7 minutes.  Over the course of the season we harvest thousands of pounds of greens mixes, and the harvest hours really add up.  

Check out this YouTube video from the website: Greens Harvester  

Special Notes This Week: Eat your lettuce mix first, your head lettuce will last longer. The best way to store vegetables is in a plastic bag at the bottom of your fridge, preferably in the crisper drawers.  Take off twist ties and shake or pat dry with a towel for extended storage.  

Week 2 Share  

Radishes – 19 delicious radish recipes.

Sweet Turnips – Great sliced fresh in a salad, these sweet spring turnips are also great sautéed, roasted and even grilled!  Check out this 101 recipe for Sweet Turnips.

Bok Choy – Bok Choy and Salmon Recipe.  Don’t forget to stop by Jordan Brother’s Seafood truck for some fresh fish to go with your vegetables!

Kohlrabi – We’re going to rely on good ol’ Martha Stewart for a Kohlrabi 101 lesson. What to do with Kohlrabi.  At the bottom of the page there are a few recipes.  Yesterday the crew here at the farm just ate it peeled and sliced with nothing else! It’s tender and sweet.

Swiss Chard – Check out these 21 Recipes for Spring Greens from the Huffington Post. There is one for swiss chard fritters and Broccoli, Swiss Chard, Bean Soup.  I love my chard sautéed in oil with garlic and salt.

Spinach – Want to get fancy with your spinach this week?  You could even combine your spinach and swiss chard to make these awesome Spinach and Cheese Triangles.  

Romaine Lettuce – Caesar Salad.  Sandwiches and burgers, this is some delicious stuff!  Make sure to rinse well.

Bergman’s Green Lettuce – Salad! 

Lettuce Mix – Salad!

Dill – Herbs are one of the greatest joys of a vegetable farm.  Fresh, fragrant and fun, they can liven up any meal. Farmer Brittany made a quick dill dip with last night with 1 cup Greek yogurt, 2 TBSP sour cream, ½ bunch of dill, salt, pepper, finely chopped green garlic, and a tiny bit of hot sauce. Or you can peruse this LONG list of dill recipes: Dill Recipes

Broccoli – 10 Family Friendly Broccoli Recipes

Green Garlic

Don't forget that the farm stand is open!  There will be lots of great products to supplement your share, like locally roasted coffee, honey, maple syrup, fresh fish and if you need them, some extra vegetables!!

Enjoy!

Brittany

Posted 5/12/2016 3:55pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Nothing like a solid week of rain to make you truly rejoice when the sun finally comes out! No moderation for us New Englanders - straight from cold, wet rain and mist to bright, cloudless sunburn weather! 

The plants are rejoicing, too!! The seedlings and seeds we planted in our fields in early April are beginning to come to fruition! (or whatever word you would use for harvestable greens, roots, and stems)

The crops you can really build a meal around* are coming in!
And the salad ingredients still abound, of course!
 
*Kale, Broccoli Raab, Green Garlic, Spinach, Baby Bok Choy,  
and for you Main Course Salad Enthusiasts:
Lettuce Mix, Spring Mix, Arugula, Sunflower Shoots, & Radishes
 
Jordan Brothers Seafood is at the Stand Saturday 10-2.
Iggy's Bread is Back this Week!!!
Sheldonville Roasters Coffee Beans, Franklin Honey, & Maple Syrup, too!

The first two weekends of the farmstand we had lettuce mix, spring mix (aka tender, baby mustard greens - arugula's cousins), arugula, baby spinach, baby bok choy, baby kale, and radishes. Those were all coming out of our high tunnels (that's what we call the unheated greenhouses in which we grow in the ground). Brittany is a master of precision and care when direct seeding and the time she puts into calibrating the seeders for different seeds and recording her work truly pays off with beautiful stands of cutting greens and perfectly formed radishes or baby bok choy (without thinning)!

     Brittany direct seedingfuture carrots

Now we are transitioning our high tunnels into early fruiting crops - cucumbers and tomatoes. Now there are some veggies everyone can relate to!! So the early crops are out of the tunnels and cuke and tomato seedlings are already growing in their places! That means what you are going to see this weekend was grown in our fields, under the cover of Remay. What is Remay? Remay is a name-brand for a spun fabric that allows water and light to go through, but excludes insects and holds field heat in during the cold nights of early spring. This fabric can provide several degrees of frost protection, more or less depending on its thickness.

Crops under RemayCukes in the high tunnel

Because New England weather is so erratic and unpredictable, perhaps even more so as the global temperature rises - introducing more energy to the system, techniques that allow us a little more resilience are what keep us able to produce crops more consistently. Simple, passive technology such as unheated high tunnels and wire hoops with Remay, allow us to push the seasons even earlier and later. (Wait! I thought farming was a seasonal job - our winter break is shrinking!!!)

Please plan your week's meals around some of these wonderful spring vegetables! Search our Recipes page for some great ideas!

Is your garden ready yet? Or are you going to put a few patio containers out this year? Our seedlings are ready to go! Keep in mind the full inventory is not available until next weekend, during our annual Plant Sale. Our working inventory is online. I do not promise it is completely accurate until Plant Sale Eve at Midnight!!

This weekend will be the last weekend for the mini-6 packs of: Sugarsnap Peas

Also last chance for the earliest planting of Broccoli, Mixed Kale, & Lettuce Mix in the less expensive mini 6-pack size ($3)

We have plenty of early cold-hardy flowers in mini 6-packs ($3) to cheer up your yard: Calendula, Bachelor's Buttons, Marigolds, and Alyssum - in white or a purple/white mix.

The regular, larger 6-packs ($5) of a few other cold-hardy flowers are available too: Snapdragons, Chamomile, and Yarrow-Colorado Mix. Plus we will put out 4-packs ($5) of Feverfew-Magic Single, Nasturtiums (lily-pad looking edible leaves and colorful edible flowers) and Borage - a nice blue, star-shaped, edible flower that also attracts pollinators.

Perennial Herbs in 4-inch pots ($4.50) will also be for sale: Beergarten Sage, Lemon Verbena, Greek Oregano, English Thyme, and Mint (spearmint a.k.a. Mojito Magic). 

We will have 4-inch pots ($3) of Basil for sale (even though it is probably not safe to  plant it outdoors yet). and 6-inch pots of extra early, very productive Slicing Tomatoes - bred for intensive greenhouse production but sure to do great in a garden as well. It may be a good idea to let these grow in their pots for another week before planting - just in case of a late frost.

We continue to offer:

  • High Mowing Organic Seeds
  • McEnroe Organic Compost & Potting Soil
  • Neptune's Harvest Fish & Seaweed Fertilizer 

Wrentham's Sohoanno Garden Club is holding their annual Plant Sale this weekend - Saturday from 9-12 in the center of Wrentham. They have all sorts of perennial plants from divisions.

Brittany will be representing her new project in Holliston, Upswing Farm, at the Holliston Business Association's Spring Festival this Saturday, May 14th, from 11am to 5pm. It is on the town green in the center of Holliston. Meet the superest super farmer there is, talk farming, talk veggies, and if you bring a check and sign up for an Upswing CSA Share - free bag of salad greens!! Veggies & Seedlings for Sale at this Spring Festival, too. Tell your friends in that neck of the woods!

We greatly appreciate your support! Thank you for shopping at our farmstand and spread the word - we are now open on Sundays! 10-2.

Posted 5/4/2016 9:12am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

The Farmstand is Officially Open!

Sunday Farmstand has made its debut and is here to stay for the season.

  • The stand is open every weekend in May: Saturdays & Sundays, 10am to 2pm
  • Jordan Brothers Seafood at the stand is on Saturdays in May, 10am to 2pm
  • We still have the farmstand (10-2) amidst our plant sale, May 21 & 22 (10 - 4)
  • Summer Hours begin Tuesday, May 31st: Tuesday thru Friday, 10am to 6pm, and still Saturdays & Sundays, 10am to 2pm
  • With the start of summer hours, May 31st, Jordan Brothers Seafood at the stand switches to Tuesdays & Fridays, 2pm to 6pm

What's for Sale this Weekend?

Lettuce Mix, Spring Mix, Radishes,Baby Bok Choy, Pea Shoots

Baby Bok Choy Brittany harvesting French Breakfast Radishes

 

seeds, seedlings, compost, fish fertilizer, and potting soil (see Plant Sale description below)

additions from our local community: eggs, honey, maple syrup, coffee beans

Our First Non-Perishable Crop! Grown Seed to Seed: Popcorn!!

 popped popcorn jar of popcorn

This Weekend we are selling Edible Ornamental Planters - the kind that could be a great mother's day gift (Mother's Day is Sunday!!)or just a lovely addition to your patio

Quantities are Limited so Email to Reserve your planter, to be picked up at the farm Saturday or Sunday during farmstand hours, 10am to 2pm. Orders will be confirmed by Friday at midnight (but hopefully earlier!). Email info@whitebarnfarm.org and include your name, phone number, which planter(s) you want to reserve and how many of each. If you choose the single herb planter, specify which herb you prefer.

  • We are offering a round terra cotta pot with a Single Perennial Herb that can grow in there all season for $10 (Lavender, Rosemary, Thyme, LemonVerbena, or Sage)                  
    single herb planter
  • We have an Oval Herb Planter (plastic with the terra cotta look) with 3 perennial herbs for $20 (Sage, Rosemary, and Thyme) - I wish it didn't look too crowded with the parsley - it could've been the Simon & Garfunkel Planter!
  • And the Salad Bowl Planter: with Cut-and-Come-Again salad greens, edible flowers, and direct seeded Nasturtiums for $15. These are designed so that when the greens peter out, the edible flowers and herbs will march on and keep looking great.
  •  salad bowl planter    3 herb planter

  plant sale poster

 Plant Sale!

Well, we do already have cold-hardy seedlings for your garden for the next two weekends, but the super-duper Eighth Annual Plant Sale fiesta is going to be held May 21st & 22nd. 10-4 both days, rain or shine. (Hint: we always hold the sale the weekend before Memorial Day weekend - it happens to be later than usual this year). 

  • At the big sale, we unleash all of the frost-sensitive crops. May 21st is the full moon in May, so according to folklore, that should be the end of killing frosts for the season (no guarantees, of course, so keep your eye on the weather report and have your bedsheets ready to protect your plants!).
  • We will have all sorts of tomatoes, including a crazy selection of heirloom varieties, plus eggplants, peppers, hot peppers, cucumbers, zucchini, pumpkins, flowers, herbs (yes! Basil will be unleashed at this sale!), as well as more lettuce, kale, broccoli, etc. Emphasis on the etcetera!!!
  • For your plant-sale-shopping enticement and garden planning pleasure, we always post the inventory on our website. I think it is going to be a "google doc" this year so that we can sort and adjust it more efficiently than on the old dinosaur table available to us on Small Farm Central's website (Yes, SFC, that is a challenge to your tech peeps!!)
  • We sell High Mowing Organic Seeds for direct seeding in the earth or starting in your own cell packs. Available now.
  • Avoid the blue juice! No need for miracle grow when you can use Neptune's Harvest Fish & Seaweed Fertilizer. Neptune's uses the scraps of Gloucester's fishing industry to create a stable fish fertilizer concentrate, now available in pint or quart bottles at the farmstand. Dilute according to the instructions - in a watering can is great - and feed your garden and containers that way. We feed our seedlings with "fish juice" every 7-10 days in the greenhouse (using a backpack sprayer) and always water in our potted up seedlings with fish sauce. A word to the wise: only make the amount you will use. You cannot store diluted fish juice. It is pH balanced until you add water to it - then it will go wicked, wicked stinky if you let it sit. If you have extra at the end of your "fishing" session, find something to dump it out on - perennials in your garden beds or even your grass is fine. Then rinse your watering can so it doesn't get gunked up. This fertilizer is just as immediately available to plants as the blue juice and contains the actual miracle growth properties lent to plants by micronutrients found in the sea. Available now.
  • We carry McEnroe Organic Compost (40lb bag, $10) to amend your soil with. We carry McEnroe Organic Compost-Based Potting Soil (22Qt bag for $15) for seed-starting, filling containers, or using as growing medium in a small raised bed. Available now.

Community Supported Agriculture

 

There are still a few openings in the CSA program at Upswing Farm (pick up at 28 South St., Ashland, MA). You can choose the spring, summer, or fall share, or all three! This is the location where our superfarm collaborator, Brittany Overshiner, is getting Upswing Farm off the ground this year. It is where all the melons, sweet potatoes, peppers, eggplants, and others will be grown for the collaboration this year. Upswing Farm and White Barn Farm are working together to grow and market all of our crops together this year. We like to call it superfarm!

 

 Farmstand CSA Cards  

  Farmstand CSA Card

You can still join our Farmstand Community Supported Agriculture program by loading a debit card to spend at the farmstand whenever you want!

(Exceptions: not for plants at our plant sale and not for seafood).

After May 1st, we still add a 5% bonus to your card to thank you for your early commitment to buy our veggies all season long! (Something to keep in mind: the bonus is 10% from January 1st to May 1st each year).

How to sign up: Fill out the online form, then mail a check to White Barn Farm, P.O. Box 207, Wrentham, MA 02093. (We do not accept credit card payments for the Farmstand CSA cards). Make sure the name entered on the online form is written in the memo if it's not printed on the check. We will send you your card as soon as we process your payment. If you already have a card we can reload it remotely using your name or the last 4 digits of the card number. You can check your balance anytime using the widget found on our website, www.whitebarnfarm.org.