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Posted 9/15/2011 8:30am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hello CSA!

This week in the box you found:

1 pint of cherry tomatoes. i am pretty sure this will be the last you will see of tomatoes in the box this season. indulge in a mourning period if you want to.

1/2 lb of arugula. wash, spin, roughly chop and you have the perfect bed for a roasted beet salad. Chop it more finely and use it more like an herb, including it on sandwiches or with eggs or pasta.

1 quart of tomatillos. The green fruits with the papery husk. Although some people claim to enjoy them raw, I find the true flavor of this fruit is brought out by cooking. One of our CSA members does a very tasty fresh salsa and one of his ingredients is chopped tomatillos. Sunday I made a couple of spicy dipping sauces for the taco bar we had after our kickball game vs. the crew at chez pascal (we won!). Anyway, at some point during the week I had roasted down some tomatillos. My method is to squeeze them all out of their paper into a colander, rinse well, slice them in half into a baking dish, drizzle with a little oil, and bake at 350 or so until the fruits have collapsed and are more of a sagey green color. I like to do these things when I have the oven going anyway - for beets or carrots and potatoes or tomatoes, etc. So to make the sauce I sauteed some garlic, onions, and hungarian hot wax peppers (i really wanted to keep the sauce green). While those were going I pureed the tomatillos and added the puree. When it was all cooked down I let it cool then put it in the blender and then added fresh chopped cilantro, lime juice, and adjusted with salt and pepper. You do not have to use so many blending steps - that's just the track i was on that day. You could make a delicious sauce by just sauteeing onions and garlic (and a hot pepper if you like spicy), adding raw tomatillos, maybe some stock to help it all cook down, and just waiting until it's  all cooked and tasting great. That is a wonderful sauce to make enchiladas with or just serve with grilled pork or chicken. Mario Batali shares a recipe from his babysitter from Acapulco. She boils the tomatillos then throws them in the blender and slow cooks chicken thighs and drumsticks in the sauce. Check it out.

1 bunch of collard greens. While I am on a batali kick how about his recipe for collards that he whipped up on good morning america? You can certainly scale down the recipe a bit and don't worry about not having the kale as well as the collards. Collards and bacon are a match made in heaven. A quick google search of those two words brought up this recipe from Gourmet Magazine. We have to keep you on your toes, everyone! I'm thinking I should include a vegetarian collards recipe so here you go.

2 lbs of mixed beets. you know the drill. if you are a juicing maniac try juicing apples, beets, and ginger. if you've never tried raw beets try a raw shredded veggie salad: carrots and beets. or just roast em and eat em, cause we know that is delicious!

1 lb of shallots. Shallots are a wonderful culinary tool. They are the perfect base for a homemade vinaigrette. These should be fine to store in a basket on your shelf/counter - just not in the sun or where they get too warm. Pickled shallots are a lovely condiment to have available to accompany nice cheeses and/or meats and some good bread (you may have to travel south of the border (of MA) into Providence to find these treasures). For a good PVD foray hit Venda Ravioli on Federal Hill. Seven Stars Bakery on Hope St. or Broadway. and Farmstead Cheese Shop in Wayland Square. Anyway, here is a nice blogger post with a pickled shallot recipe that uses exactly 1 lb of shallots. it's fate . . .

3 lbs of red onions. Of course chopped red onion is the perfect base for a fresh salsa. Red onion rings are quintessential on a burger. They're perfect for a potato salad. But since you got 3 lbs this week what about featuring the kitchen's unsung hero? Red onions caramelize beautifully. Caramelized onions are perfect for cheese sandwiches, accompaniment for steak, a wild mushroom and goat cheese tart, foccacia, pizza, onion dip, etc. Make sure to have a little time to be around in the kitchen for this process. Wear your kids' swimming goggles if you can't stand the thought of crying during the chopping process. My favorite way to prep onions for this is to slice off the stem and root ends, then sit it on a flat side on the cutting board and cut it in half. then it should be easy to remove the peel with your edge already started by your cut. Then I lay the inside of the onion flat on the board and cut into half moons. Good grief! Google has everything. I just googled cutting onions into half moons - here is a visual. and they do it just how I said! Back to the process. Put some olive oil, butter, or better yet, a combo, in a pan and wait for that to melt/heat. Add all of the onions. Do not add salt, which makes them release all of their water and results in more of boiled onions than caramelized. Stir with your wooden spoon occasionally. You can throw in a branch of thyme to add flavor if you want and just remove it when it looks like a random twig in the pan. When they begin to brown, stir more frequently and reduce the heat. You want brown, not black! When they look like caramelized onions, they're done. At this point, add S&P to taste. 

1 bunch parsley. the balancing force for garlic breath. finish every dish with the parsley treatment. It's good for you and looks pretty and adds flavor. Do some clams and linguine with your nice garlic and parsley.

1 bunch cilantro. perfect for a tomatillo creation. or tuna salad. or grilled shrimp, whatever.

1 bunch scallions. chop and enjoy in a salad, quesadilla, pasta, potatoes, eggs, salsa, etc.

1 pint of yummy sweet peppers, 1 carmen sweet pepper, 1 tangerine pimiento pepper, 1 bell pepper. you must be used to these by now. we just snack on the yummys like an apple (don't eat the core). peppers and feta are great friends. yesterday my salad contained almost all shredded carrots, chopped peppers, and feta, with only a hint of torn greens to fool grammie into thinking it was a "normal" salad.

1 head of garlic. enjoy! These are ready to store into the winter in a cool dry spot. Not like you'll be able to not use it, but just so you know.
 
Posted 9/6/2011 5:28pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hi Everyone!

It's a rainy back-to-school kind of day.
Today in your box you have:

1 bag of Arugula. This is the week's salad green. The next lettuce crop is a goner. The week after should be good again. Anyway, let's focus on how delicious arugula is. I find it is best wash, spun, sprinkled with salt and pepper, then the juice of half a lemon, then extra virgin olive oil just before serving. Finish with curls of parmesan shaved off a good block of parmigiano-reggiano. Or finish a pizza or pasta or risotto with arugula, allowing it to wilt in at the last moment.

Bundle of Lemon Basil. Try cooking slices of garlic and lemon peel in olive oil, then throwing in cooked pasta, lemon basil, and goat cheese. Quick and easy. We've also enjoyed lemon basil with fish, boiled potatoes, and even in cocktails.

2 lbs of Cipollini Onions. "Chip-o-leeny" - meaning little onion in Italian. I recommend roasting these pungent little disks. I would cut the larger ones into four wedges and halve the smaller ones. Remove the papery skin, toss with olive oil, salt, and pepper and roast on a baking sheet in a 400 degree oven. When they are tender, try tossing them with a little balsamic vinegar. Allow them to cool a bit and you have a very tasty morsel. Of course, you can use them in any recipe that calls for onions. They'd be great on the grill or in any mixed roast of veggies and/or meats.

2 lbs of yukon gold potatoes. I have been loving warm potato salads lately. The other day i found myself making lunch for the crew and the family and managed to do an almost all veggie lunch - and no one seemed to be hungry at the end. Thank goodness for the filling properties of potatoes. Anyway - here's how it was done: First - scrub, dice, and start boiling the potatoes in salted water - smaller chunks cook faster. Then I did some cipollini onion halves, carrot rounds, and a few whole garlic cloves, tossed with olive oil, S&P, and roasted in the toaster oven. I sliced up a few jimmy nardello, yummy sweet peppers and a red onion and threw those in the big serving bowl. I made a quick dijon, honey, lemon, rice wine vinegar & olive oil vinaigrette right on top of them and let the onions and peppers mellow in there. Once the potatoes were done I drained them well and added them to the peppers and dressing. I had some no longer frozen peas from the mass freezer exodus during the hurricane, so I threw those in - a good way to cool down the taters a bit. Finally, I tossed in the roasted carrots, garlic, and cipollinis. YUM! Everyone was pleased! The week before I did a nice nicoise-type potato salad :) Similar method - diced red onion, capers, garlic, lemon, olive oil, frozen corn, then the hot potatoes. I stirred that til cool then added a celery, mayo, parsley, tuna mix I'd thrown together. delicious and nutritious. And it did not use any bread, which I was out of. Tuna sandwiches are our fall back lunch, so this was a good recovery!

1 Italian Eggplant. Eggplant parm. eggplant parm sandwiches. My aunt did a really simple and lovely side of grilled eggplant dressed with a little olive oil, some torn mint leaves, and a few crumbles of feta the other day.

2 Bell peppers. 2 specialty sweet peppers. these should be familiar by now.

1 Bunch of Red Russian Kale. It's Back! Absence does make the heart grow fonder. and these are such tender little leaves from the new planting. The best way is to use a clove of garlic - slice it, add it to a generous amount of olive oil. Add a pinch of salt get that cooking fairly hot without the garlic browning. Add the coarsely chopped washed kale leaves and serve as a side. or in a quesadilla. on a pizza. on a hot italian sausage sub. on top of creamy polenta with a fried egg on top, finished with parmesan. maybe in a new potato salad . . . 

1 head of garlic. precious garlic! You can roast the whole bulb and squeeze out the roasted cloves to make a wonderful spread for good bread

1 Acorn Squash. the first truly fall food. We figured this cool gloomy day would make you want to turn on your oven. so wash the outside so it doesn't get your cutting board dirty. then cut in half lengthwise, scoop out the seeds with a spoon, and place on a baking sheet. put a pat of butter or drizzle of oil or nothing on top and bake at 350 until fork tender. Scoop out the flesh or just slice the baked squash and let everyone scoop from their own sliver at the table. The skin is delicate enough to be edible - you can decide if you like it or not.  You can also make half moon shaped slices and bake those - they will go much faster, actually. Squash and sage are friends - so I threw in a sprig of sage for all of your boxes. You can either let it dry and use it later or try frying the leaves in hot oil or infusing some sage into brown butter - which would be a wonderful drizzle on top of your cooked squash. Brown butter is just butter cooked until its impurities turn brown, maybe caramelizing? anyway in french it is called Beurre Noisette (Hazelnut) because it brings out a nutty aroma in the butter. That reminds me - toasted nuts would probably be lovely with slices of roasted squash, along with a cheese and the sage brown butter. hmmm.. . . . 

2 ears of sweet corn. Friday members got these on Friday. I hope they were good! We don't use any sprays so there is almost guaranteed to be a worm in every ear. Just snap off the tip and the rest of the ear should be okay. steam it, boil it, or cut it off the cob. you can make a broth with the cobs (and carrot ends, parsley stems, onion peels, garlic peels, peppercorns, whatever) and make a corn and potato chowder. maybe with roasted peppers, sweet onions, and for best flavor - bacon. I loved the wraps from cook's cycles in Nantucket - steamed rice, capers, corn, tuna, and red onion. Can you see where my potato salad idea came from? Al Forno makes an awesome tomato, corn, basil, and red onion salad dressed with balsamic vinaigrette and tossed with freshly grilled croutons.

1 Bunch of Rainbow Carrots. Red, yellow, orange, and white. groovy. 
Posted 9/1/2011 9:32am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Fourteen weeks! you've made it! We've made it! Apologies again for my email hunger strike. Just like electricity, perhaps a short absence makes us appreciate it all the more. Now if only they made solar-powered CSA email writers!!
Happy September! Holy Smokes! Time flies when you are having fun . . . I can't believe all the kids are going to school already. But the cool night air does seem to agree. It's been crispy and dewy morning-sweatshirt weather. Wonderful air all day. The downward shift in temperature, especially overnight temperature, does signal the end of the season for our warm-weather crops. Zucchini and summer squash are about to be mowed, disked, and planted with a cover crop. Our early tomatoes have drip lines removed, stakes out and are likewise about to be covered over with seeds to hold and feed the soil for the future. The peak picking for our main crop of tomatoes was last Monday, but they are still coming in, particularly the cherries, the hardier little red ones and sauce tomatoes. The boys are out tossing the final cantaloupes and watermelons out of the field and into baskets in Big Red, our pickup truck. I think my talents are better used in here! They literally throw and catch the melons. If anyone got a dud of a melon last week, tell us and we'll give you a replacement. Update: Chris just came in and said there are too many melons still ripening in the field. They will not be mowed yet!
Cool weather is not the end of our crops! We still have lots of things in the field: celery root, potatoes, carrots, beets, all types of winter squash, onions, leeks, garlic, turnips, radishes, fennel and the fall planting of greens: kale, collards, chard and spinach, lettuce (if the turkeys don't eat it all!), and our fall broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, cabbage, bok choy, and broccoli raab. No guarantees that every one of these will be a success, but they are growing! So don't despair about the end of the growing season just yet!!! 
Our chickens are doing great! We are getting about a dozen eggs a day! They are the tiny little eggs that beginner hens lay, but delicious and with nearly bright orange yolks! Yesterday's lunch was white barn farm onion, carrot and pepper-embellished leftover chinese food with a fried egg on top. YUM! Very soon you will see these little eggs for sale. We got a winch for Big Red so we can more easily move the coop through the fields daily. They love scratching up grubs and eating weed seeds. The Roosters celebrate loudly every time we arrive with squishy tomatoes and cracked melons. They love the seeds the most and I love to bring them treats! We did have an escapee on Monday. A Plymouth Barred Rock escaped while the coop was being moved (it must have gone over a hump to allow a space for her to get out). So this black and white checked hen was on the loose all day. I made a lame attempt to catch her as she ran off, but she scooted right behind the four buzzing bee hives and into the brambly bushes full of my arch enemy, PI, poison ivy. I thought, "whatever, she'll come back when she hears the rooster announce the arrival of the melons." But she did not! I searched around the old railroad bed behind the field, but couldn't even hear any rustling. She's lucky she didn't get snatched up by a dog, cat, or Red-tail Hawk! She came back to the coop several times throughout the day and Chris tried to catch her but she would head for the woods every time. Finally, Tyler and Chris were able to corner her and scoop her up and throw her back in with her friends. If anyone in the development off of Eastside Road saw an odd black bird, it was our chicken on an adventure!

Now to the point! What was in share fourteen?
3 lbs of yukon gold and dark red norland potatoes. The quickest way to get these babies cooked is to preheat the oven (or toaster oven if you're just doing a few) to 400 degrees, scrub, dice, and put on a baking sheet. Season with salt, pepper, and  whatever other seasoning you are feeling like. Rosemary or thyme are my favorites. Give a generous drizzle of olive oil. Toss with your hands to get them all coated and cook for fifteen minutes, flip with a spatula, and cook for another ten minutes or until fork tender. You may not even need ketchup :) Feel free to roast carrots, chunks of onion, cloves of garlic, etc. along with the taters.
2 lbs of beets - red and white. You should all be familiar with the roasted beet routine by now. One of our favorite roadside stand shoppers and neighbor told me she did a quick pickle with beets the other day. sounds good. She peeled and sliced or diced the beets and sliced onion, put that in a bowl and boiled up a pickling liquid that used white vinegar, mustard seed, cloves, and probably some salt and sugar and poured that over the sliced veggies. Cover that with a lid or plate and wait until it cools. Google quick pickled beets to come up with an exact pickling liquid recipe.
2 lbs of yellow onions I use onions at the beginning of every recipe, it seems. I find them crucial to stir fries, pasta sauce, curries, risotto, soups, fried rice, fresh salsa. Chopped onions are great on a hot dog. Finely diced onions with chopped cilantro, a pinch of salt and a squeeze of lime is perfect with grilled fish - especially in a fish taco. Grilled onions are delicious. So are roasted onions. What about caramelized onions. or onions and mushrooms with a grilled steak. 
2 Carmen sweet pimiento peppers, 5 Jimmy Nardello sweet peppers - the long, skinny, pointy red ones, and a pint of Yummy sweet peppers - the little orange ones. It is a sweet pepper bonanza! Here is a little hint for using these kind of peppers. It is quite an operation trying to remove the core and seeds from the walls of these little guys before slicing them up. With the jimmy nardellos just start at the point and slice rings until you get to the seeds - then either toss the rest or slice the sides off of the core. With the others just hold the stem with one hand to stand it up on the cutting board and then just make straight downward slices around the outside of the pepper. When you're done, you should be holding the core and can toss it straight into the compost. I just added a million recipes from the small farm central recipe database - so check out the website, www.whitebarnfarm.org
a bunch of parsley. great in sauces, breadcrumbs, tuna salad, beet salad, sandwiches. Anywhere you want to add flavor, or just health :)
a head of garlic
 yay! i love our garlic and am proud to share it with you! It is German White garlic with big cloves that are easy to use and extra delicious. These can store at room temperature. You want garlic to be dry and cool.
a pint of mixed yellow and red cherry tomatoes.
use a steak knife to cut these in half and throw on a salad or with a pasta. or just snack on them. The varieties are Hartmann's Yellow Gooseberry and Large Red Cherry, with a chance of Green Grape.
tomatoes.
The brownish teardrop one is Japanese Black Trifele. A red one or two. An heirloom - maybe Cherokee Green or Striped German or Brandywine. BLT. Tomato-mayo sandwich. grilled toasts, rubbed with garlic, sprinkled with salt, drizzled with olive oil, then spread with ricotta or goat cheese and finished with sliced tomato and a twist of black pepper. One easy way to enjoy fresh tomatoes is the Caprese salad: sliced buffalo mozzarella (or just good cow mozzarella), with an array of fresh tomato slices on top. salt and pepper. a drizzle of good balsamic vinegar, and a flourish of tasty olive oil. perfect.
2 little heads of lettuce.
 i blame the turkeys for the lack of abundant lettuce. here is one of our crazy crispino lettuces - the little icebergs. and a green leaf. tasty on a burger or sandwich. perfect for an old school salad - grammie was craving lettuce with a slice of tomato and homemade thousand island dressing. She came to the right place!
and a melon.
cantaloupe or watermelon. best to eat those watermelons outside, i say. spit the seeds freely. Don't let this artform be lost to the convenience of modern seedless watermelons! When you're cantaloupe smells ripe, cut it open. or if you see any cracks or depressions. get it open and enjoy. Grammie enjoys her melon with salt. A gourmet serving suggestion is to wrap cubes in prosciutto and serve with toothpicks. I like to just slice it open with a harvest knife in the field and dig in. wash your face with a garden hose, shake dry or use a sleeve. very refined.

we decided to spare you from the eggplant treatment this week. Sorry for the inundation this summer. The plants are just doing great! If you miss our eggplant friends, come talk to us and we'll send you to pick your own!

Keep trucking, CSA team! Use our friend google when you are looking for some new ideas. and don't forget to go to our website and search by ingredient, or just browse! Thank you, thank you, thank you for your support!
 
Posted 8/19/2011 6:59am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hi folks! Just a couple of changes and fun additions to the farmstand this weekend.

First, Floyd from Burnshirt farm in Barre, Ma can not make the stand on saturday.  He has rescheduled to today friday August 19th 3-7.  Floyd will be fully stocked with pasture raised pork, beef, and whole chickens from his farm.  Sorry for the inconvenience.  

As always Jordan brothers seafood will be set up the farmstand today and every friday, selling the freshest locally caught seafood around.

On saturday Aug 20th a frequent farmstand customer, and t-shirt entrepreneur JEFF T. will be selling his signature white barn farm t-shirts, along with his other original designs.  Jeff's t-shirts are a supersoft cotton polyester blend made in the U.S. and then personally designed by Jeff.

As always, Saturday farmstand will be stocked with T's greens special lettuce mix and sprouts.

And finally, VEG out with YOGA. My mother Patty Kantlehner will be teaching yoga in the barn tonight.  Yoga class is 5:30 to 6:45.  Bring your own mat and water, the cost is ten dollars.  Namaste.

Thanks for all the support, and we look forward to seeing everyone this weekend.

Chris at white barn farm 

p.s.  tomato time is on!  we have lots of tomatoes at the farmstand: heirlooms, slicers, cherry tomatoes, and sauce tomatoes.  What a lovely time for a tomato salad. 
Posted 8/18/2011 9:09pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hello everyone! I apologize for not sending an email last week. I just couldn't quite make it happen. We have been very busy trying to get all of our onion crop out of the field and properly drying in the greenhouse. The downpours have made that slightly stressful. And the weeds are just bonkers. I get some satisfaction from flail mowing them, but I know that thousands of viable weed-seeds are intact and falling onto the earth. We have moved the chickens over a mowed weed hideout. They are scratching and eating the seeds and doing a great job. Today I collected three tiny eggs from the chicken coop!! The first eggs! What a hoot! I did feel dreadful when the hens came in, beaks agape, wondering where their eggs had gone and searched around the coop to see if they had moved. I tried to explain that I am going to take them, but the beaks stayed agape.
Thank you for all being part of our CSA! We hope you are enjoying the food! Apologies if the energy level on the email is down. I encourage you to browse and search by ingredient on our recipe section of the website. We'll keep doing our best!

1 Bunch of White Beets with tops. Just another type of beet for you to try. The tops are on, too, if you are beginning to crave cooked greens again.

1 pint of Juliet Tomatoes. These are a nice small plum tomato that have a truly tomato-y flavor, rather than  all sweetness, like a cherry tomato. This makes them wonderful for cooking or drying or roasting, although many people report they are great diced into a salad. I think they’d do great diced for a fresh salsa, as well.

4 slicing tomatoes. It's nice to have a few slicers around to put in a sandwich, a BLT, on a bagel with cream cheese, etc.

1 Zucchini. These should be familiar by now. If this week’s selection is large for your taste, consider shredding it for fritters or baking in a bread or muffins. 2 Summer Squash

1 Patty Pan Squash. These are the scalloped little summer squash. They are slightly firmer than regular summer squash, “meatier” you might say, and quite delicious. They can be prepared just like summer squash and zucchini. Just slice or dice or cut into big chunks.  Then marinate and grill, roast, sautee, or stir-fry.

3 Asian Eggplant. Chris sautéed onions, carrots, green peppers, and slices of asian eggplant then made a wonderful yellow curry with coconut milk. Any sort of stir-fry is another great way to use the Asian eggplant. You can also roast it right alongside the Italian eggplants.

2 Italian Eggplants: Rosa Bianca and/or Beatrice (lavender skinned). You can make fried eggplant and freeze the slices to make eggplant parm with during the winter. I found that just dicing and roasting on a baking sheet made the vegetables disappear instantly. You could also do some baba ghanouj, eggplant rollatini, grilled eggplant, you name it.


3 Slicing Cucumbers. I made a delicious dip the other day just smashing and finely dicing a big clove of garlic, salting it and squeezing lemon juice on it, then shredding a peeled cucumber and throwing that in, mixing with sour cream and/or yogurt then finishing with fresh chopped herbs - dill or basil or mint or parsley or any combo. It was great on tortilla chips or with slices of peppers or carrot sticks. If you end up making baba ghanouj or if you have hummus around, try dipping spears of cucumber for a crunchy, refreshing alternative to chips or bready stuff.

2 Lbs Yellow Onions. the key to every dish.

2 Heads Lettuce. Finally! the lettuce is back! Weather favorable for lettuce growth and germination is back, too. Enjoy those cool nights, crunchy lettuce. And curse those darn turkeys raising their fourteen teenage turkeys for eating all of the Romaine!

2 Jimmy Nardello Sweet Peppers. These long sweet peppers look kind of like a fat cayenne pepper, but they are actually one of the sweetest peppers around. They will continue to ripen to red if you leave them out on the counter.

1 Yummy Sweet Pepper. This point little orange pepper may remind you of a habanero pepper, but it is actually a little sweet pepper. Very tasty, as its name suggests.

2 Green Peppers. still coming. from now on we hope to be providing you with ripened sweet peppers. They do a great job in curry, I'll say. 

Handful of Tomatillos. These papery husked green-tomato-looking vegetables make a wonderful green salsa. You can either do a chip-dipping sort of salsa or a sauce for enchiladas or just grilled chicken or fish. Either way I would cook the tomatillos to bring out their rich flavor. You remove the papery husk, rinse them, and then slice or dice or halve and either roast until softened and just tinging brown or throw in the sautee pan. Tomatillos always like to be with onions, garlic, and jalapenos. A fresh salsa is nicely finished with fresh cilantro. If I'm making a sauce I like to richen the sauce with chicken broth (or veggie) and use the hand blender to smooth it out a bit.

Hope that helps you navigate this week's share.
thank you!
christy and chris, white barn farmers 

Posted 8/18/2011 9:09pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hello everyone! I apologize for not sending an email last week. I just couldn't quite make it happen. We have been very busy trying to get all of our onion crop out of the field and properly drying in the greenhouse. The downpours have made that slightly stressful. And the weeds are just bonkers. I get some satisfaction from flail mowing them, but I know that thousands of viable weed-seeds are intact and falling onto the earth. We have moved the chickens over a mowed weed hideout. They are scratching and eating the seeds and doing a great job. Today I collected three tiny eggs from the chicken coop!! The first eggs! What a hoot! I did feel dreadful when the hens came in, beaks agape, wondering where their eggs had gone and searched around the coop to see if they had moved. I tried to explain that I am going to take them, but the beaks stayed agape.
Thank you for all being part of our CSA! We hope you are enjoying the food! Apologies if the energy level on the email is down. I encourage you to browse and search by ingredient on our recipe section of the website. We'll keep doing our best!

1 Bunch of White Beets with tops. Just another type of beet for you to try. The tops are on, too, if you are beginning to crave cooked greens again.

1 pint of Juliet Tomatoes. These are a nice small plum tomato that have a truly tomato-y flavor, rather than  all sweetness, like a cherry tomato. This makes them wonderful for cooking or drying or roasting, although many people report they are great diced into a salad. I think they’d do great diced for a fresh salsa, as well.

4 slicing tomatoes. It's nice to have a few slicers around to put in a sandwich, a BLT, on a bagel with cream cheese, etc.

1 Zucchini. These should be familiar by now. If this week’s selection is large for your taste, consider shredding it for fritters or baking in a bread or muffins. 2 Summer Squash

1 Patty Pan Squash. These are the scalloped little summer squash. They are slightly firmer than regular summer squash, “meatier” you might say, and quite delicious. They can be prepared just like summer squash and zucchini. Just slice or dice or cut into big chunks.  Then marinate and grill, roast, sautee, or stir-fry.

3 Asian Eggplant. Chris sautéed onions, carrots, green peppers, and slices of asian eggplant then made a wonderful yellow curry with coconut milk. Any sort of stir-fry is another great way to use the Asian eggplant. You can also roast it right alongside the Italian eggplants.

2 Italian Eggplants: Rosa Bianca and/or Beatrice (lavender skinned). You can make fried eggplant and freeze the slices to make eggplant parm with during the winter. I found that just dicing and roasting on a baking sheet made the vegetables disappear instantly. You could also do some baba ghanouj, eggplant rollatini, grilled eggplant, you name it.


3 Slicing Cucumbers. I made a delicious dip the other day just smashing and finely dicing a big clove of garlic, salting it and squeezing lemon juice on it, then shredding a peeled cucumber and throwing that in, mixing with sour cream and/or yogurt then finishing with fresh chopped herbs - dill or basil or mint or parsley or any combo. It was great on tortilla chips or with slices of peppers or carrot sticks. If you end up making baba ghanouj or if you have hummus around, try dipping spears of cucumber for a crunchy, refreshing alternative to chips or bready stuff.

2 Lbs Yellow Onions. the key to every dish.

2 Heads Lettuce. Finally! the lettuce is back! Weather favorable for lettuce growth and germination is back, too. Enjoy those cool nights, crunchy lettuce. And curse those darn turkeys raising their fourteen teenage turkeys for eating all of the Romaine!

2 Jimmy Nardello Sweet Peppers. These long sweet peppers look kind of like a fat cayenne pepper, but they are actually one of the sweetest peppers around. They will continue to ripen to red if you leave them out on the counter.

1 Yummy Sweet Pepper. This point little orange pepper may remind you of a habanero pepper, but it is actually a little sweet pepper. Very tasty, as its name suggests.

2 Green Peppers. still coming. from now on we hope to be providing you with ripened sweet peppers. They do a great job in curry, I'll say. 

Handful of Tomatillos. These papery husked green-tomato-looking vegetables make a wonderful green salsa. You can either do a chip-dipping sort of salsa or a sauce for enchiladas or just grilled chicken or fish. Either way I would cook the tomatillos to bring out their rich flavor. You remove the papery husk, rinse them, and then slice or dice or halve and either roast until softened and just tinging brown or throw in the sautee pan. Tomatillos always like to be with onions, garlic, and jalapenos. A fresh salsa is nicely finished with fresh cilantro. If I'm making a sauce I like to richen the sauce with chicken broth (or veggie) and use the hand blender to smooth it out a bit.

Hope that helps you navigate this week's share.
thank you!
christy and chris, white barn farmers 

Posted 8/4/2011 10:58am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
It's going to be a big day for White Barn Farm tomorrow, Friday August 5th, 2011.
The latest check of weather.com says it is the only day in the forecast with no isolated T-storms predicted. We'll take it!

MOVIE. We are showing our first open-to-the public film on the barn at 8pm!!! The Greenhorns Film is about young people with non-farming backgrounds starting farms. It will be more of a solution to the problem, uplifting and inspiring movie, rather than a doom-announcing film like Food, Inc. (Although I do recommend watching that movie, too, if you eat food).

The sun officially sets at 8pm, so while we are waiting for the darkness to set in, Tyler Harris of T's Greens will get us going w/ some live music. Whole Foods is donating drinks and a granola creation station. Sheldonville Roasters will be here with coffee and iced coffee for sale. and with any luck we'll be popping popcorn and serving Meg Tobin's marvelous handheld fruit pies. There will be White Barn Farm pint glasses for sale. and MV Bleach, a local farmstand shopper with a T-shirt company startup will be here selling T-shirts, including a hilarious one just for White Barn Farm devotees. Hope I'm not forgetting anything . . . .

Park at the Roadside Stand and carefully cross the street. Bring your blankets, chairs, coolers, snacks, bug spray, etc. Tickets cost $6. You can reserve them online at Brown Paper Tickets. or buy them sans processing fee at the Roadside Stand or at "the door."  All proceeds benefit White Barn Farm.

YOGA. is Friday evening, too. 5:30 - 6:45. It will be held in the barn again this week, since we will be setting up for the film in the outdoor spot. Great turnout last week. Thanks for coming!

FISH. Jordan Brothers Seafood at the Stand Friday 3-7pm. Everyone seems to know that!

MEAT. This Saturday Floyd will be at the Stand 10am to 2pm with pastured pork and grass-fed beef. Stock that freezer. 

a note:
We can reuse perfectly dry, clean pint and quart containers (the little green paper boxes the cherry tomatoes come in).
We will also accept paper egg cartons, mason jars (not any jars - just ones to can with), and flower vases. if you have too many of any of those.
While I'm at it, we would also accept unwanted wheelbarrows - even if the bucket is broken. It's time to make more flatbed wheelbarrows. 
Posted 8/4/2011 10:33am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hello CSA!
Hope the summer is rolling along nicely for you. This is such a summery summer, if I do say so myself. The leafy greens are done for a month or so. Lettuce should be back in a couple weeks, if those darn turkeys keep their beaks off!!! For now, try to imagine the non-lettuce salads. Tomato, Basil, Mozzarella w/ balsamic vinaigrette; Cucumber, Tomato, Feta, Olives; Roasted Beet & Goat cheese w/ red onion, parsley; shaved marinated zucchini & summer squash w/ herbs and lemon vinaigrette; etcetera.

Martha Stewart (my secret idol) just published a "Special Issue" Everyday Food. $5 in the grocery checkout lane. A fabulous resource for easy, simple recipes for just the kind of veg you are finding in your boxes at this time of year.

Eggplant. If you haven't grilled it yet, try that. Everyday Food gives three recipes for Roasted Eggplant Salads. Here is the Basic Roasted Eggplant Recipe w/ Three Eggplant Salad Ideas

Potatoes. Yum. Boil, drain when fork tender - don't let them disintegrate in the water, drain, and serve w/ butter and salt and pepper. or mix w/ sour cream and herbs. or serve w/ lemon juice, olive oil, and herbs. or allow them to cool and make a potato salad. or roast them along w/ some carrots on a sheet pan w/ olive oil, s&p.

2 zucchini, 1 summer squash, 1 patty pan. The scalloped, flying-saucer looking squash is just a different shaped summer squash. I find them especially delicious, grilled or sauteed or roasted. We often get asked if you have to peel them and the answer is no. just treat them like you would a zucchini. I believe all Ratatouille ingredients are in your box this week!

1 bunch of basil. keep it in a plastic bag in the fridge and it should be fine. to preserve the leaves you can pack the dry leaves (plucked off the stems) into a small jar and cover w/ olive oil. You can leave it right next to your stove for easy seasoning. just make sure there are no leaves above the surface - top off w/ olive oil if you need to. when the leaves are gone you can use the oil for cooking or salad dressing or potato salad or whatnot and it will have a slight essence of basil.

2 Bell Peppers. these offer great crunch to leafy salads, potato salads, and pasta salads. They also belong in Ratatouille. You could stuff them, but maybe it would be more worth it when more peppers are rolling in. Although these are quite large - perhaps you could serve 1/2 a pepper per person for a family of four.

1 Bunch of cilantro. fresh salsa! a little chopped red onion and hot pepper, seasoned w/ salt and pepper and the juice of a lime, finished w/ a  chopped tomato and chopped cilantro. You can also do fruit salsas w/ this method - mango or peach. Tequila-lime-cilantro is a popular marinade for grilled shrimp and I bet it would be good w/ chicken, too. You can make a cilantro butter to bake w/ white fish. Cilantro is a wonderful way to finish a curry or a spicy stir-fry. We even stir it into tuna salad for sandwiches.

2 Slicing Cucumbers. These guys may be your salad ingredients this week. Dice and toss w/ sour cream and dill or feta and cottage cheese and olives, or mint and yogurt, or just slice and add vinegar, and a pinch of salt and sugar. cucumber spears are super for dipping, and often overlooked.

1 lb of carrots. Shredded carrot is excellent on leafy salads or in a cole slaw. You can make a carrot salad w/ shredded carrots, golden raisins,
Steamed carrots w/ butter are surprisingly tasty. You can also do glazed carrots. There is a recipe for Honey Glazed Carrots w/ Fresh Mint in the "From Asparagus to Zucchini" Cookbook for CSAs that I recommend to all of you. You could make carrot cake or Morning Glory Muffins. or just make carrot sticks and serve w/ hummus, baba ghanouj, ranch dressing, homemade creamy herb dip, etc.

2 tomatoes. whoopie! the tomatoes are beginning! and the sunflowers are blooming! it really feels like summer!
slice and serve w/ salt and pepper. make a BLT or just tomato and basil mayo sandwiches. grilled cheese and tomato. chopped tomato in a salad. fresh tomato in a simple pasta w/ butter, basil, and parmesan.

hot peppers. remove the seeds to enjoy a less spicy experience. use gloves or plastic sandwich bags fashioned into impromptu mitts when touching the seeds and inside of the hot peppers to prevent getting the capsaicin on your hands then accidentally touching your eye or sensitive skin. make sure to wash the cutting board and knife, too. salsa, marinades, BBQ sauce, chilli, homemade hot sauce, ceviche, pickled hot pepper rings.

Again, hope this email finds you all well. Perhaps we'll see you tomorrow evening at the barn for yoga and/or the showing of the Greenhorns Film on the barn.
Thank you, as always, for your support! 
Posted 7/28/2011 6:16pm by christy raymond.
White Barn Farm Groupies!
the big, exciting news!! 

We are showing

 the Greenhorns film on the barn on Friday August 5th at 8 pm.

It is a documentary about young farmers, often not from farming backgrounds, just up and beginning a farm. Kind of like me and Chris :) We have a projector and speakers and a big canvas sheet. It will be like a drive-in with no cars! Park at the Roadside Stand and carefully cross the road and go left down the hill in front of the barn. Bring your own bug repellent and a beach chair or inflatable couch if you're like Tarah and family. Bring your own movie snacks and a cooler of refreshments, if you like. If you're lucky we will pop up some locally grown popcorn and little Meg will bake a couple batches of handheld fruit pies (doesn't "hand pie" sound like it is a pie containing hands?) So throw in a few bucks in case you want to buy some.  A limited number of White Barn Farm pint glasses will also be on sale for $10 to jump start our "buy-the-farm fund" We have limited ticket sales to 65 tickets, available at Brown Paper Tickets for $6 plus whatever fee they charge. The limited number is so we can all fit in the barn in case it is raining. In that case we will provide chairs. If the weather turns out to be lovely we will definitely be outside and we will increase the tickets available to 100 the day of the event.

By popular demand, you will be able to reserve tickets at the Roadside Stand during our regular hours this week: Tue, Wed, Fri 3pm to 7pm. That way there is no fee.

Stay tuned on the website calendar if we add any bells and whistles. For now, that's the basic info.
 Pass this email along to anyone you think could be interested. Look forward to seeing you there!! 

 

Posted 7/28/2011 5:21pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Summer vegetables are in full force! Tomatoes made their first significant appearance on the farm yesterday. Summer is complete :) and they should be in your boxes soon!

This week's box contained:

1 Italian Eggplant and 1 Asian Eggplant. The Asian eggplant is perfect for slicing up and marinating along with squash, zucchini, and green peppers. You can make a grilled vegetable pasta, cold pasta salad, pizza, grilled sandwich, grain salad, you name it.

1 Green Pepper and 1 Lime-Green Sweet Pepper (a yellow-when-ripe variety named Flavorburst). I normally poo-poo green peppers, claiming that they are not ripe. But they do have their own special characteristics. All House of Pizzas across the US are sure to promote green peppers and onions as a classic 'za topping. slices of green pepper, red onion (you can use scallion slices), feta, and olives are another HOP Greek Salad classic - and it's kind of a treat to make the homemade version with ingredients that are fresh and full of flavor. Cook 'em up with sausages and onions and throw it on a roll. Use it in a homemade tomato sauce.

1 Bunch of Scallions. Your onion again. The real onions are ready to be brought in from the field to cure. Just as soon as we can!!! We've been calling all members of the "panic list" workforce to help us barrel through these challenging days when there is SO much to do.

1 Bunch of Dill. Hurray! my dream come true! Finally, year number three the box contains dill and cucumbers in the same box. In case you weren't aware, cukes and dill are great companions! Dill is also superb for fish or potatoes. You can make a real simple dip using sour cream, garlic powder, and fresh chopped dill. finish with a squeeze of lemon. taste to adjust - maybe w/ salt and pepper. You may also mix sour cream with mayo, cream cheese, yogurt. Go wild! See what happens if you put goat cheese and sour cream in the blender together. get creative. then let me know your top recipe. If you still have a kohlrabi rolling around in your fridge get out the big chef knife and the big cutting board - butcher the skin off of it and make little sticks for dipping in your delicious new dip :) You could also use it in a dijon-lemon-dill vinaigrette. If you are worried about wasting any dill you can hang what's left of the bunch upside down and let it dry in a dry not-too-hot spot out of the sunlight. OR make a compound butter to use on fish in the winter - throw a stick of butter (pre-cut into cubes to be nice to your machine), some zested lemon peel, a pinch of salt, a grind of pepper, and chopped dill in the food processor. When it's smooth it is done and it can be frozen like that. I like to make a little log in parchment paper so you can easily slice off just how many slices you want to throw in a baking dish with fish later.

4 Slicing Cucumbers. Yum! Tzatziki. cucumber salad. I like to keep a bowl of cucumber slices in seasoned rice wine vinegar (along w/ a pinch of salt and pinch of sugar) in the fridge. I bring it out when everyone comes in from the field and is waiting for lunch to be ready. Maybe this is your week to try to make Cold Cucumber Soup. Our website has lots of good cucumber recipes. Just go to the recipes page and type "cucumbers" into the search box.

2 Zucchini and 2 Yellow Squash. Grilled. or try some of the raw salads. or make roll-ups. or just sautee in butter (maybe along with some lemon basil leaves)- but not too crowded or they tend to boil in their own liquid. You want them to sautee and become golden brown. Use a real big pan or do batches.

1 Bunch of Lemon Basil. This herb has been surprising me. I thought I just grew it because of my compulsion to grow variety. But I have found it to be really nice! A couple Fridays ago, Bobby Jordan sent us home with a few packages of fresh Haddock. I rinsed and patted them dry, salt and peppered each side, then placed them in an olive oiled ceramic baking dish. Then I used about 1/3 a stick of butter - melted it in little pan on the stove. Cut some lemon peel off a lemon and chopped it (yellow part only - no white), added that. Then added about a tablespoon of chopped lemon basil and a teaspoon of chopped dill. I poured that over the fish, massaged it on to make sure it was coated, then foil wrapped it and baked at 350 for 20 minutes or so. I removed the foil for the last few minutes. The fish is ready when it is just beginning to flake apart - not when it is totally dried out!
We also use lemon basil in potato salad, in marinades for grilling (herbs, a little vinegar, a little lemon juice and olive oil). Meg Tobin, our flower specialist here at the farm, recommends an easy pasta dish with lemon basil. While your pasta is boiling heat some good olive oil on the stove, throw in lemon basil, some lemon basil, garlic would be good, chilli flakes if you like, then add the pasta once it's cooked and drained and finish with broken up pieces of goat cheese. yum.

2 Hungarian Hot Wax Peppers. These are spicy. They are the pointy lime-green ones. the most common place to see these is pickled rings as an accompaniment to fried calamari. The State of Colorado has created a webpage all about pickling peppers: http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09314.html Anyway, the mix need not be fancy - just salt, water, and vinegar is fine. The peppers themselves have plenty of flavor on their own. We like them as a pizza topping - especially with Barbeque chicken. They are also super on sandwiches - but to tell you the truth they are even better when pickled first. So do a quick pickle.

1 Bunch of Chioggia Beets. This variety is candy-striped inside, you'll notice if you cut cross-sections of it raw. The colors do tend to run together when cooked, however, leaving a pinkish colored cooked beet. Another variety that will not stain your hands, clothes, cutting board, sponge, etc. You can roast them just the same way as ever. or what about beet chocolate cake? There are lots of beet salad recipes on the website, too. To make them last the longest, cut the tops off right at the crown of the beet. You can steam or sautee the greens if you want. then keep the roots in a plastic bag in the fridge and they should stay there, firm and happy for quite some time.

1 Green and 1 Red Head of Romaine lettuce. Our enormous herd of turkeys and turkey adolescents that graze around the farm prefer White Barn Farm Romaine lettuce. The birds do no have much consideration for us farmers. Can't they see the whole bed of lettuce gone straight to seed with the heat? We need that Romaine!! We just eeked out enough to throw in the box. Apologies for any nibbled edges. Hope you have a crunchy salad despite those wild turkeys!