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Posted 11/21/2013 12:13pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hello Fellow Feasters!

It is time to get ready to cook and celebrate and be grateful!

A few things we are thankful for: We are thankful for our incredibly supportive family and our equally supportive and dedicated customers and for the new folks that keep finding us each week.  We are thankful that we have been able to keep our historic family home alive with activity and grounded on open space that grows good, clean food for our neighbors and hosts a wild diversity of plants, insects, and wildlife (not to mention microbes, fungi, and all of our other soil life). We are thankful that we have had a long and fairly well balanced growing season and have been spared major destruction from storms and weather extremes. Most of all we are so grateful that we are able to work as a family (now complete with our little boy and family dog!) for a mission we are passionate about, eating well and enjoying our company while we are at it. Now that is something to feast about!

It is hard to believe this will be our FIFTH Thanksgiving Sale! The first few were held at the Trinity Episcopal Church Hall in the center of town and were our first appearances since the end of the CSA at the end of October. This year we have never really closed - we've just reduced our hours to Friday and Saturday and moved into the barn, so you have all stayed in the local food movement spirit!

Thanksgiving Sale Hours:

Friday 12pm to 6pm (Jordan Brothers Seafood 2pm - 6pm)

Saturday 10am to 4pm (Jordan Brothers Seafood 10am to 1pm)


We expect to have plenty of produce! Certain specialties will be limited but we've got your staples covered.

From White Barn Farm: Gilfeather turnips, Rutabaga, Leeks, Brussels Sprouts, Onions, Parsley, Sage, Thyme, Lettuce, Kale, Winter Radishes, Cabbages, Kohlrabi, Carrots, Beets, Parsnips, Fennel, and more! We also have bunches of popcorn, blue corn, little pumpkins and gourds and ornamental kale to decorate with.

Since you can't have Thanksgiving without some key, traditional items we've brought in:

Cranberries! Organic Cranberries from Cranberry Hill in Plymouth, MA

Butternut Squash and Sweet Potatoes! plus delicious Kabocha Squash from Vanguarden CSA in Dover, MA

New England Pie Pumpkins! Sugar Pumpkins from Buckle Farm in Dighton, MA

Potatoes! Delicious, creamy white potatoes from Powisset Farm in Dover, MA

Apples! Grown using Intergrated Pest Management in Wrentham at Cook's Valley Farm

To liven up the atmosphere on Saturday we will have:

Our beekeepers, from Franklin Honey, with their local, raw honey, lip balms, healing hand cream, wonderful soaps, and more bee products good for your use everyday or perfect for a gift! Saturday 10am to 2pm.

William Raymond from WMR Woodworking with his beautiful reclaimed wood cutting boards and other expertly crafted wood items. Perhaps your cheese and crackers will display on a lovely new board this year! Saturday 10am to 2pm.

Phil Johnson from Sheldonville Roasters. He is our local coffee roaster and the man behind those intoxicating coffee bean aromas when you pick up a bag of beans at the farmstand. Meet the roaster, learn more, and get on his mailing list, if you like. Saturday 10am to 2pm.

Throughout the Weekend, we will have products on hand from our usual collaborators:

We will have Liberty Farm Maple Syrup from Poultney, Vermont and a delectable array of fresh baked breads from Iggy's Bread in Cambridge, MA. On Saturday there will be an extra supply of sticky buns, cranberry pecan mini breads, and French dinner rolls. Iggy's breads freeze fantastically - you can take them straight out of the freezer and put in a 350 degree oven for 25 minutes or so for hot, steamy, delicious bread.

We are doing our best to keep up with your demand for good eggs. We will have both certified organic/certified humane eggs from Puddingstone Organics in Middleboro, MA and eggs from laying hens out on pasture and fed non-GMO grain from Pat's Pastured in East Greenwich, RI

RI Mushroom Co from Middletown, Ri will be supplying us with their assortment of gourmet mushrooms once again this week. Those tasty morsels may be your secret ingredient to a marvelous stuffing.

If you are trying to beat the pureed veggie blues, try out some of these recipes for some textural diversity:

Cabbage Apple Winter Slaw

Roasted Winter Vegetables

Broccoli Slaw

Citrus Beet Salad (feel free to substitute fresh orange or blood orange segments for the mandarin)

Nothing looks quite so fetching as fresh lettuce topped with bright orange shredded carrots and bright pink shredded watermelon radish. Some welcome crunch on Thanksgiving Day . . .


Hope to see you this weekend! Tell a friend if you think they might be interested in sharing some locally grown veggies on their Thanksgiving table this year!

We will be CLOSED right after Thanksgiving, Friday & Saturday November 29 & 30. We plan on being back in action Dec. 6 & 7, again the next weekend, and for the season finale Dec. 20 & 21.

Posted 11/15/2013 10:08am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hi Again Everybody! It's the White Barn Farmers again, writing to promote our farmstand for this week. We are now open in the barn just Fridays and Saturdays if you hadn't heard. We're open Friday 12-6 and Saturday 10-2. Jordan Brothers Seafood truck is here Friday 1-6 and Saturday 10-1.

Last week's news that we were planning on getting a dog generated so much interest that I will give you that update first! Our chicken guard dog is here! Her name is Cider. So far she seems to have a really mellow temperament and is truly cute as a button. She is five months old and is a mixed breed of: Anatolian Shepherd, Akbash, and Great Pyrenees. She grew up with her mom and brothers and sisters at Pat's Pastured in East Greenwich RI. Her mom, Angel, is a guard dog at Pat's so all of the puppies have grown up living with the chickens, in the pasture, within electrified poultry netting. She lives outside and keeps the predators at bay. We built her a straw bale house to sleep in at night and so far she is doing great. 

In other news, we finally got our garlic planted Thursday! This is the sixth time Chris and I have planted garlic together! We had all sorts of good help. The wonderful WBF veteran, Chris Sophie, a new volunteer named Paul who contacted us at the perfect moment, our season-long volunteer from the kitchen of the very cool restaurant, North, in Providence, AND all the way from Portland, Oregon - cousin Ben Henderson!! What a champ! Not to be outdone by her visiting cousin, Hannah Raymond called out of the blue to offer to watch Graham and whoopie! I can send you all this email. My Thanksgiving is already starting!!!!!


The gourmet mushrooms grown by Rhode Island Mushroom Company, were a hit last week, so we are going to offer them again. What a beautiful array. Last week the "chef's mix" included shiitake, maitake, pioppino, golden oyster, and king oyster.


We are happy to report that we still have an ample supply of our storage crops – parsnips, celery root, all types of cabbage, kohlrabi, fennel, winter radishes, rutabaga, turnips and beets. We still have onions and garlic. We will be harvesting fresh herbs, bunches of baby carrots, curly kale, lettuce, spinach, arugula, mustard greens, broccoli and I'm sure I'm leaving out all sorts of things so make sure to come see for yourself!

 

The EGG Situation: We have a limited supply of Puddingstone Organics Eggs from Middleboro, MA and we will have eggs from Pat's Pastured of East Greenwich, RI. His hens are out on pasture, frequently moving to new spots to forage, and are fed non-GMO grain (not certified organic grain, like Puddingstone). Between both sources, we hope to keep up with your demand for good eggs. Pat's is also taking orders for Thanksgiving Turkeys.

We still have a good supply of New England Pie Pumpkins grown by Jim Buckle of Buckle Farm in Dighton, Ma  grown using organic methods. You can roast or steam your pumpkins to make puree for your pumpkin pies, breads, pumpkin rolls with cream cheese frosting, pumkpin whoopie pies, muffins, what have you. Make a bunch at once and freeze it in quantities that your favorite recipe uses (often 2 cups - which fits perfectly in one of those plastic pint containers that those lemon garlic olives from whole foods or 1lb of chicken salad comes in, for example). I recommend breaking down your little pumpkin by first cutting a flat surface on the bottom so it will sit firmly on the cutting board. Then use the dull side of a large chef knife to whack off the stem, then cut it in half. Use a big strong spoon to scrape out the inside. Have the kids sort out the pumkin seeds to roast for a snack if you want. Use a piece of parchment paper to line a baking sheet and place the pumkin halves cut side down to start. Bake at 350 until a fork easily goes through the flesh. Turn them over, sprinkle with a small pinch of kosher salt and continue baking to dry them out a little and get a little caramelizing/browning action on the insides. I use this method for all types of winter squash, varying what I add at the end to jazz up the flavor (think maple, honey, butter and black pepper, toasted nuts, kale,garlic&quinoa, queso fresco&cayenne, curried tofu cubes&spinach, sage brown butter - whatever you feel). You can just crumple up that parchment and throw it out and your baking sheet will clean up easily.

We still have sweet potatoes and butternut squash from Vanguarden CSA in Dover and white potatoes from Powisset Farm in Dover. We've got a good supply of Sheldonville Roasters coffee beans and Franklin Honey's honey. Cook's Valley in West Wrentham has provided apples (they use Integrated Pest Management rather than organic methods).  Our popcorn and ornamental corn look lovely and we have two cookbooks to help you be imaginative with all of this novel and commonplace produce.

Look forward to seeing you all! Tell a friend! Anyone can sign up for our mailing list on any page of our website if they are interested!

Thanks so much!

Chris, Christy and the whole team at White Barn Farm

Posted 11/8/2013 8:42am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

I know, I know. We don't grow those things here*. But we have found excellent sources of all of these wonderful fall ingredients to offer at our farmstand, which is now in the barn just Fridays and Saturdays if you hadn't heard. *We do grow sugar pumpkins, but didn't have many to harvest this year and we do have 25 laying hens, but they've been producing only 3 - 5 eggs a day these short, cold days.

That’s right! More delicious maple syrup from Liberty Farm in Poultney, VT. Our friends, James and Sarah Elworthy have an organic dairy farm and a sugarbush. That is the technical term for a planting of sugar maples that a syrup farmer harvests sap from.  Even if you are staying away from waffles, French toast, and pancakes, a bottle of maple syrup is still an excellent pantry item. It can elevate a salad dressing, make a beautiful glaze,  become a secret ingredient to a marinade or the finishing touch to a soup, and don’t forget maple syrup as a magical cocktail ingredient. At least liven up that fabulously fiber intense bowl of steel-cut oats or your plain organic yogurt. Maple syrup (along with local honey) is our region's sugar.

As we move into the colder months, we start stretching our imaginations to add variety to our menus, and mushrooms are a perfect seasonal ingredient to add to the mix. We have gotten in touch with Mike at Rhode Island Mushroom Company, growers and purveyors of exotic mushrooms.  We are going to try selling a selection of RI mushrooms this weekend at the farmstand.  Let us know what you think!

We are happy with both the quantity and quality of our own storage crops – parsnips, celery root, all types of cabbage, kohlrabi, fennel,  carrots and beets. We still have onions and garlic. We will be harvesting fresh herbs, curly kale, broccoli raab, spinach, swiss chard, arugula, mustard greens, broccoli and I'm sure I'm forgetting lots of things.

Huevos! L'ouefs! Uova! Eier! EGGS! We have a limited supply of Puddingstone Organics Eggs from Middleboro, MA (same reason - cold, short days - less energy for the hens to expend on a daily egg - maybe every other day or two). So we are calling in eggs from Pat's Pastured of East Greenwich, RI. His hens are out on pasture, frequently moving to new spots to forage, and are fed non-GMO grain (not certified organic grain, like Puddingstone). Between both sources, we hope to keep up with your demand for good eggs. They truly are a different food than factory eggs and certainly a huge improvement in terms of humanity and environmental impact. If anyone is looking for a good bird (pronounced in Julia Childs' voice), Pat's is also taking orders for Thanksgiving Turkeys. In other farm news, we are going to be buying a farm dog from Pat's. He has a special breed of guard dog for all of his animals that lives with the hens (or sheep, turkeys, broilers) and protects them from coyotes, hawks, and other predators. This protection allows the hens to be in a large area surrounded by moveable, electrified poultry netting so they can graze for a week or two before being moved. With our current system, we have a small hoop structure covered with netting (the only way to keep the red tail hawks from descending) that follows their coop on wheels. The small size demands that we move it every day or two to provide new ground. Especially at this time of year, we would much rather have them on a larger area and move them less frequently. This way we can have them clean up all of the remaining cabbage leaves in the whole cabbage patch, for example.  And Chris has been dying to get a dog for years, and Graham loves dogs, and we went to see the puppies and they are terribly cute . . . more updates on that to follow.

Bobby Jordan will be rolling in with the seafood truck today at 1pm! Tomorrow the truck will be here 10am to 1pm. Last week we got some crab meat from Jordan Brothers Seafood and made crabcakes for the first time. I just used a box grater and shredded celery root, a small yellow onion, carrot, a fennel bulb, and hard as a rock Iggy’s bread to make bread crumbs. I sprinkled in some garlic powder, salt, a touch of curry powder, black pepper. We added the crab meat, used a beaten egg and a little bit of mayo as a binder, formed patties, then pan fried them in a cast iron pan. Once both sides were browned we put the pan of cakes in a 350 degree oven for twenty minutes or so (I had beets roasting anyway).  The result was fantastic! All of the vegetables brought so much flavor. And what a simple technique. If you haven't experience the quality of seafood he brings, it is time to start!

Just this morning, we had another farmer friend, Jim Buckle (of Brookline's Allandale Farm fame) bring a load of sugar pumpkins to add to our farmstand splendor. Jim has started Buckle Farm in Dighton, Ma and had a great crop of pumpkins, grown using organic methods. You can roast or steam your pumpkins to make puree for your pumpkin pies, breads, pumpkin rolls with cream cheese frosting, pumkpin whoopie pies, muffins, what have you. Make a bunch at once and freeze it in quantities that your favorite recipe uses (often 2 cups - which fits perfectly in one of those plastic pint containers that those lemon garlic olives from whole foods or 1lb of chicken salad comes in, for example).

The sweet potatoes and butternut squash from Vanguarden CSA in Dover were so popular that we bought some more. We also brought in some more white potatoes from Powisset Farm in Dover. We've got a good supply of Sheldonville Roasters coffee beans and Franklin Honey's honey. Cook's Valley in West Wrentham has provided apples (they use Integrated Pest Management rather than organic methods) - try the suncrisp variety if you haven't yet - splendid eating!!! Our popcorn and ornamental corn look lovely and we have two cookbooks to help you be imaginative with all of this novel and commonplace produce.

Look forward to seeing you all! Tell a friend! Anyone can sign up for our mailing list on any page of our website if they are interested!

Thanks so much!

Chris, Christy and the whole team at White Barn Farm

Posted 11/1/2013 8:53pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hi Again Everybody! We blinked and it was November!!! We had our first farmstand in the barn today and it was beautiful!! If you haven't seen it, you must come by. We are now open in the barn:

Fridays 12pm to 6pm (Jordan Brothers Seafood 1 to 6)
Saturdays 10am to 2pm (Jordan Brothers Seafood 10 to 1)
 
We hope to be here every Friday/Saturday through December 21st, with one exception: We will not be open the Friday/Saturday after Thanksgiving, November 29 & 30.

There is parking right in front of the barn. If it looks too busy, there is always parking at the Roadside Stand where we are all summer. In that case, cross 1A very carefully. Do not assume drivers will stop for you! Also, be conscious of our driveway entrance/exit - there is only room for one car to go in or out.

We had a very positive response to the fall produce box. For those of you who purchased a box, here is a list of the veggies in the box and some ideas for preparing them. If you didn't get a box, they are still good tips!

If you need to get fired up to come to the farmstand on Saturday, we will have all of the items in the box for sale plus: Swiss Chard, Lettuce, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Parsnips, Radicchio, Sweet Peppers, Late Tomatoes, Green Tomatoes, Hot Peppers; Napa, Gnome, and Red Cabbage; Pea Tendrils, Spinach, Popcorn, Fresh Herbs; Vanguarden CSA Sweet Potatoes, Winter Squash, and Fingerling Potatoes; Cook's Valley Apples, Powisset Farm Potatoes, Franklin Honey, Sheldonville Roasters Coffee, Iggy's Bread and Pastries, (we sold out of eggs but plan to have them for the rest of the season)

The VEGGIEBOX:

1 Cabbage
Cabbage is crunchy and full of flavor. If you are no longer in the mood for a cole slaw, try cooking the cabbage. If you are still in the mood for a cole slaw, try this killer cole slaw featuring peanut butter and fresh herb dressing.  I need to get the exact recipe from our friends, but they made another cabbage based salad at a dinner party last week and it was really really good. There was shredded cabbage and carrot, 3 packs of ramen noodles (seasoning packets discarded), sunflower seeds, and an apple cider dressing. They called it crack salad, due to its addictive quality and crunchiness, presumably.  If these cold days have you wanting more warm dishes, check out the recipes page and search for cabbage for all sorts of hot recipe ideas for cabbage rolls, soups, strudels, etc.

1 storage Kohlrabi What is that massive green orb? These monsters store beautifully and are reported to be a little sweeter than other kohlrabi. They are a special variety named Kossack and we recommend you treat them like a wheel of cheese, hacking off a hunk to use at a time and then just slicing off the dry part to get to more new, fresh kohlrabi the next time. Cut the hunk into sticks for snacking on raw. It's a marvelous crudite item. Shred on a box grater to add to a green salad or make a quick composed salad of shredded kohlrabi, radishes, and carrots with some sunflower seeds, for example. Kohlrabi is also excellent roasted, on a baking sheet with oil salt and pepper. There's even a recipe for kohlrabi chips.

2 lbs of Beets Beets are so flavorful when roasted. I usually put them in the oven wrapped tightly in a foil package and placed on a baking sheet to catch any spills. Once fork tender (40 mins to an hour or so depending on the size), the top can be sliced off with a paring knife and the skin should slip off easily. I wait til they are cool to do that part. Perhaps leaving them wrapped up once you've tested them and taken them out of the oven makes them steam so the skin is even easier to remove. Of course you can always peel the roots first and then cut into uniform pieces to roast on a baking sheet tossed with oil and salt. Our wonderful employee and friend, Karen Ring, offers some great ideas if you really want to harness the nutritive force of the beet by eating it in its raw form. She made a delicious salad by peeling and then shredding beets in the food processor with the shredding attachment (you could also use a box grater). She mixed in some unsweetened shredded coconut, fresh squeezed orange juice, freshly ground coriander and cumin, a good pinch of Himalayan sea salt, and almond oil. It was sweet and crunchy and had the flavor profile of Indian food, but a really fresh texture.

2 lbs of Celery Root This is the rough, brown-skinned globe-shaped root. It can store for months so don't feel you must use it today. It is wonderful peeled and diced and added to a baking sheet of other root veggies for a dish of roasted roots. My friend, Heather, always slices the different veggies into similarly sized but differently shaped pieces so they can be distinguished more easlly when serving (especially if you have lots of white roots like celery root, potato and parsnips or lots of orange veggies like carrots, sweet potato, and winter squash). Hot tip: if you have already enjoyed the roasted roots as a side - they work great in a chicken or turkey pot pie - just add the shredded chicken or turkey, some gravy, the roasted veg, and bake in a delicious homemade crust). If you want to try something sophisticated to truly highlight the celery root, try it raw in a celery root remoulade or this celery root pecan salad. Another wonderful way to serve celery root is to make mashed potatoes using half potatoes and half celery root - just boil and mash right together, adding butter and warmed half and half and salt and pepper to taste. Try that with braised short ribs and you will be in comfort food heaven. Celery root is a wonderful addition to stews and can make a lovely gratin as well - try alternating layers of thin-sliced potato and celery root. I found a good recipe to use as a guide: root vegetable gratin.

1 bunch of Baby Carrots Cute crunchy snackers. I've heard of using the tops as you would parsley, but frankly I prefer parsley. I would add the rinsed tops to my stockpot, though.

1 bunch of Radishes This tasty variety is named Crunchy Royale. They are large enough to make shredding pretty easy. Otherwise try thin slices on your salad or in a sandwich. You could make a quick pickle to accompany tacos, Tallulah's Taco Truck style. Briefly sauteeing in butter transforms them into a nice side and milds out any spicyness. The French recommend thin slices on top of a slice of buttered baguette, finished with a sprinkle of sea salt. Thin-sliced radishes and coarsely chopped mustard mix make a nice salad, dressed with white balsamic vinaigrette.

1 lb of Onions the base of all recipes

1 bunch of Broccoli Raab The brighter green of the bunched greens in the box. It is naturally very bitter (which translates to excellent tonic for the liver). Therefore it makes a perfect foil to richness and heat. That richness can be olive oil and the heat can be a pinch of crushed red pepper flakes. If you eat meat, the ultimate broccoli raab pairing is a spicy italian sausage. For basic raab preparation see Sauteed Broccoli Raab with Garlic and Olive Oil. To make a main course out of it, add to a pasta with some cheese and toasted walnuts or some Italian sausage, sliced on the bias and seared.  Matt Gennuso at Chez Pascal (one our best chef customers from PVD) often serves broccoli raab on his grilled housemade sausage sandwiches. Deluxe and healthify your tailgating regime . . . 

1 bunch of Kale. Curly Kale. This variety is very hardy in the cold weather and therefore is not quite as tender as the first pickings in spring. I recommend stripping the leaves off of the stems and coarsely chopping them and then more finely chopping the stems. I like to put a generous amount of olive oil in a large sautee pan, add slices of garlic, a pinch of salt, then the stems, then the leaves after the stems are tender. If you feel like your kale is still too tough after cooking it for a bit, feel free to add a liquid to braise the greens a bit - wine, soy sauce, or cider vinegar have all worked for me.

1 Bag of Mustard Mix. Salad! These greens are full of flavor. Chris actually put some coarse chopped mustard greens in a quesadilla with cream cheese. very tasty.

1 head Bok Choy  So fun to say. so delicious to crunch on. I like to cut off the base so that I can wash the bottoms of the stems under running water, rubbing away any dirt (kind of like you clean the dirt off the bottom of celery stems). Then I usually slice the stems across thinly so you have half moons (add these to a stir fry a few minutes earlier) and then just coarsely chop the greens to toss into a stir fry or brothy soup at the very last minute - they will wilt quickly. For a simple side, let's look to our cooking hero and money magnet, Martha Stewart, whose Seasonal Produce Recipe Guide is truly indispensable and should probably be bookmarked by all CSA Members everywhere. Anyway, the simple side is Bok Choy with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger. My aunt turned me on to this salad featuring bok choy and ramen noodles, though several variations exist - don't be afraid to experiment!
 
Posted 10/29/2013 9:12pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hi Again Folks! Thank you so much to everyone who came out for Harvestween at the farm! It was a nice sunny fall day and it seemed everyone enjoyed themselves quite well! We would like to remind you that . . .
 
we move our farmstand into the barn beginning on Friday, November 1st:

Fridays, 12pm to 6pm

Saturdays, 10am to 2pm

Jordan Brothers Seafood Truck: Friday 1pm to 6pm & Saturday 10am to 1pm

But the real point of this message is to offer a one-time fall produce box. We no longer have quite enough quantity and diversity to offer 100 CSA shares per week, but this first week after the CSA we can offer 40 produce boxes to the first 40 respondents. The price is $30 and that is the value that will be in the share. If you have considered joining the CSA in the past, this would be a great way to get a no-strings-attached experience with a White Barn Farm veggie share. The box is likely to contain: 

  • 1 Cabbage
  • 1 storage Kohlrabi
  • 2 lbs of Beets
  • 2 lbs of Celery Root
  • 1 bunch of Baby Carrots
  • 1 bunch of Radishes
  • 1 lb of Onions
  • 1 bunch of Broccoli Raab
  • 1 bunch of Kale
  • 2 heads Lettuce
  • 1 head Bok Choy

Respond to this email (info@whitebarnfarm.org) to reserve your box. Please include your name and phone number. Payment can be made at pick-up by cash, check, or card. We will make a post on the website when all 40 slots are booked. Check the status at www.whitebarnfarm.org before responding. Update: as of 10:15pm Tuesday, October 29th, 8 boxes are still available.

Pick-up will be on Halloween. Thursday, October 31st, 2pm to 6pm at the barn. A real trick or treat!!!! Your box will be all packed for you to snag on your way to the Candy Corn Express. The next morning, you are sure to be devouring the kale raw to counteract your sugar hangover.

Thank you as always for your support!

Chris and Christy at White Barn Farm

Posted 10/24/2013 1:56pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Do you have a ridiculous wig, funny hat, fake moustache, a real clever costume? Please come parade it about this Saturday at our Harvestween Market: At the White Barn Farm Roadside Stand 10am to 2pm. We will have a box of extra costumes if you don't have your own!

We like to go out in style so here's what we've lined up to embellish our Saturday market:

  • Puddingstone Organics Eggs (raised by Farmer Bill in Middleboro, MA)
  • Fresh Seafood from Jordan Brothers Seafood Truck (10 to 1)
  • Iggy's Bread and Pastries
  • Beautiful, Handcrafted Cutting Boards, etc by WMR Woodworking
  • Bake Sale to benefit the 4Paws Animal Shelter
  • Honey and crafty Bee Products from Franklin Honey (meet the beekeepers!)
  • Locally Roasted Coffee Beans from Sheldonville Roasters
  • Handmade Pottery by local artisan Karl Zeigler of Norfolk
  • Crunchy, Delicious Apples from Cook's Valley Farm on West St. in Wrentham
  • A downhome serenade provided by the Ziegler Family Band from 12 to 1
  • Farm Tours on foot lead by Farmers Chris and Christy at 10:15, 11:15, 12:15 and 1:15. If we're lucky, the Farm Wizard, Christy's dad Eliot, may do some Farm Tours on the Model T!
  • Live Demo of our Bike-Powered Barrel Root Washer donated to WBF by Cousin Thom of the Ice Weasels and masterminded by Lou Yoder. If your feet can reach the pedals, you may be qualified to help Farmer Dylan get all those roots squeaky clean!
  • The Sunday Spinners will make an exception and demo the art of spinning wool into yarn on a Saturday!
  • WBF's Veggie Extravaganza continues with more Broccoli & Cauliflower. Our own Popcorn on the Cob for you to dry and pop all winter! Radicchio, Lettuce, Arugula, Mustard Mix. Sweet Peppers. Green, Red, and Gnome Cabbage. High-Tunnel Tomatoes. Onions. Carrots. Beets. Celery Root. Fennel. Bok Choy, Kale, Swiss Chard, Spinach. and more more more!!!!

Now if that was not enough fun, later Saturday 10/26, the Wrentham Sohoanno Garden Club is premiering their Pumpkin Party on the Wrentham Town Common from 4 to 7. From 4 to 5:30, bring your carved pumpkin with a glowstick or battery powered candle. Enjoy snacks and games and a live dance performance at 5:30pm put on by Showcase Dance (Thriller performed by the older kids and Itsy Bitsy Spider by the wee ones).  All the pumpkins will be illuminated for the Pumkin Stroll at 6pm! Local groups or businesses are invited to decorate their own plots. The best one wins a prize! For more info, email sohoannogardenclub@yahoo.com

Posted 10/23/2013 9:28am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

CSA team! That's it. We've made it. Twenty two weeks of seasonal produce. We've got a nice heavy box for you for the last share:

1 head of Radicchio. If this is too bitter for you to feature in a dish, just butcher it how you would a cabbage and include thin sliced strips in your salad mix. If you're feeling gourmet, kill two birds with one stone in this radicchio, fennel, apple, and calvados salad. Pizza is an amazing vehicle for veggies the whole year through. This recipe for a white pizza with radicchio, gorgonzola, and mushrooms includes a good technique for preparing the radicchio in a hot cast iron pan.

1 Bok Choy. See last week's email for bok choy ideas. Onions, fennel, carrots, swiss chard, and bok choy would make a nice stir fry to add to some brown rice and marinated, baked tofu.

1 bunch of Swiss Chard. This is your cooking green for the week. The turnip tops may also be sauteed with garlic and olive oil for a pleasant greens experience. Both taste great with a pat of butter and couple dashes of cider vinegar. Grammie even likes to add a few pinches of sugar. With all of the hearty roots in this week's share, this recipe for golden roots and greens soup sounds perfect.

1 bulb of Fennel. no tops this time. Try adding fennel when you are cooking onions at the base of any soup, sauce, stew, or saute. A few weeks ago I added diced fennel to olive oil and garlic and rosemary until it was all tender and the oil was nicely infused with flavor. I added that to a couple cans of white beans in the food processor to make a tasty white bean spread (just adjust the flavor with lemon juice and salt). It's kind of like an Italian style hummus - great on bread or raw veggie sticks (like kohlrabi, broccoli, carrots, sweet peppers, salad turnips, radishes, etc).

2 Heads of Lettuce

1 bunch of Hakurei turnips - the bunch of roots that look like white radishes. Indeed, they can be treated as radishes, eaten raw or just briefly cooked. These are really nice just sliced thin on your salad.

1 lb of Celery Root. This is the rough, brown-skinned globe-shaped root. It can store for months so don't feel you must use it today. It is wonderful peeled and diced and added to a baking sheet of other root veggies for a dish of roasted roots. My friend, Heather, always slices the different veggies into similarly sized but differently shaped pieces so they can be distinguished more easlly when serving (especially if you have lots of white roots like celery root, potato and parsnips or lots of orange veggies like carrots, sweet potato, and winter squash). Hot tip: if you have already enjoyed the roasted roots as a side - they work great in a chicken or turkey pot pie - just add the shredded chicken or turkey, some gravy, the roasted veg, and bake in a delicious homemade crust). If you want to try something sophisticated to truly highlight the celery root, try it raw in a celery root remoulade or this celery root pecan salad. Another wonderful way to serve celery root is to make mashed potatoes using half potatoes and half celery root - just boil and mash right together, adding butter and warmed half and half and salt and pepper to taste. Try that with braised short ribs and you will be in comfort food heaven. Celery root is a wonderful addition to stews and can make a lovely gratin as well - try alternating layers of thin-sliced potato and celery root. I found a good recipe to use as a guide: root vegetable gratin.

1 lb of Parsnips. the big fat white carrot looking root. Parsnips are best cooked. Parsnips have a high sugar content so they caramelize nicely, but can kind of burn more easily if you try to make deep fried chips or something out of them (too hot). They do roast up nicely and are wonderful in a half potato/half parsnip puree (just like the celery root mashed potato described above). You can also cook them on the stovetop, using orange juice or apple cider to kind of braise them to tenderness. Maybe finish with a dash of maple syrup if you really want to accentuate the inherent sweetness.

2 lbs of Multi-Colored Carrots

1 bunch of Popcorn. Popcorn must be dried in order to properly pop. Since the three cobs are conveniently bunched by their husks, they will hang on a nail very easily. Make sure they are not in a crow, squirrel or chipmunk's domain. I think the bunch looks quite decorative, really. By mid-December and certainly by the New Year, your popcorn should be dried out enough to pop. It is possible to place the cobs in a paper bag with the top folded down and microwave it, but using the stovetop method allows for more flavor to be infused during the cooking process. To pop in a pan requires taking the kernels off of the cob (afterwards store what you aren't using immediately in an airtight jar). Here is a you tube video of Chris telling us how to do it (from his last year at Stearns Farm in 2008). Random aside: Chris and I fell in love talking about all of our dreams and ideas husking popcorn at Stearns Farm when I went there to do a volunteer workday/CSA harvest observation.

Thank you all so so much for taking this ride through Southeastern Massachusetts' seasonal produce possibilities. We hope you have all become familiar with some veggies you may not have otherwise met - moreover we hope you enjoyed them! We feel fresh food tastes delicious and it feels good to know that your farmers never use any pesticides, herbicides or chemical fertilizers. You have certainly enabled us to have a very productive farming season, despite the change in lifestyle afforded by our new son and some challenges provided by pests and disease. Overall, we think it has been a pretty great growing season. We had a pretty even balance of sun and rain and frost has held off until tonight!!

Our son, Graham, will be one year old on Saturday, October 26th. The Saturday following the last CSA pick-up and the last week of Regular Farmstand Hours is traditionally celebrated by our invented holiday, Harvestween. Lucky Graham will get to celebrate his birthday at this community hootenanny.  It is a glorified Saturday Farmstand embellished by talented crafters, apples from Cook's Valley Farm, the 4Paws bake sale, the Jordan Bros Seafood truck, wigs, costumes, and simple fun. We will be giving farm tours, including a demo of our new bike-powered barrel root washer, throughout the day. We do hope you can make it. Feel free to return your waxed box to the farmstand anytime.

Beginning Friday, November 1st we will be holding our farmstand in the barn (through Dec. 21st):

Fridays 12 to 6 (Jordan Bros. 1 to 6)

Saturdays 10 to 2 (Jordan Bros. 10 to 1)

Within a week or two, we will send an email about CSA renewal and possibly a new CSA scheme for 2014. We thank you enormously for your support and wish you a Wonderful Fall!!!

 

 

Posted 10/17/2013 9:51am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

howdy folks! It is the twenty first share of the 2013 growing season at White Barn Farm. It is truly hard to believe . . . Thanks for sticking with us.

This is a tricky and challenging share for your culinary endeavors.

So, you finally figured out how to use kale. Now try BROCCOLI RAAB. it is naturally very bitter (which translates to excellent tonic for the liver). Therefore it makes a perfect foil to richness and heat. That richness can be olive oil and the heat can be a pinch of crushed red pepper flakes. If you eat meat, the ultimate broccoli raab pairing is a spicy italian sausage. For basic raab preparation see Sauteed Broccoli Raab with Garlic and Olive Oil. To make a main course out of it, add to a pasta with some cheese and toasted walnuts or some Italian sausage, sliced on the bias and seared.  Matt Gennuso at Chez Pascal (one our best chef customers from PVD) often serves broccoli raab on his grilled housemade sausage sandwiches. Deluxe and healthify your tailgating regime . . . 

Fennel is another friend of the sausage. Sauteed fennel and onions would be perfect on your sausage in a bun for tailgating, too. Unless you are a true fennel fanatic, you will not want to bite into this bulb like an apple, but slicing or shaving it very thin should render it fabulous in a salad, slaw or side dish. Our recipes page abounds with fennel ideas since it is one of the tougher vegetables to convince grocery shoppers they can use. Type "fennel" into the search recipes box and hit "submit" for the full list of fennel ideas, past and present. Shaved fennel and citrus pair nicely as a composed salad. The fronds can be treated as an herb and may also go into your stockpot. Fennel adds a nice freshness to a poultry or seafood stock, in particular. You could aslo make a compound butter out of the chopped fennel fronds (compound butters freeze well) or put some in a homemade creamy herb dip (mayo & sour cream or yogurt & garlic powder) or homemade boursin spread (half butter/half cream cheese in the food processor). 

1 Red and 1 Green Lettuce for your continued salad pleasure. There are also two bags of salad greens - one is the peppery arugula and the other, perhaps less familiar, is mizuna, which has the more feathery appearance and a milder flavor (see the suggestion for radishes and mizuna with white balsmaic vinaigrette below). The greens are dunked to remove coarse dirt particles and cool down the leaves, then they are portioned into bags. You should still wash your greens and then spin them dry in a salad spinner and store dry in a loosely closed, dry plastic bag with a paper towel at the bottom if you think there is still a lot of moisture. Greens sitting in water will go bad quickly, so get 'em dry or eat 'em now.

Radishes to top that salad. If you've never gotten around to sauteeing slices of radish in butter 'til just tender, give it a shot. Thin-sliced radishes and coarsely chopped mizuna make a nice salad, dressed with white balsamic vinaigrette.

Garlic. Oh, precious garlic! This is the second to last share and the garlic should keep well, so don't feel you must use it all this week. The cloves of our garlic tend to be ginormous - one can provide enough sliced garlic for an entire sautee, etc.

1 Asian and 1 Italian Eggplant. Usually we have had a hard frost by October 15th. It is some sort of strange miracle that these guys are still kicking. As I was stocking the farmstand yesterday morning, I was noticing that many of our eggplants were damaged (soft spots, brown spots forming under the calyx) - they do not appreciate the shorter days, cool nights and damp mornings. Use these promptly to avoid spoiling. Sliced or diced eggplant are great in a stir fry. Add after onions, carrots, celery, fennel (hard things like that), at the same time as peppers, and before bok choy. I find that if I just stir fry everything on high heat in organic canola oil with just salt and pepper and make a sauce to add at the last moment, i get less soggage. Chopped garlic, ginger, minced chilli peppers, soy and/or fish sauce, orange or lime juice, and sesame oil are some good ingredients for your sauce.

Bok Choy. So fun to say. so delicious to crunch on. I like to cut off the base so that I can wash the bottoms of the stems under running water, rubbing away any dirt (kind of like you clean the dirt off the bottom of celery stems). Then I usually slice the stems across thinly so you have half moons (add these to a stir fry a few minutes earlier) and then just coarsely chop the greens to toss into a stir fry or brothy soup at the very last minute - they will wilt quickly. For a simple side, let's look to our cooking hero and money magnet, Martha Stewart, whose Seasonal Produce Recipe Guide is truly indispensable and should probably be bookmarked by all CSA Members everywhere. Anyway, the simple side is Bok Choy with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger. My aunt turned me on to this salad featuring bok choy and ramen noodles, though several variations exist - don't be afraid to experiment!

Since we are talking about salads featuring ramen noodles, there is also one for your pointy "gnome" cabbage. I need to get the exact recipe from our friends, but they made it at a dinner party last week and it was fabulous. There was shredded cabbage and carrot, 3 packs of ramen noodles (seasoning packets discarded), sunflower seeds, and an apple cider dressing. They called it crack salad, due to its addictive quality and crunchiness, presumably. Another killer cole slaw is this one featuring a peanut butter and fresh herb dressing. If these cold days have you wanting more warm dishes, check out the recipes page and search for cabbage for all sorts of hot recipe ideas for cabbage rolls, soups, strudels, etc.


Hot peppers were available for you to take next to the sign in board. It is a great time of year to be making chilli. The long red peppers (cayenne) also dry well. Just keep them out of the sun in a dry spot and they should dry right up. I sometimes just hack off a few thin slices of dried cayenne pepper to add to my mortar and pestle or to olive oil and garlic when sauteeing broccoli raab or bok choy, at the beginning of a stir fry or soup, or pasta sauce. If you put the pepper in a coffee grinder you'll have your own crushed red pepper flakes. If you grind it fine you'll have your own chilli powder. 

Posted 10/10/2013 3:49pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Good afternoon! Farmer Dylan here again with your CSA info. It's a perfect autumn share!

 

2 lbs fingerling potatoes. These tasty and colorful little potatoes are excellent roasted with garlic and oil. We've provided a mix of white, red, and some white-and-red. See what you get!


One Bulb of Garlic. Apply liberally!

1 lb shallots. These onions might make you cry when you cut them but do not be intimidated! They have a rather mild flavor.


1 bunch Red Russian kale. This is my favorite veggie lately! This kale is tender and sweet, it's excellent sauteed, in salads or sandwiches(if you like your ruffage) or baked into simple and surprisingly tasty kale chips.


1 large green cabbage. Our cabbage crop is really cranking right along! We've selected large green cabbages for your share this week. You'll have plenty to make warming fall soups with, or perhaps follow our hero Michael Pollin's lead and make some sauerkraut!


2 heads of lettuce. Our tender and buttery lettuce crop just won't stop growing! We've got two heads for your salads and sandwiches this week.

3-4 sweet peppers. A mix of three medium or four smaller peppers, both green and colored. A little reminder that summer wasn't that long ago!


1 head escarole. This bold-flavored bitter green is best cooked down in soups. Here's a simple recipe for escarole and white beans.

1 bunch celery root. I think this stuff is just so cool. We've kept the tops on in case you'd like to add it to your soup broth. The roots themselves I just use anywhere I'd otherwise use a potato. I love having mashed potatoes and celery root. I bet they'd go great in a potato pancake or in homefries as well! Here's a root vegetable gratin you might like to experiment with!

1 large broccoli floret. Our broccoli crop is really blooming! These huge green trees would be great in a veggie platter(with some kohlrabi sticks!), used in soups, anywhere really. Broccoli is easy to eat a ton of, and is healthy, versatile, and delicious! A true classic. Use it in a baked macaroni and cheese perhaps! We shared some excellent sauteed garlic and broccoli at lunch today.

Thank you to our extended Farmily for keeping organic food alive and growing! See you at the farmstand!!!

Farmer D

Posted 9/19/2013 4:31pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hi everybody! Sorry to bombard you with emails. But I realized I left out a couple things on Monday and I'm really excited about our broccoli . . . keep reading. We at White Barn Farm sure do appreciate all the support and hope you are eating well and feasting right along!

This Saturday! September 21st. 9:30 to 12:30: Yoga Ground and Chow. A morning session of Yoga with Patty, followed by a healthy cooking demo and meal by Karen Ring (bring a notebook if you want to jot down some recipes). $22. Bring a mat and water, dress in layers, and have a wonderful day! To RSVP and/or be notified of yoga happenings with Patty, email pateoneill@aol.com

I wanted to let you all know that there is a fundraiser at The Chieftain on Sunday, September 22nd to raise money for the Boston  Brain Tumor Walk on behalf of Plainville resident, Karen Quintal, who was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor. We have added a prize to the raffle - a big box of veggies, plus a dozen eggs, a loaf of bread, a bag of coffee beans, and a jar of honey. The Chieftain has a wonderful atmosphere and is run by my the family of my girlhood chum, the Cahills. It is a really good cause and should be a good time, too.

New Cookbook. The Asparagus to Zucchini book was such a hit, we decided to offer the new cookbook put out by the same Fairshare CSA Coalition out of Madison, Wisconsin. It is called Farm Fresh and Fast and has lots of new recipes, including a section on cocktails, good pictures, and the same sensible basic guide format. It is for sale online for $25, but since we ordered in bulk we can offer it for $19.95 or just $20 if you don't want that nickel :)

Fall Equinox is September 22nd and the Full Moon is tonight. We have been enjoying the giant moon rising over the trees at the bottom of the hill behind the farmstand. With this cool weather we are sure it is our last week of tomatoes from the field and the last week we will have watermelons. Come by and get the last taste of summer! I am really happy to report that our supergreens are coming in strong: Broccoli, Tuscan Kale, Red Russian Kale, Escarole, Frisee, and Romaine Lettuce are on the farmstand! Yippee! I found two recipes from another farm that shares our website host, Small Farm Central, that marry together these last of summer and first of fall ingredients: Broccoli and Green Zebra Salad and Shredded Kale and Sungold Tomatoes. Our eggplants and sweet peppers will go strong until a hard frost, so keep including those in your menu. The zucchini is still going but you can definitely drop WBF cukes and sweet corn from the shopping list. We have garlic, onions, shallots, cipollini onions, beets, and potatoes for your staples. Cilantro is finally back and we've got hot pepps, red onion, garlic, and firm tomatoes to make a killer hand chopped salsa. I must stop.

Farm Fundraiser September 28th. 3:30 to 8:30. Raffle, Music, Picnic, Farm Tours, Crafts. We are still trying to pay back a very generous family member who funded our massive driveway overhaul at the farmstand. My grandmother (the actual owner of this place) had the barn painted this summer and we would love for our raffle to make a dent in that bill, too. It is hard to charge a lot for food in the age of mega farms and supermarkets, but perhaps you'd like to throw down a few bucks to enjoy an evening of original reggae music by Pressure Cooker with The Surviving Keneallys opening for them around 4pm. We will have a version of our farmstand set up, as many other local crafters and artisans as we can wrangle, the raffle, and a tour. Bring your own beach chair or blanket and a picnic if you like, an instrument if you play, and your dancing feet. Park at the farmstand and carefully cross the street. This could be your chance to finally see where we start the seeds and grow the food and flowers you see at the farmstand! Plus you can meet our chickens! Now if that doesn't convince you I don't know what will.