Blog

Welcome to the blog.
Posted 10/15/2010 3:09pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hi everyone! We will be open today! It may be windy and cold. Our driveway is better suited for mud wrestling than parking and walking. But we will be at the stand at 3pm until sunset (that is 6:04pm tonight). 
Fall crops are in full swing and the final demise of the tomatoes is official. We had a frost on Saturday night/Sunday morning. But there is still plenty to eat!!! Lettuce is exceptionally beautiful at this time of year. There is kale, swiss chard, bok choy, scallions, onions, garlic, potatoes, peppers, cabbage, celery root, fennel, carrots, a tiny bit of broccoli and cauliflower, and lots of winter squash. Plus Jack O'Lantern pumkins, popcorn, blue corn, giant decorative winter squashes that look like Cinderella's carriage. Baby pumpkins, Dancing & Spinning Gourds (nature's tops), and more. We have coffee from Sheldonville Roasters, a humble gentleman from Sheldonville who roasts coffee in his homemade roaster in 4 lb batches. His labels are very good and lots of the beans are organic, fair-trade, or both. $5 for a half pound and I don't know if you can get coffee more freshly roasted. We still have eggs from Brambly Farm, which reminds me - if you still want to order your . . .

  • Thanksgiving Turkey here's the info:
The O'Harte family of Brambly Farm in Norfolk raises Bourbon Reds, Royal palms, Bronze Turkeys, all listed Heritage breeds. They also raise Traditional Broad Breasted Whites. They are fed all natural grains and are pasture raised. The Royal Palms are a small type breed and its unusual for them to grow bigger than 14 lbs but they do taste truly delicious. The Bourbon Reds and Bronze can range between 12 - 24lbs and are regarded by many as the best way to give a big family a very special Thanksgiving. Traditional Broad Breasted Whites usually are between 18-32 lbs. Once in a while there are a few "Extra Large Giant Turkeys" that just forget to stop eating and these can weigh  over 32 lbs.

small heritage turkeys 8 - 14 lbs : $65 each 

Medium heritage turkeys   15 - 24 lbs : $80 each

large traditional turkeys  25 - 32 lbs : $95 each

If available "E L G Ts"  over 32 lbs :    $110 each

The fresh (not frozen) Turkeys will be available for pick-up the Monday and Tuesday just before Thanksgiving (Nov. 22 & 23) here at White Barn Farm. We will send a notice with more details about the pick-up to all who have sent a deposit (really, don't forget your email address!). If you would like to pick up at White Barn Farm, please note that when you mail your check, as Brambly is selling to customers at other farms, too.

To reserve a turkey please mail your $25 deposit check, made to Brambly Farm, to:

Brambly Farm * 84 Cleveland St * Norfolk, MA * 02056

Please include a note with the following information: Your name, phone number, email address, and preference of birds (breed and preferred size). Sooner is better for best selection . . . If you want to pick up here at White Barn Farm, make sure to indicate that.

If you have additional questions, you can email Ted and Sandra and family at bramblyfarms@yahoo.com

  • White Barn Farm Dinner at Cook and Brown Public House in Providence


Next Sunday we are going to be part of a special White Barn Farm Dinner at Cook and Brown Public House, a fairly new restaurant in Providence. We have been selling produce to Chef Nemo all season and have had several occasions to enjoy a drink and a snack at their lovely bar. Chef Nemo has a true dedication to using quality ingredients and has been a great supporter of our little farm.  We are excited to team up and create a little buzz about local ingredients prepared in season. Dinner will be on Sunday, October 24 at 6:30pm. We will be there to talk about the farm and participate in the merriment. The five-course menu will be based on ingredients grown at our farm and meat raised at Brambly Farm in Norfolk. You may also choose to enjoy your meal with wine pairings, carefully selected by the staff at Cook & Brown.
Check out the invitation 
 You can make a reservation by calling 401.273.7275 

Posted 10/13/2010 4:59pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

What the heck was in my box this week, you must be thinking . . . 

2 lbs Sweet Potatoes- The long, dirty roots in the plastic bag. These do not need to be refrigerated. Make sure they don't get nicked or bruised and they could last a while. But they are so delicious, I really recommend just eating them. Chris wrote about his favorite way to prepare these sweet treats last year: "cut into small cubes sauté some onions and garlic then fry them for some delicious sweet potato home fries, add some hot pepper to the mix for sweet and spicy Sunday morning dish."
My best friend’s sister made a great sweet potato soup that was the potatoes peeled and cut into chunks and boiled in stock (just enough to cover the potatoes) until fork tender. In a sautee pan, she fried up some onion, garlic, ginger, and a jalapeno. When the potatoes were cooked she added a can of coconut milk, the sautéed ingredients, and blended the whole mixture (I would use an immersion blender, but batches in the blender works, too.) The soup is finished with the juice of a couple limes. Taste for salt and pepper and bon appetit.

We get asked all the time, Is this a yam?  What is the difference between a yam and sweet potato?  These were some of my favorite answers when we asked our friend, Google:  

1-http://homecooking.about.com/od/howtocookvegetables/a/sweetpotatodiff.htm

2-http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/mysteries/sweetpotato.html

3-http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-23-a.html

1 Big Celery Root, with the tops on (AKA Celeriac). This is probably the most unrecognizable item in this week's share. It is a big brown ugly orb with dense white flesh. The root will store best if you remove the tops - we left them on in case you wanted to bunch them and hang them upside down out of the sun to have some dried celery leaf for winter soups (as soon as crispy dry, crumble into a jar and store with your other dried herbs. The rinsed leaves can also go into a stockpot. They would make a lovely bed for a roasted chicken, as well.
Peel this root and dice or slice for oven roasting (just the usual baking sheet method) excellent in a medley of roasted roots - carrots, turnips, rutabaga, potatoes, sweet potatoes, onions. If you are roasting a chicken all these same diced roots can roast right in the same pan with the bird. you can add it to a pot of boiling potatoes and make a mashed potato/celery root puree. 

Celery root remoulade is a tradition in France. It is basically a slaw. Normally the root is peeled and made into very fine matchsticks with the help of that fancy kitchen tool, the mandoline. Alice Waters' cookbook, The Art of Simple Food (which would be super for any CSA member to own) has a reliable recipe for remoulade: 

"Cut away all the brown skin and small roots from about 1 lb of celery root. make a julienne - chop into 1/8 inch thick slices then slice into matchstick size pieces. toss with salt and 1 teaspoon of white wine vinegar.
in a small bowl, mix together: 2 TBsp creme fraiche (or substitute one egg yolk with 3 tbsp olive oil whisked in), 2 tsp dijon mustard, juice of 1/2 lemon, 2 tsp extra virgin olive oil, S&P. stir well, pour over the clery root and toss to coat. taste for salt and acid. the salad can be served right away or refrigerated for up to  day. 
She suggests serving this winter salad alongside other little salads such as marinated beets, carrot salad, arugula salad. Other variations are to add other julienned root vegetables such as rutabaga, carrot or radish or to toss with fresh arugula or to sprinkle with chopped parsley, chervil, or mint."
 

The restaurant, Oleana, in Cambridge served a wonderful twist on raviolis with thin slices of blanched celery root instead of pasta. some delicious filling and a sauce with wild mushrooms. yum. 

A box grater is all you need to make a grated salad of celery root and carrots, maybe with a light mayonaise based dressing with some mustard and lemon. some thinly sliced shallot or red onion would go well with this, perhaps some parsley.

Winterbor kale. look up potato and kale soup. Chop this variety a little more before cooking, make sure to cook with generous olive oil and lots of sliced garlic, kosher salt, and stock, soy sauce, or balsamic vinegar if you need more liquid. Chopped up kale can be good in a cheese quesadilla to accompany a soup.

1 Butternut Squash. These should store at room temperature for quite some time if you don't want to use it right away. Squashes can always be roasted in the oven. Roasted Butternuts make a nice puree for filling raviolis or for an unconventional lasagna or using in a pumpkin pie or muffin recipe. The ease of peeling a butternut makes it a great candidate for peeling, dicing, and making into a soup or risotto or just sauteeing on the stovetop. Curried squash definiitely works. 
For a traditional creamy squash soup I would dice it up, add a few coarsely chopped onions, a chopped carrot, a clove of garlic, a potato for texture, and cover it with stock. Cook until tender (in a pressure cooker makes this really fast) then puree with an immersion blender for the least dishwashing. Season with salt and pepper, a good pat of butter for richness, a dash or two of apple cider vinegar if it lacks tang, nutmeg, cinnamon, etc if you like that feel, curry and cayenne if you like that style. Some cream, milk, half n half if you want a true cream soup. Just keep tasting and adjusting until it is super great.
For something very different from an excellent cookbook for Southeast Asian cuisine, Hot, Sour, Salty, Sweet I highly recommend this recipe - in addition to the squash you'll need cilantro, coconut milk, stock, fish sauce, and shallots:
"Silky Coconut-Pumpkin Soup, Thailand, Laos: In a heavy skillet or on a charcoal or gas grill, dry-roast or grill 3 or 4 shallots, turning occasionally until softened and blackened. Peel, cut lenghtwise in half and set aside.
Peel the pumkin and clean off any seeds. cut into small 1/2 inch cubes. you should have about 5 cups of cubed pumpkin. place 2 cups canned or fresh coconut milk, 2 cups mild pork or chicken broth, pumpkin, shallots, and 1 cup loosely packed cilantro in a large pot and bring to a boil. add 1/2 tsp salt and simmer over medium heat until the pumpkin is tender, about 10 minutes. stir in 2 tbsp fish sauce and cook for another 2-3 minutes. taste or salt and add a little more fish sauce if you wish. (The soup can be served immediately, but has even more flavor if left to stand for up to an hour. reheat just before serving). generously grind black pepper over and finish with a sprinkle of fresh scallion greens to serve. freezes well."

Butternut Squash Risotto is another great recipe. A very good vegetarian option if you have vegetable stock on hand. I start out with finely diced yellow onions, sauteed in olive oil with a good pinch of kosher salt. When they are translucent, add the diced squash (the smaller dice the faster it cooks - just choose a size you want in your dish) and sautee until just becoming tender - at that point I usually remove half the mixture mostly to make space in the pan - but also to ensure that I have some good texture at the end. Add arborio rice to the pan (as much as you want - 2 cups is probably plenty for a family of four). Stir with your Italian grandmother's wooden spoon until it starts to crackle a little bit, get all the rice coated and tossed. then add white wine, just enough to almost cover the rice. stir thoroughly then let it sit until the wine is absorbed and more liquid is needed. Add a ladle or two of stock (homemade and heated in a saucepan next to your risotto if you are really on top of it - I sometimes just pour right out of the chicken stock box). stir thoroughly and wait for it to "talk to you" or crackle a little for more stock. continue stirring and waiting and adding more liquid. after a while you can start tasting for doneness. at this point, add the rest of the squash back in. al dente rice is what you are going for - i think that is the theory behind adding just a little liquid at once. At the end it is tasty to add something a little rich. a couple pats of butter or some shredded cheese - pecorino romano worked great. definitely add salt and pepper and make sure to taste for enough salt. you can be creative with your seasonings - curry, nutmeg, cinnamon, fresh sage or rosemary. crisped pancetta could be a nice accompaniment. 

Two heads of lettuce. The beautiful red butterhead, Skyphos, and the crunchy greenleaf, Loma. Salad time!

Escarole. This is not lettuce!!! You can use it in a salad, but it is quite bitter, so you must like that sort of thing. I think it is best sliced or chopped in with other mixed greens if you want to have it raw. I say: time to make escarole and white beans! a very very simple recipe. Sautee a sliced onion and a clove of garlic (or more or less) in olive oil. You can add some spicy sausage at this point if you want. Add the washed and coarsley chopped escarole. Toss well with the oil and wait for it to cook down like spinach, chard and kale do. Add a can of cannellini beans with all the juices. Add a couple cups of chicken stock to just cover. Cook a little longer to let everything get together. Taste for S&P. Ladle into bowls and serve with fresh grated parmesan and black pepper. Heat up a good loaf of bread for the side and dinner is served.

Frisee. This is also in the endive family. It is the tall thin, frilly head of bitter greens. This can also be cooked similar to the escarole method. Brittany suggested a very simple pasta tossed with just olive oil and garlic and chopped frisee so it just wilts in a little bit. Serve with parmesan. I think frisee is a great base for a salad. But it does like to have something a little rich along with it. Maybe a creamy cheese - a good combo is a creamy blue or goat cheese with poached pear and pecans or walnuts. Another good choice is to toss it with a bacon vinaigrette, some thin shaved shallots or red onions, and finish with a sunny side up egg. Make some cheesy toast on the side and voila! Lunch. Frisee can also be chopped up in a mixed greens salad. A sweet dressing like a cranberry/raspberry vinaigrette would go well. And of course fruits, cheeses, and nuts are nice complements.

Bunch of arugula. I love chopped arugula in a warm or cold pasta salad or potato salad. Good in a sandwich. Great for a salami, mozzarella, arugula Piadina=Italian Quesadilla. Chop with apple, red onion, and a simple honey-mustard-lemon vinaigrette.

Beets! The last bunch of the season! They will store best with the tops removed. The tops are super steamed and served with a pat of butter and perhaps a splash of cider vinegar. You can dice up beets and sweet potatoes for a candy-like roasted root medley. Beets and Blue cheese and walnuts on a frisee salad would be so fall . . .

Kohlrabi. We made a super accidental recipe discovery at lunch the other day. Chris had cooked up some of our Red Noodle String Beans to see if they were any good. He sauteed lots of smashed garlic in olive oil, added raw peanuts, and then the beans. He sauteed that for a while, added some chilli flakes and sesame oil and whatever other magical ingredients he uses. We all loved them! We decided you could serve anything in that sauce! Our huge kohlrabi, sliced in half to see if it had a sound center at that magnificent size, loomed on the counter. We butchered off a chunk and grated it on the box grater - tossed it in the sauce (garlic, oil, peanuts). I decided to add the juice of half a lime and some salt. Yummy slaw! My favorite is still roasted, though. Diced kohlrabi on a baking sheet, tossed with olive oil, S&P, rosemary and/or thyme if you like. Flip once with a flat spatula to get both sides crispy. mmm. Someone suggested kohlrabi and carrots mashed together with a little butter. good idea! Use half to make a slaw, wrap up the rest, then roast along with celery root and carrots  for a perfect accompaniment for grilled steak or roasted chicken or anything - squash soup, etc.

onions and garlic

Enjoy!!! We hope you are still keeping up with the challenge of eating in season!

Posted 10/7/2010 12:51pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hey everyone! Here are some ideas about what to do with your share, from Chris and Christy this time. I just found a bunch of recipes to add from our website provider, small farm central. All the farms with them can share recipes so I just added lots of relevant ones. Either scroll through or search by veggie.

Broccoli – Its been awhile since we have seen this glorious brassica.
  One of our favorites! This is organic broccoli so it is likely that there could be a little green caterpillar under the crown. For that reason, I suggest cutting each head into florets so you can check them. For a quick lunch the other day we just roasted the broccoli  on a baking sheet tossed with a little olive oil, salt, pepper, and soy sauce, so good so simple.

Bunch of arugula- Great raw, chopped up for a salad, or add to pasta dishes right at the end.  The flavor is going to be peppery so it likes either something sweet or sour to complement it. We always have our fridge stocked with lemons for some last minute adjustments.

Bunch of mustard greens- this size of mustard greens are probably best enjoyed quickly wilted.  This is your perfect side dish to any meal.  How bout we make these greens Spanish style? First, coarsely chop your green.  Then, get your pan nice and hot with some olive oil add chopped garlic cook until golden brown, add your greens.  Briefly sauté greens until they change to a darker green .  Add raisins and pine nuts for some delicious Spanish greens. 

Savoy Cabbage- Cabbage land is looking plentiful this year.  A coleslaw or some fish tacos is good. If you feel too cold for raw cabbage, look up some recipes for braised cabbage, or a quick sauerkraut,. Cabbage is pretty tasty fried in a pan with some butter. We had a pretend Oktoberfest at our house the other night. Sausages, pretzel bread, lots of mustards. How about some cabbage? Try making stuffed cabbage. 

Romaine Lettuce. Check out Alice Waters’ Caesar Salad recipe I put on the website. Or chopped romaine is great with some sweet peppers, red onion, olives and feta.

Red Leaf (magenta) Lettuce. Another salad. Or for some good crunch on a sandwich. How about this: grilledApple, cheddar, turkey, honey-mustard. Raw onion and lettuce at the end for crunch.

Parsley. I just added a tabouleh recipe to the website. Parsley is great for mixing with breadcrumbs if you are topping a casserole, or frying some eggplant. I added it to a béchamel along with some parmesan and asiago to make a sauce for my potato gratin the other night.

Potatoes. Gratin. Mashed. Roasted with Rosemary or Thyme. Boiled and mashed with a pat of butter and pinch of chopped parsley on your plate. Cut into French fry shaped sticks for roasting and have with some breaded baked fish for a leaner fish&chips. Serve with garlic sautéed kale for some color.

Peppers.

Bok-Choy. Check out the recipes on the website. Sautéed, grilled,  stir-fried, raw in a salad, in a brothy soup.

Kale. Make a quick pasta or top a crostini along with some creamy ricotta or goat cheese

Fennel. Check out the recipes on the website.

Acorn Squash. We’ve really been enjoying how fast and tasty these guys cook up when you slice them in half lengthwise, scoop out the seeds, and then put the cut side down on the cutting board and cut 1/2” cross sections so it looks like half-moon shapes. I put those on a baking sheet with some oil, salt, and pepper. You can get crazy with seasonings. Salty, spicy, sweet, curry, rosemary. 350 for maybe 15-20 minutes. Check after a little bit, flip if you want to. When they’re fork tender they’re done.

Onions and Garlic. Crucial.

Posted 10/1/2010 7:02pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
The drought is officially over! Our hairdos are windblown, but we managed to skate by without harvesting in the rain too much this week. Unfortunately, the weekday Roadside Stand was rainy both Tuesday and Friday. It seems as though our luck is about to change, however. We will have our Saturday Morning Stand tomorrow as usual from 10am - 2pm. It looks like it will be the quintessential fall day: sunny, clear, and crisp!

  • FAQ
Since we get this question a lot: The stand will be open as usual for four more weeks.
Tuesdays and Fridays 3pm to sunset and Saturdays 10am to 2pm.
Our last day at the stand will be on Saturday, October 30. 

  • Family Fun this Weekend
One of our CSA members works at Patriots Place and has organized a farmers market for their Fall Harvest Festival. He is hoping to start a regular farmers market there next year . . .  We are going to send some of our crew on Saturday and you can visit me and Chris there on Sunday. Ocean Spray is one of the sponsors and has a good website summarizing the event:

We will be at the festival this Saturday and Sunday, October 2 & 3. 
It is from 11am to 3pm in front of the Bass Pro Shop. 

Ward’s Berry Farm and Foxborough Community Farmstand will be there with us on Saturday.
Cook’s Valley will be joining us on Sunday.
We are sure to bring lots of pumpkins, winter squash, potatoes, onions, popcorn, and chinese lanterns.

  • Good Eats
* If you missed experiencing the excellent cuisine prepared by Chef Matt Maue of Tastings Wine Bar and Bistro at our first-ever farm dinner Sept. 19, there is another chance to check out how he handles fresh, local produce. This event will be held at Tastings on October 7 at 6:30pm. It is a set menu dinner celebrating the vegetables of the RAFT Grow-Out Project, sponsored by the Chefs Collaborative. RAFT = Restoring America's Food Traditions. The idea is to give farmers seeds of delicious, lost varieties of wonderful veggies and to have the farmers grow them out. Chefs agree to purchase these special items and feature them on their menus. And another vegetable variety escapes extinction . . .  We grew the speckled lettuce, Jimmy Nardello's Sweet Frying Peppers, Red Wethersfield onions, Gilfeather Turnips, Boston Marrow Squash, Trophy Tomato, etc. 
find out more about the Farm to Fork Dinner at Tastings in Foxboro

* Later in the month, we are pairing up with another young chef we've been working with for a special White Barn Farm Dinner at his Providence restaurant, Cook and Brown Public House on Sunday, October 24 at 6:30pm. You may not know this, but on Tuesday nights we pack everything left at the stand into the white van, along with a few pre-orders from the awesome restaurants we work with, and Chris drives down to sell veggies Providence. The chefs we work with have a special exuberance for beautiful produce and we all get a kick out of the wheeling and dealing out of the back of the van in the alleys at night. 9:30 or 10pm turns out to be a good time for both farmers and chefs to have a moment to connect. We love the food scene in Providence and there are such excellent restaurants, way more than just what Federal Hill has to offer. We've been working with Chez Pascal (Hope St.) and La Laiterie (Wayland Square) for two years. Cook and Brown opened right across the street from Chez. Easy delivery route! we thought. That is true, but we have been blown away by the awesome food we've sampled at their very chic bar, waiting for Chef Nemo to be available. I had, by far, the best onion rings I've ever tasted with some incredible aioli as a little bar snack. The space is lovely and the menu is totally focused on quality ingredients. Anyway, Nemo needs to get the word out about his restaurant. He heard about our farm dinner and offered to cook for the next one. We decided an indoor location would be better for the rest of this year, so we settled on a Sunday evening dinner at his restaurant. The five-course menu will be based on ingredients grown at our farm. Wine pairings are available. We'll be attending and talking to guests, maybe even showing some slides.
Nemo and his wife Jenny created this nice
invitation for the
White Barn Farm Dinner at Cook and Brown Public House in Providence 

  • Yoga at the Farm 
For the last few weeks, Wednesdays at 5:45pm, we've been doing yoga outside at the farm. Chris' mom, Patty, is a yoga teacher in Cambridge. She has been making the trek down here to make sure her farmers get limber. We’ve been practicing on the grass right at the barn! She does vinyasa yoga with wonderful humor and incorporates a good balance of challenge, relaxation, and plain old stretching sore muscles.

Park in the field where the Roadside Stand is, then look both ways and cross the road, walk towards the barn, and head down the hill to the left towards the big Ash tree. Bring a mat (and a block if you have one). Suggested donation is $7. Make sure to bring a layer for when it gets chilly. If it is rainy, we have space indoors in the barn.
There is a limit to the space inside, so email Patty at
pateoneill@aol.com to reserve a spot.

Posted 9/29/2010 11:43am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hi Everybody! Tomatoes are on the downhill and fresh fall greens are on the up and up. why is it so hot out still? I had my long johns all ready to go! Oh well. I'm sure it is pushing some good growth on our fall cover crops and vegetable crops alike. The broccoli is showing its buds and they are growing each day. Even the cauliflower is looking promising (it's our first try for cauli)

So what was in your share this week?

1 bunch Crunchy Royale Radishes. Like little apples! These bionic radishes grow large, stay crunchy, and don't split. You can slice them in rounds or make little matchsticks and throw these in a salad or a slaw. Or just eat them like an apple. or put thin slices on buttered bread. or sautee them briefly in butter for a lighter potato-esque side. I've heard of making a pesto out of the tops. 

1 bunch of Carrots. This variety is named Bolero. A winner, I say. really good flavor. Perfect for shredding on a salad or into a slaw. Shredded carrots are fabulous on sandwiches, too. Or do the matchsticks for a stir fry or maybe a chopped salad with matchsticks of kohlrabi, radish, carrot and chopped arugula. I'm thinking those along with hard boiled egg and a lemon-honey-mustard vinaigrette would be a good combo. Of course, if you are roasting veggies, chunks of carrot roast up super sweet. Carrot cake/muffins are delicious. 

1 bunch Swiss Chard. Swiss Chard goes very well with cheese and eggs. Quiche, frittata, scramble, breakfast burrito. A homemade macaroni and cheese is nice with chard wilted in with the cooked pasta and warm cheese sauce, then baked with bread crumbs on top (perfect chance to use any leftover parsley, too - finely chopped with the bread crumbs). A sautee if swiss chard with a sweet and sour golden raisin and rediced vinegar sauce and toasted pine nuts is great. I always enjoyed a pasta with chard, feta, and toasted walnuts. Use your instincts!
 
Eggplant. If they're adding up, try the baba ganouj. It's always good to have a snacking dip around. Pita triangles or some veggie sticks would be the perfect vehicle (kohlrabi and carrot sticks, for example). Grilled eggplant is yummy on a sandwich or a pizza or just chopped up with some grilled sweet peppers and onions and tossed with a little balsamic and olive oil for a side or a topping for a slice of good bread. Our neighbor Kathy did not leave any of her gourmet instincts behind on a recent camping trip. She wrapped a couple eggplants in foil and put them in the fire to roast. She scooped out the cooked eggplant and mashed it with some garlic, olive oil, and parmesan cheese. It was a wonderful dip for a loaf of bread. I love that story!

Onions and Garlic. These should keep in a basket on the counter okay. They just need to be dry. The onions are not storing as well as we would like. We try to rogue out any soft ones, but if you end up with some bad onions just let us know and we'll send you to the basket at the stand to replace them. The garlic is the bomb.

2 Zeppelin Delicata Winter Squash. The cream colored squash with green stripes. This is winter squash. It has very delicate skin, which is edible if you like. The easiest cooking method is to just slice them lengthwise and bake in the oven. Maybe try with honey or maple syrup or ginger or nutmeg or cinnamon and some butter. It is also quite sweet and delicious on its own. This is really a pretty easy crowd-pleasing side dish.

1 bunch of Spicy Arugula. The bunch of greens with the roots on. it's just a bunching method, you don't eat the roots (I don't think. In the case of cilantro, the roots are used in southeast Asian recipes). This is kind of a spicy arugula so I recommend chopping it for a salad or pizza or sandwich. You can treat it like an herb. Finish an egg dish or a risotto with it. A really tasty salad combo is arugula, diced red onion, and thinly sliced green apple with that honey-lemon-mustard vinaigrette. Toss the apples in the dressing as soon as they're cut so they don't brown. Chopped arugula is great in sandwiches. Even a BLT - BLAT!

Bok Choi. Our little hourglass-shaped friend. This should be stored in a plastic bag in the fridge so it doesn't get wilty (same for all leafy greens). To prepare it, I'd cut off the base so the individual leaves can be removed and rinsed at the bottom (kind of like celery - collects dirt at the base). Then you can cut it lengthwise and braise it with some garlic and onions, then stock and soy sauce if you want to feature it as a side. If you are throwing it in a stir fry, I'd slice it cross-wise and add the stems first and then add the leafy part towards the end. My aunt gave me a recipe for a delicious salad made with bok choi. And one of our farmstand shoppers described a very healthful and satisfying preparation: She layers a bowl with first bean sprouts, then shredded carrot, then thinly sliced bok choi (she will also substitute kale or chard or whatever). Then she pours a boiling broth (she makes one out of water, soy, sesame oil - I think chicken, veggie or mushroom stock would work great, too) over it and has a nice soup. Maybe she added rice noodles, too (if not it would be good)
 
sweet peppers. Good in that veggie wrap or roasted or in the stir fry or a salad.
tomatoes. a few stragglers.
1 pint tomatillos. Hope you are enjoying salsas with these little guys.
 
1 Kohlrabi. The alien vegetable. Slice the bottom so you have a flat surface to put on the cutting board, cut off the skin and then make sticks or cut into chunks for roasting. We had a report of roasting kohlrabi and other veggies under a chicken (using the vegetables as a rack). The kohlrabi acted like a sponge for all of the flavorful juices produced in the pan. Don't forget the slaw option. Kohlrabi lasts a ridiculously long time in the fridge. If you're not inspired to use it this week, just push it to the back and it should keep.  But beware, the cabbage crops coming along are looking good.

1.5 lbs  String Beans. Mostly yellow beans, and a few green for flair. Another simple side dish. These can be blanched and frozen if you are overwhelmed. I'll try to add a few recipes to the website.

That may be everything! If i'm forgetting any item that you have questions about, just send me an email.

Thanks so much for your continuing journey through the seasons in vegetables!

Take Care!
Chris and Christy at White Barn Farm 
Posted 9/24/2010 6:50pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hey Team! Week 17! Holy Smokes! Time is flying by!

Quick reminder: Pick-up hours end at sunset (6:40 this week, a little earlier every week). 
and one more: we happily accept the clean pint/quart containers back, as well as clean egg cartons.

Fresh Cannellini Beans. These are fresh shelling beans. Take the pods off the plant, take the beans out of the shells. They just need to be cooked briefly, preferrably in a flavorful liquid, like a stock. A fresh minestrone soup would be perfect. Some chicken broth, butter, and sage would be nice. Or use your Tuscan Kale and do a White Beans and Escarole sort of dish. The beans can be boiled quickly until tender and then used for a fresh bean salad - maybe with your red onion, tomato, and parsley. Hey! look what I just googled: New York Recipes.

Napa Cabbage. So good for slaw. Today I decided to stray a little away from my go-to slaw with the peanuts, cilantro, mint, basil, soy, sesame. Instead, I slivered the cabbage, tossed with a little salt and whipped up a dressing of a couple cloves of garlic in the garlic press, a couple teaspoons of dijon, a couple of cider vinegar (now available at the Big Apple!), a good drizzle of Franklin Honey, then whisked in canola and olive oil. I added lemon juice and S&P to taste and finished it with some fresh chopped dill. Voila! A hit! This cabbage is so sweet and crunchy and succulent that you don't have to do much to make it great. A farmstand shopper reported back that her cabbage rolls came out marvelously with the Napa. My aunt used it in soup. We love it in veggie wraps, fish tacos, and buffalo chicken wraps.

Sweet Peppers. Perfect for adding flavor to any stir-fry or pasta sauce. One CSA member told me she has been slicing onions and peppers very very thin then sauteeing in olive oil and putting on top of fish or chicken, baked in the oven. It keeps the meat moist and adds a wonderful aroma to your kitchen!

Red and Yellow Onions. Just enough for a few recipes. Small onions this year. :( We will irrigate them if we have another dry spring/early summer :)

Garlic. Just enough to flavor that kale, make some garlic-rubbed bruschetta, make your own aioli or salad dressing, flavor a pasta sauce.

Fennel. Read what Alice Waters has to say about fennel. The white bulb with the tall, feathery green fronds. The fronds can be used as an herb and would be especially fantastic in a seafood broth. Lobster shells or shrimp shells can go in a stockpot with onion and garlic peels, parsley stems, carrot ends, kale stems, peppercorns, celery leaves. You can make a wonderful fish stew with the strained stock. or chop them fine for a fresh herb to flavor a mixed herb dip or to add to a grain salad or best yet, a salad of the very thinly sliced fennel bulb. I adore fennel. It does have a strong flavor, so distaste for this vegetable is understandable, though I can't imagine not enjoying it in a balanced composition of flavors. One good combination is citrus and fennel. The key is to slice the bulb very thinly. Shaved is a better term. If you have an adjutstable mandoline, that is the best tool for getting the paper thinness. Anyway, toss it with some sectioned orange or grapefruit or blood orange and a citrus vinaigrette. Al Forno would serve tender, grilled calamari over a salad of shaved fennel with a mustard vinaigrette. Magnifique! If you are already a fennel lover, try roasting slices on a baking sheet in the oven, or just slice up the bulb and sprinkle with kosher salt and drizzle with a tasty olive oil - this is an excellent accompaniment to some good mozzarella (like from Narragansett Creamery). That is what I was served at the first lunch I had at an excellent cheesemaking dairy farm I WWOOFed at in Cremona, Lombardy, Italy.

Tuscan Kale. Try cooked kale in an omelet, a soup, with potatoes. I'm going to try to add a couple of kale recipes to the Recipe Menu on the website. I definitely recommend going to that and searching by vegetable for ideas. Here is Creamy Sesame Greens from Whole Foods.

1 lb Tomatillos. Enchiladas Verdes. Make a sauce for chicken, swordfish, or pork. Make a salsa for corn chips. The first step is to remove the papery husk, rinse, then slice in half and roast until collapsed. Once this has cooled you can add diced onion, serrano chili, lime juice, and cilantro for a good salsa.

Tomatoes. I made a yummy side dish for lunch the other day. We were having cheese quesadillas with thin sliced red onion, thin sliced red and yellow peppers, and cilantro. I opened a can of garbanzo beans, drained most of the juice and threw in a bowl with diced red onion, diced sweet pepper, and good, ripe chunks of tomato. I dressed with a dash of vinegar and a good drizzle of olive oil, and finally a good amount of chopped parsley. yum. and some protein for the vegetarians on our crew.

Speaking of parsley. That is this week's herb. Ana Sortun, of Oleana restaurant, has a good idea for a fancy condiment: parsley oil.

Cherry Tomatoes. Snack. or roast briefly for a candy-like treat.

3 Heads of Lettuce, including one head of Romaine. Caesar Salad! Whoopie! Grill some chicken and bread to make fresh croutons with and you just about have a meal. Have one more tomato sandwich or BLT.

Handful of Hot Peppers. Salsa, chilli, Jamaican Jerk, hot sauce, pickled hots, dry the cayenne.

thanks everyone!

 

Posted 9/23/2010 11:14pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
 
   
POLITICAL ACTION ALERT!!!

September 23, 2010



  FOOD SAFETY LEGISLATION MUST PROTECT 
FAMILY FARMS, SUSTAINABLE & ORGANIC AGRICULTURE

CALL YOUR SENATORS TODAY AND URGE THEM 
TO SUPPORT THE TESTER AMENDMENT  


The Food Safety Modernization Act (S. 510) could reach the Senate floor as early as tomorrow.  NSAC has been able to win several improvements to the bill but more changes are needed to avoid serious harm to family farm value-added processing and the emergence of local and regional food systems.    

S.510 would considerably ramp up FDA regulation on farms that even minimally process their crops and sell them to restaurants, food coops, groceries, schools and wholesalers.  An amendment sponsored by Senator Jon Tester (D-MT) would exempt small farm and small food processing facilities as well as small and mid-sized farmers who primarily direct market their products to consumers, stores or restaurants within their region.  

Please call your Senators today and ask them to support the Tester Amendment.

It's easy to call - for Massachusetts:  

Senator John Kerry: Washington office - 202-224-2742, Boston office - 617-565-8519

Senator Scott Brown: Washington office - 202-224-4543, Boston office - 617-565-3170

The message is simple. "I am a constituent of Senator___________ and I am calling to ask him/her to support the Tester Amendment and to include the Tester language in the Manager's Amendment to the food safety bill.  The Tester Amendment will exempt small farm and food facilities and farmers who direct market their products to consumers, stores or restaurants.   We need a food safety bill that cracks down on corporate bad actors without erecting new barriers to family farms and the growing healthy food movement.  Our continuing economic recovery demands that we preserve these market opportunities for small  and mid-sized family farms.  



Learn More: 

Most sustainable agriculture and family farm groups think the Senate bill with changes won by NSAC is a very significant improvement over the companion bill passed by the House of Representatives (HR 2749) last year.  The changes listed below will be included in the bill that goes to the Senate floor for a vote.  We can't support the Senate bill, however, unless the Tester amendment is also adopted.  We strongly oppose the companion House measure, and stand ready to defend the "good amendments" to the Senate bill when it goes to conference with the House later this year. 

The best way to ensure that the Tester provision is included with the final bill that emerges from conference is for it to be included in the Manager's Amendment as it goes to the floor of the Senate.  The Manager's Amendment includes all of the language that has the support of the three Democrats and three Republicans who are sponsoring the bill. Please call your Senator and request that the Tester language be added to the Manager's Amendment.  

The Manager's Amendment to S.510 already includes the following important improvements to the bill that have been backed by NSAC:

  • Sanders (D-VT) amendment (requiring FDA to write regulations to determine low risk on-farm processing activities that can be exempt from regulatory requirement);
  • Bennet (D-CO) amendment (to reduce unnecessary paperwork and streamline requirements for farmers and small processors);
  • Stabenow (D-MI) amendment (to create a USDA-delivered competitive grants program for farmer food safety training);
  • Boxer (D-CA) amendment (to eliminate anti-wildlife habitat language from the bill); and
Brown (D-OH) amendment (on traceability requirements, including exemptions for direct marketing and farm identity-preserved marketing).

 
 
FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE NOFA POLITICAL ACTION ALERT, OR THE NOFA POLICIES ON THE FOOD SAFETY MODERNIZATION ACT, PLEASE CONTACT NOFA/MASS POLICY DIRECTOR, JACK KITTREDGE AT JACK@NOFAMASS.ORG. 
 
NOFA/Mass is a community of farmers, gardeners, landscapers, and consumers, working to educate members and the general public about the benefits of local organic systems based on complete cycles, natural materials and minimal waste for the health of individual beings, communities and the living planet. 

NOFA/Mass
411 Sheldon Road
Barre, MA 01005
978-355-2853
 
 
 
Posted 9/23/2010 3:00pm by christy raymond.

 

Hi Guys! I've spent the day indoors doing Quickbooks, becoming organized, and scanning cookbooks for recipes to upload. Meanwhile, Chris and Ben have been harvesting the remaining winter squash, the gourds that I interplanted in our sunflower field, and the ornamental and flour corn that we grew. What a gorgeous gorgeous first day of fall/last day of summer. Indeed, what a glorious summer we've had. a real summer's summer.

Don't forget: tomorrow we are showing the Goonies on the barn. Come by at 6:30 for a tour if you want. Movie starts at 7pm. Don't forget to bring your chairs, blankets and treats! Parent-teacher conferences schmonferences. (just joking, everyone). Don't be afraid to come to just the tour or just the movie. Hope to see your happy faces! Park in the field where you pick up and be careful crossing the road. I'm going to send this email now and maybe create some links to new recipes, etc in the version I post on the blog - so check it out tomorrow if you want.

One more reminder: Pick-up hours end at sunset (6:40 this week, a little earlier every week). 
and one more: we happily accept the clean pint/quart containers back, as well as clean egg cartons.

Soybeans. Again! Edamame. Pluck those beans off the plant. Boil in salted water for five minutes. Snack on them with soy sauce or sea salt. If you're feeling ambitious, pop them out of the pods and add them to a salad or make a little smashed soybean humus. Last year, one of our members was really enjoying these cute little beans in a pasta salad.

Napa Cabbage. So good for slaw. Today I decided to stray a little away from my go-to slaw with the peanuts, cilantro, mint, basil, soy, sesame. Instead, I slivered the cabbage, tossed with a little salt and whipped up a dressing of a couple cloves of garlic in the garlic press, a couple teaspoons of dijon, a couple of cider vinegar (now available at the Big Apple!), a good drizzle of Franklin Honey, then whisked in canola and olive oil. I added lemon juice and S&P to taste and finished it with some fresh chopped dill. Voila! A hit! This cabbage is so sweet and crunchy and succulent that you don't have to do much to make it great. A farmstand shopper reported back that her cabbage rolls came out marvelously with the Napa. My aunt used it in soup. We love it in veggie wraps, fish tacos, and buffalo chicken wraps.

Sweet Peppers. Perfect for adding flavor to any stir-fry or pasta sauce. One CSA member told me she has been slicing onions and peppers very very thin then sauteeing in olive oil and putting on top of fish or chicken, baked in the oven. It keeps the meat moist and adds a wonderful aroma to your kitchen!

Red and Yellow Onions. Just enough for a few recipes. Small onions this year. :( We will irrigate them if we have another dry spring/early summer :)

Garlic. Just enough to flavor that kale, make some garlic-rubbed bruschetta, make your own aioli or salad dressing, flavor a pasta sauce.

Fennel. Read what Alice Waters has to say about fennel. The white bulb with the tall, feathery green fronds. The fronds can be used as an herb and would be especially fantastic in a seafood broth. Lobster shells or shrimp shells can go in a stockpot with onion and garlic peels, parsley stems, carrot ends, kale stems, peppercorns, celery leaves. You can make a wonderful fish stew with the strained stock. or chop them fine for a fresh herb to flavor a mixed herb dip or to add to a grain salad or best yet, a salad of the very thinly sliced fennel bulb. I adore fennel. It does have a strong flavor, so distaste for this vegetable is understandable, though I can't imagine not enjoying it in a balanced composition of flavors. One good combination is citrus and fennel. The key is to slice the bulb very thinly. Shaved is a better term. If you have an adjutstable mandoline, that is the best tool for getting the paper thinness. Anyway, toss it with some sectioned orange or grapefruit or blood orange and a citrus vinaigrette. Al Forno would serve tender, grilled calamari over a salad of shaved fennel with a mustard vinaigrette. Magnifique! If you are already a fennel lover, try roasting slices on a baking sheet in the oven, or just slice up the bulb and sprinkle with kosher salt and drizzle with a tasty olive oil - this is an excellent accompaniment to some good mozzarella (like from Narragansett Creamery). That is what I was served at the first lunch I had at an excellent cheesemaking dairy farm I WWOOFed at in Cremona, Lombardy, Italy.

Tuscan Kale. Try cooked kale in an omelet, a soup, with potatoes. I'm going to try to add a couple of kale recipes to the Recipe Menu on the website. I definitely recommend going to that and searching by vegetable for ideas. Here is Creamy Sesame Greens from Whole Foods.

1 lb Tomatillos. Enchiladas Verdes. Make a sauce for chicken, swordfish, or pork. Make a salsa for corn chips. The first step is to remove the papery husk, rinse, then slice in half and roast until collapsed. Once this has cooled you can add diced onion, serrano chili, lime juice, and cilantro for a good salsa.

Tomatoes. I made a yummy side dish for lunch the other day. We were having cheese quesadillas with thin sliced red onion, thin sliced red and yellow peppers, and cilantro. I opened a can of garbanzo beans, drained most of the juice and threw in a bowl with diced red onion, diced sweet pepper, and good, ripe chunks of tomato. I dressed with a dash of vinegar and a good drizzle of olive oil, and finally a good amount of chopped parsley. yum. and some protein for the vegetarians on our crew.

Speaking of parsley. That is this week's herb. Ana Sortun, of Oleana restaurant, has a good idea for a fancy condiment: parsley oil.

Cherry Tomatoes. Snack. or roast briefly for a candy-like treat.

3 Heads of Lettuce, including one head of Romaine. Caesar Salad! Whoopie! Grill some chicken and bread to make fresh croutons with and you just about have a meal. Have one more tomato sandwich or BLT.

Handful of Hot Peppers. Salsa, chilli, Jamaican Jerk, hot sauce, pickled hots, dry the cayenne.

thanks everyone!

 

 

Posted 9/16/2010 10:04pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hello Farm Friends!

  • Just as we got you all trained on the hours at our farmstand, the northern hemisphere begins to tilt away from the sun . . the Autumnal Equinox is Wednesday, September 22. Day and Night are equal, and thereafter the nights are longer! What I'm trying to say is that it is beginning to get dark before 7 o'clock.

The Hours of the Roadside Stand will be curtailed on Tuesdays and Fridays:

The stand will still open at 3pm, but we will close at sunset.

CSA Members, this is true for your pick-up hours as well.

Saturday Hours will be the same as always, 10am to 2pm.

We plan on being open until the last week in October. Then we will have one more sale just before Thanksgiving. Stay tuned!

 

  • For all you local veggie junkies, check out what our farmer friends are doing: 

Shared Harvest CSA: Locally Grown Vegetables for Winter Eating

 

 

Shared Harvest Winter CSA, a partnership among several small farms, provides locally-grown vegetables for the winter months. Monthly distributions of vegetables take place at Busa Farm in Lexington and at the Bradley Estate in Canton. Two and three month shares are available. What's in the winter share? Apples, dried beans, all kinds of greens, parsnips and 'taters, garlic and leeks and so much more. You will find complete details at www.SharedHarvestCSA.com , including reviews from past shareholders and a subscription form. Contact GrettaAnderson@earthlink.net or 781.507.6602 for additional information.

 

  •  And a reminder to reserve your Thanksgiving Turkey from Brambly Farm:

The O'Harte family of Norfolk raises Bourbon Reds, Royal palms, Bronze Turkeys, all listed Heritage breeds. They also raise Traditional Broad Breasted Whites. They are fed all natural grains and are pasture raised. The Royal Palms are a small type breed and its unusual for them to grow bigger than 14 lbs but they do taste truly delicious. The Bourbon Reds and Bronze can range between 12 - 24lbs and are regarded by many as the best way to give a big family a very special Thanksgiving . 

 

Traditional Broad Breasted Whites usually are between 18-32 lbs. Once in a while there are a few "Extra Large Giant Turkeys" that just forget to stop eating and these can weigh  over 32 lbs.
 
small heritage turkeys 8  / 14 lbs : $65 each 
Medium heritage turkeys   15 / 24 lbs : $80 each
large traditional turkeys  25 / 32 lbs : $95 each
If available "E L G Ts"  over 32 lbs :    $110 each
They will be available on the Monday and Tuesday before Thanksgiving for pick up. 
 
If you would like to reserve a turkey please mail your $25 deposit check, made to Brambly Farm, to:
Brambly Farm
84 Cleveland St
Norfolk, MA 02056
Please include the following information: Your name, phone number, email address, and preference of birds (breed and preferred size). Sooner is better for best selection . . . 

The fresh (not frozen) Turkeys will be available for pick-up the Monday and Tuesday just before Thanksgiving (Nov. 22 &23) here at White Barn Farm. We will send a notice with more details about the pick-up to all who have sent a deposit (really, don't forget your email address!).

  • Enjoy the beautiful quality of light that the autumn days bring us! and make sure to celebrate this week's Full Harvest Moon with some tasty eats!!!

Thank you, as always, for your kind support.
Chris and Christy at
White Barn Farm 

Posted 9/16/2010 6:13pm by christy raymond.

Hey Everyone!

Just wanted to say thank you for the awesome response to the announcement our first farm dinner. The 30 seats were filled as of Sunday at 5pm. There is even a short waiting list! Thank you to everyone who emailed to express their interest even if they couldn't attend. It looks like this could be a promising series for the farm. Our idea is to have one farm dinner a month during the pleasant months of the year. Time will tell . . . 

If you do have a reservation, please park at the site of the Roadside Stand, which is right across the street from the farm, 458 South St. (which is 1A) in Wrentham. We are located between Wampum Corner and the center of Wrentham. You should see the big white tent where we have our stand. Park there and carefully walk across the street to the driveway of the white house with green shutters. As soon as you walk in you'll see the big white barn straight ahead. Look to the left down the hill where a large Ash tree stands, and you should see us.

We will begin welcoming guests at 4pm. As soon as everyone arrives we will take a walk around the farm. The ground can be uneven, so I certainly don't recommend wearing heels for the tour.

Gratuities for our volunteer waitstaff and kitchen help are not expected, but will be accepted.

 

Tentative Menu, created by Chef Maue at Tastings Wine Bar and Bistro:
Green Garden Gazpacho
Narragansett Creamery Mozzarella Curd, Sungold cherry tomatoes, lemon basil buds
Mustard Green Salad
house cured bacon, roasted garlic ranch, ground cherries
Honey Roasted Acorn Squash
spiced butternut squash puree, shaved asiago, crispy sage
Stewed Roasted Pork Butt
Multi colored potatoes, garlic chives, fennel fronds
Vegetarian Entree:
Multi Colored Potato and Tomato Ragu
whipped Narragnsett yogurt
Meg's Pumpkin Pie
honey whipped cream
Every vegetable on the menu is grown at White Barn Farm. The honey is from Roger Franklin Honey (and so are the candles on the table). Bacon and pork is being provided by our friend Floyd at Burnshirt Valley Farm in Barre. Both Roger and Floyd will be sitting at the table, so make sure to say hello!
Again, Thank you, thank you, thank you!
Christy and Chris at White Barn Farm