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Posted 9/18/2009 7:21pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Howdy Friday Shareholders! We hope everyone has been enjoying the veggies, we enjoy growing them for you.

time is flying by this season and for all those keeping track it is week 16.  Six more weeks to go. We are planning for the final CSA week to be the last week in October. Let's hope all the fall crops shape up according to plan! 

Also, a reminder that you are all welcome to come check out your farm this sunday sept. 20, 3pm-6pm. Park where you usually pick up. look both ways crossing 1A and meet us in front of the barn. we'll continuously guide tours around the farm as people come and go.

Today's Share:

Cucumbers...slice em dice em eat em up yum
 
Potatoes.....my favorite to grow and to eat.  3 lbs yellow and/or blue potatoes. we always suggest slice them up coat with olive oil salt pepper and herbs lay on cookie sheet and bake at 375 until tender then broil for a couple of minutes for some nice crisp chips

Sweet Peppers lots of different colors and sizes this week we tried to give you guys some good peppers to stuff, a lot of people have been suggesting stuffed peppers for dinner entrees. Roasting sweet peppers is still a great suggestion. Roasted peppers can be a wonderful flavoring for a hummus or feta spread. I wanted to make sure everyone tries the Jimmy Nardello's frying pepper. They are extra sweet and delicious. a fancy appetizer could be these whole roasted peppers stuffed with a cheese and herb stuffing (perhaps feta, perhaps boursin - which can be made with butter, cream cheese, garlic and herbs in a food processor). One member was going to go home and roll up chicken breasts with cheese and roasted red peppers, kind of cordon bleu style. sounds awesome.

Celery is the herb this week. the stalks are not meant to be eaten as celery sticks. But there is a very intense flavor in this celery. Finely diced and sauteed with onions and carrots, it makes an excellent soup base. you could even look up a cream of celery soup recipe. or a beef stew. or for roasted chicken. stuffing. finely chopped in a burger or a meat sauce for pasta. if you are feeling thrifty and crafty, bunch the good looking leaves and hang the bundle upside down somewhere dry and out of the sun. when crispy, crumble them into a little airtight jar. The dried celery leaves will add excellent flavor to any stock or soup all winter.

Shallots. Shallots can be such a magic ingredient. A fine dice for salad dressings and homemade mayonaise is key. i'd suggest googling shallot vinaigrette. A homemade mayo would be good on a potato salad or in deviled eggs. I have a Southeastern Asian soup recipe that calls for dry roasted shallots - which is done in their skins on a hot dry cast iron skillet, blackening the outsides until they are tender and pop out of their skins. This tasty little product could be thrown in a fancy sandwich, in an omelet, on a pizza.

Cipollini Onions. Dr. Gourmet knows what they're about: http://www.drgourmet.com/ingredients/cipolini.shtml
The Proud Italian Cook knows how to best showcase their special qualitiies: http://prouditaliancook.blogspot.com/2008/07/balsamic-glazed-cipollini-onions-and.html

Carrots. Big Tasty Carrots! Raw is super. Shredded on a salad is super. As the base for a bolognese they are perfect. Roasted carrots are delicious - the old cookie sheet in the oven idea. I'd peel and slice the carrots, perhaps on a bias so there are more substantial pieces, toss on the sheet with olive oil, salt, pepper, and maybe some fresh herbs. 400 or so - Flip once with a spatula. when fork tender - voila! there are also nice ideas for sauteed carrots with honey ginger glazes and whatnot. matchstick sized pieces are nice to put in a stir fry - get crazy with your kitchen knife skills! if you're really good try sushi. and what about carrot cake? or muffins. cupcakes. carrot ginger soup?

lettuce. wash, spin, serve. try making a dressing with the shallot! cucumbers, sweet peppers, and shredded carrot is a pretty nice salad. crumbled feta on top is a nice touch. greek salad wrap is a good lunch. consider quick pickling your hungarian hots and roasting your peppers to really go the extra mile!

summer squash. these crops are on their way out. we hope you enjoy these delicate little guys. same as usual. 

hot peppers. here is a good way to keep hots on hand. the thai hots and cayenne also dry very well. serranos are super in a salsa verde.
PICKLED PEPPERS

1 lb peppers (seeded and cut into rings - I mix hot and sweet)
2 large shallots (sliced and separated into rings)

2 cups white wine vinegar (I actually used regular white last time and it was fine)
1/2 cup sugar
3 tblsps water
5 sprigs of thyme
2 garlic cloves sliced
1/4 teasp dried crushed red pepper
pinch of coarse salt

Bring above 6 ingredients to boil and pour over peppers/shallots in bowl. Cover the bowl for 5 mins, then let cool to room temp. Transfer to quart jar and refrigerate 4 hours.

Enjoy...they are both easy and very good...

tomatillos. papery husk. tomato looking green fruit inside. wikipedia has an enlightening entry about this vegetable: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomatillo  I would make a little salsa verde with the tomatillos, white onions, serranos and chicken stock. this cooked green sauce pairs wonderfully well with enchiladas, especially spinach, cheese, and shredded chicken. One dedicated farmstand shopper who happens to live in the house I grew up in suggested a chicken recipe with tomatillos from Mario Batali. I adore Mario and so I googled it and found a good description. You guys only got one and a half pounds but i think you can modify the recipe and still make a wonderful dish. so while at the market pick up some garlic, limes, chicken thighs and cilantro. check out the article at http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2007/09/unclogged-mario-batali-recipe-chicken-with-green-sauce.html

melons. no one complained about the melon in last week's box. i really am curious! But I hope they were all fine and you got to try a watermelon this week. Maybe next year will be the killer melon season.


Folks! We love having such a happy band of members. You are all so pleasant to see each week. Thank you for your support and dedication to eating your veggies. I have been hearing lots of tales of summer goodness put up for winter meals. One member told me today she just bought a freezer! As usual, the tales of children loving to eat fresh organic veggies always warms my heart, too. Go real carrots!
Posted 9/15/2009 10:04pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
oh hello tuesday share members of white barn farm;

i hope everyone has been enjoying the veggies, we enjoy growing them for you.

time is flying by this season and for all those keeping track it is week 16.  Six more weeks to go. We are planning for the final CSA week to be the last week in October. Let's hope all the fall crops shape up according to plan!

Also, a reminder that you are all welcome to come check out your farm this sunday sept. 20, 3pm-6pm. Park where you usually pick up. look both ways crossing 1A and meet us in front of the barn. we'll continuously guide tours around the farm as people come and go.

this is what was in your box:

Cucumbers...the variety of cucumbers picked for you this week is called green finger, it has delicate skin (therefore more susceptible to damage) and great taste, add to your salad; cube it, slice it, or shred it and enjoy.  Also my favorite food is pickles and there are quick pickling recipes across the internet for pickle veterans or rookies.
 
Potatoes.....my favorite to grow and to eat.  This week you got a mix and match 2 lbs. bag of red white and blue potatoes.  with this array of shapes sizes and colors slice them up coat with olive oil salt pepper and herbs lay on cookie sheet and bake at 375 until tender then broil for a couple of minutes for some nice crisp chips

Sweet Peppers lots of different colors and sizes this week we tried to give you guys some good peppers to stuff, a lot of people have been suggesting stuffed peppers for dinner entrees. Roasting sweet peppers is still a great suggestion. Roasted peppers can be a wonderful flavoring for a hummus or feta spread. 

Basil. This is probably the last week for basil.

Shallots. Shallots can be such a magic ingredient. A fine dice for salad dressings and homemade mayonaise is key. i'd suggest googling shallot vinaigrette. A homemade mayo would be good on a potato salad or in deviled eggs. I have a Southeastern Asian soup recipe that calls for dry roasted shallots - which is done in their skins on a hot dry cast iron skillet, blackening the outsides until they are tender and pop out of their skins. This tasty little product could be thrown in a fancy sandwich, in an omelet, on a pizza.

Carrots. Big Tasty Carrots! Raw is super. Shredded on a salad is super. As the base for a bolognese they are perfect. Roasted carrots are delicious - the old cookie sheet in the oven idea. I'd peel and slice the carrots, perhaps on a bias so there are more substantial pieces, toss on the sheet with olive oil, salt, pepper, and maybe some fresh herbs. 400 or so - Flip once with a spatula. when fork tender - voila! there are also nice ideas for sauteed carrots with honey ginger glazes and whatnot. matchstick sized pieces are nice to put in a stir fry - get crazy with your kitchen knife skills! if you're really good try sushi. and what about carrot cake? or muffins. cupcakes.

lettuce. wash, spin, serve. try making a dressing with the shallot! cucumbers, sweet peppers, and shredded carrot is a pretty nice salad. crumbled feta on top is a nice touch. greek salad wrap is a good lunch. consider quick pickling your hungarian hots and roasting your peppers to really go the extra mile!

summer squash. these crops are on their way out. we hope you enjoy these delicate little guys. same as usual. 

hot peppers. Lime green Hungarian Hot Wax and a new one, Habanero - crumpled little flourescent orange. very hot!!! If you cut it up, wash your hands afterwards, or if you want wear gloves or a sandwich bag on your hands to avoid the very hot oils that you must never touch to your eyes or sensitive skin parts. perfect for a hot fresh salsa. great for homemade hot sauce - the sauce could be balanced by sweet carrots and sweet peppers. i usually add some tomatoes and lots of vinegar. I'm sure the interweb is full of great recipes. Al Forno makes their own habanero sausage that is roasted with littleneck clams, onions, white wine, tomato and a little butter. What a broth! Hot and delicious. served with rich mashed potatoes for balance. Here are two recipes that a great farmstand shopper emailed to me:

Jerk Chicken Marinade

Jerk Marinade
1 tablespoon ground allspice
1 tablespoon dried thyme
1 1/2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons black pepper
1 1/2teaspoons ground sage
¾ teaspoon ground nutmeg
¾teaspoon ground cinnamon
2cloves garlic, minced
1teaspoon ground ginger
1/2teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 tablespoon brown sugar or molasses
¼ cup soy sauce
¼ cup olive oil
¾ cup white vinegar
½ cup orange juice
Juice of 1 lime
1 habanero pepper, seeded if desired to reduce heat
3 scallions, roughly chopped
2 medium white onions (1 cup), roughly chopped
Place all ingredients in a blender and puree.

I put this in a ziploc with 3 or so pounds of chicken cut into bite size pieces for overnight, then grill.

PICKLED PEPPERS

1 lb peppers (seeded and cut into rings - I mix hot and sweet)
2 large shallots (sliced and separated into rings)

2 cups white wine vinegar (I actually used regular white last time and it was fine)
1/2 cup sugar
3 tblsps water
5 sprigs of thyme
2 garlic cloves sliced
1/4 teasp dried crushed red pepper
pinch of coarse salt

Bring above 6 ingredients to boil and pour over peppers/shallots in bowl. Cover the bowl for 5 mins, then let cool to room temp. Transfer to quart jar and refrigerate 4 hours.

Enjoy...they are both easy and very good...


melons. no one complained about the melon in last week's box. i really am curious! But I hope they were all fine and you got to try a watermelon this week. Maybe next year will be the killer melon season.

soy beans. lots of positive feedback. good nutty taste, right? this should be the last week for fresh soybeans. it's like the peanut of fresh vegetables.
 
Folks! We love having such a happy band of members. You are all so pleasant to see each week. Thank you for your support and dedication to eating your veggies. I have been hearing lots of tales of summer goodness put up for winter meals. One member told me today she just bought a freezer! As usual, the tales of children loving to eat fresh organic veggies always warms my heart, too. Go real carrots!
Posted 9/12/2009 6:23am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

The weather report is showing that rain and thunderstorms are likely this morning. We can withstand rain, but the lightning is a little dangerous for us and our customers. We have decided to postpone our normal Saturday morning market until tomorrow morning. So here is the message:

WHITE BARN FARMSTAND WILL BE CLOSED SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
WE WILL BE OPEN TOMORROW, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13. SAME HOURS: 10AM - 2PM 
We apologize to anyone who goes out in the rain looking for us! We'd also like to take this chance to thank all of you faithful customers who have made our year so rewarding. We have had so much fun sharing new vegetables and recipes and getting to know everyone who comes back week to week. Thank you so much! We apologize for any inconvenience this last minute change causes.

We'll be available by cell phone if you have any questions or dinner party ingredient emergencies 774-210-0359 

Posted 9/12/2009 6:21am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

The weather report is showing that rain and thunderstorms are likely this morning. We can withstand rain, but the lightning is a little dangerous for us and our customers. We have decided to postpone our normal Saturday morning market until tomorrow morning. So here is the message:

WHITE BARN FARMSTAND WILL BE CLOSED SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
WE WILL BE OPEN TOMORROW, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13. SAME HOURS: 10AM - 2PM 
We apologize to anyone who goes out in the rain looking for us! We'd also like to take this chance to thank all of you faithful customers who have made our year so rewarding. We have had so much fun sharing new vegetables and recipes and getting to know everyone who comes back week to week. Thank you so much! We apologize for any inconvenience this last minute change causes.

We'll be available by cell phone if you have any questions or dinner party ingredient emergencies 774-210-0359 

Posted 9/11/2009 9:15pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
hi everyone!

what to do with soybeans ? check out http://www.wikihow.com/Cook-Edamame We harvested the whole plants so you can see how they grow and get to know an organic soybean plant. it should be a fun family event to take the pods off the plants (stay productive in front of the tube if you like) then you have a healthy snack or starter or side dish. this is basically a little novelty for this week. We hope you have fun with it!

why the tomatoes? we are not perfect farmers, folks. we should have disposed of our whole second planting of tomatoes at the first sign of blight, but we just haven't had time. all the potato foliage and the first planting of tomatoes are far underground, but the second planting is still growing and has some pretty healthy fresher growth on it with the help of the dry weather and full sun of recent weeks. There are a few varieties persevering - matt's wild is that teeny tiny red cherry tomato with truly a wilder heritage. Striped German is also holding up pretty well (an enormous yellow heirloom that blushes red on the bottom when ripe and is all stripey inside). No recovery in sight, but by combining with the cherry tomatoes we have growing in our little hoophouse we have been able to send along some token tomatoes to all the shareholders. we have high hopes for next year.

blue potatoes. i find they make excellent oven roasted potatoes. I have particularly enjoyed them sliced pretty thinly in rounds, tossed with olive oil, salt, pepper, and roasted in a 425 degree oven 20 minutes or so. flip them with a flat metal spatula halfway through cooking to crisp both sides. Chopped rosemary is a really nice herb. I have heard positive reports about blue mashed potatoes, but I tend to think their firmer texture is probably best for roasting.

Beets are Back. the tops are so-so, but if you are desperate for a cooking green (like as a filling for green enchiladas?) use the good looking greens. roasted beets can be such a delight. I like roasting a bunch, peeling them at my leisure, cubing or slicing, and then storing them in a quick homemade balsamic vinagirette in an airtight container in the fridge. They are lovely just like that, or paired with salad greens and a nice cheese, or some avocado or just a fine dice of red onions. I just heard of a kind of cool midwestern tradition - pickled eggs and beets. imagine that for an easter gift. beet dyed eggs. for pickled beet and pickled egg lovers only.

it is the week of questionable melons. cantaloupe or honeydew? under or over ripe? don't judge a melon by its cover. i find the scent is the best indicator. melon picking is  tough and our melon patch is a little sad. it was no picnic for melons this season, but we put one in each share this week. we hope that some of them are transcendental. if they seem very firm and don't have much essence emanating from the stem end, let them develop for a day or two on the counter. if they are softer and smelling s trongly - eat it this instant! if it is already ripe the fridge is good. if not, the counter is good. if your melon is plain old rotten, we apologize and tell us next week. we hope to have a few spares next tuesday to fill your melon appetite. although a great melon needs no enhancement, some traditional combinations are: melon cubes wrapped in prosciutto or just with a sprinkle of salt, melon and mint, melon, feta and mint. if you are crazy creative you could try to make a granita or gelato. the best gelato I have ever tasted was melon gelato in Bologna.

cooking celery. our celery crop is not approaching anything close to ants-on-a-log-ability, but let me assure you that our celery has concentrated flavor! This is your herb this week. a fine dice of this celery, along with some onions and carrots is the perfect beginning to a classic sauce or stew. these cool nights are bringing back the right mood for this sort of flavor. how about a soup? if you don't want to use the leaves, hang them upside down in a bunch somewhere dry and out of the sun. celery leaf is a wonderful herb to have in your cabinet for flavoring soups and stocks all winter. (once it's dry it can be crumbled and kept in an airtight jar). celery is good in stir-fries and finely diced in a burger if you are not the mirepoix type. wikipedia is so excellent for all of your mysterious share items. when i slack on emails i think it could be your answer!

peppers. roasting peppers takes a little time and is a little tedious with peeling and seeding the cooked peppers, but very rewarding in terms of flavor and aromas filling your kitchen.  I like putting peppers on a cookie sheet and putting them under the broiler. i wait until the skins blister, turn them over, let the other side blister, then turn off the oven and take them out to cool. when they can be touched you can peel off the skins, take off the stem and push the seeds out. at this point you have a delicacy. last year i successfully cut them into strips, packed them into little artichoke jars, covered with olive oil and refrigerated right through to march. these are great on a pizza or sandwich or greek salad or just as an antipasto with nice bread and real, good ricotta. I had the privilege of having dinner Saturday night in Cambridge at Oleana (excellent, original, wonderful ambience) oleanarestaurant.com Anyway, one of the appetizers included a roasted red pepper whipped feta spread. We had brought along a box of unprepared food as our "contribution" to Sunday's BBQ at Chris' brother's place in Somerville. I was so inspired by the spread that I roasted a tray of those Jimmy Nardello red peppers (sweet but spicy looking). I threw in a few serranos for heat. i pureed the peeled and seeded roasted peppers in a food processor, then added feta. I have a feeling a whisk in the kitchen aid mixer would yield a closer resemblance to Oleana's spread, but it was a major hit at the party. i did use a little sour cream to make it blend better and tasted for salt and pepper and added just a few more hits of tabasco. i served it with cubed focaccia from Trader Joe's. Sweet red peppers are also perfect in a salad or a stir fry. onions and peppers and a patty pan are a nice base for spicy rice and beans or a pasta with garlic, cheeses, lemon, and capers.

hot peppers. green, pointy serranos and longer red cayenne. cayennes are good to dry if you want to have your own powder.

lettuce. still coming! can you believe it?

eggplants. i know many of you are tired of them. for some reason, we have lots. we would rather give you the opportunity to use them rather than just directly compost them. if you choose to compost them, no big whoop. One CSA member reported that her breakthrough recipe was to just sautee diced eggplant with onions and olive oil. Indian cuisine has some nice eggplant opportunities. freezing breaded fried slices or freezing cubed pieces lightly fried with a dusting of flour have both been reported. Baba ganouj is a fairly straight forward process and a tasty dip - we had a woman buy 2 cases of our eggplants so she could bake a bunch of eggplants to freeze. She takes them out and makes baba all winter. eggplant caponata also freezes well. i heard my friend Mario Batali has a good caponata recipe. google. or . . My aunt's cousin, Elena, sent me this recipe:

ELENA’S CAPONATA RECIPE

 

1 medium eggplant, diced (about 6-8 cups of eggplant); I leave the skin on, but that’s optional

1 small onion, diced

4 or 5 cloves of garlic, diced

1 green or red pepper, diced

1 small can of sliced mushrooms (I chop them a couple of times to make smaller pieces)

 

Heat about 2/3 of a cup of olive oil in a large skillet and saute all this for about 10 minutes, stirring a couple of times (until everything starts to get soft).

 

Add:

1 cup of chopped green olives

1 can of tomato paste

1/4 cup of water

1 ½ t. sugar

2 T. wine vinegar

1 t. salt

½ t. oregano

black pepper

 

Cook on low heat for about 15 more minutes, stirring well with a wooden spoon to incorporate the tomato paste throughout the mixture.   Refrigerate and serve at room temperature.  It will last in the refrigerator for at least a week.

 

Be sure to make the caponata at least a day ahead to give all the flavors a chance to blend.  (All ingredient amounts are flexible, so add more or less of anything according to your taste.  Once in a while I add some celery to the vegetables at the beginning or some capers at the end—depending on my mood!!)

 

BON APPETITO!!


onions.  a staple to any recipe, this years onion crop looks great and there should be plenty more where that came from.

patty pan squash.  a great summer squash different shape but great taste, i have found this squash slightly more tender then our other yellow squash, this can be added to any dish, my favorite is fresh pasta with garlic and olive oil.  So simple yet so good.

well enjoy the share today its a little different but really highlights all the cool things we can grow in new england.  PEACE LOVE FARM.
 

 
Posted 8/26/2009 7:05am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hi everyone!

Let's see. This week's share brought:

red onion. a little more pungent than the fresh onion bunches you were gettting. these should last for a little bit in a basket on your counter. diced red onion is such a nice addition to salsas or any composed salad. try diced red onion, diced cucumbers, feta cheese, and maybe some cherry tomatoes from somewhere else.

carrots. try looking up a recipe for honey-glazed carrots. roasted carrots are also delicious - cut at an angle to make a good sized bite, tossed on a baking sheet with olive oil, salt and pepper and perhaps fresh rosemary and in a 375 degree oven for twenty minutes or until they are done. consider carrot cake or fresh muffins.

scallions. i like to sautee the whites with a little olive oil mixed with a pat of butter. I used that, some white onion, a diced patty pan and chicken stock as a base for a simple tomato soup I made the other night. I had canned some pretty brothy tomato soup last year so I got the scallion squash mix softened and used an immersion blender to puree the mix coarsely (not too smooth). then i added my thin tomato soup, and finished it with chopped scallion tops and chopped basil leaves. served with a dollop of sour cream and voila! we used some scallion greens melted with cheese in simple quesadillas for the side.

peppers. the sweet peppers are beginning to take on their colors. There are three types of sweet red peppers in the share - they are not perfectly red, but if you leave them on the counter they will continue to turn red. there is a bell shaped one, a large pointy one that is a pimiento variety, and several skinny little twisty red pointy ones named jimmy Nardello's sweet Italian frying pepper. These are all great in a stir fry, on the grill, on a salad, or roasted. Roasting takes a little work but is delicious, especially as a little specialty to put on a sandwich or serve on good bread with a soft cheese. My method is usually in the little toaster oven so I don't have to turn on the whole oven. I throw them on a baking sheet dry and set the oven to broil. when the skins are blackened you can turn them over and let the other side blister. when they are cool enough to touch, peel the skins off and remove the seeds (it's a little slimy). at this point the peppers can be stored in a little jar covered with olive oil and will keep in your fridge for many months. There are also Poblano peppers in your share - these are nice roasted, too. traditionaly, they are stuffed for chile rellenos. For hot peppers this week the pointy dark green little cylindrical ones are Serrano - very hot. there are also hungarian hot wax lime green peppers - also quite hot.

cucumbers. cucumber salads. look up a recipe for cucumber soup - I heard there is a good one in Food & Wine this month. Try cucumber sticks for snacking instead of chips. They are an excellent vehicle for lots of dips, and especially Baba Ganouj - the eggplant spread I recommend you make with this week's eggplant extravaganza.

squash. yellow squash. scarce zucchini. and the UFO looking "flying saucer" Patty Pan. These can all be grilled, sauteed, etc. the patty pans just require a different slicing method. I have been enjoying frying up onions, peppers, diced squash, and maybe leftover green beans with peanuts if I am making something to go on rice, or hot peppers if I am making a topping for tortillas baked with cheese, salsa, and scallions. squash and basil go very nicely together.

Eggplants. i finally tried the Baba Ganouj. there is a recipe posted on the Recipe Blog. it is really delicious. a good dip when you are starving and waiting for dinner to cook. would also make a great spread for a veggie roll up with shredded carrot, diced cukes, diced red pepper, lettuce, scallion greens, and chopped basil or parsley. Baked eggplant with tomato cheeses and herbs is very nice and less work than breading and frying slices - which is also great. a good cold lunch is a leftover slice of fried eggplant, a slice of tomato, torn basil, mozzarella, and a drizzle of pesto. I read about a cool idea - little sandwiches with basil and cream cheese between two thin slices of eggplant all breaded and fried together. sounds like a fancy treat or dinner party first course. There is always ratatouille, caponata (mario batali had a good lookin recipe on the food network website), or an Asian-style spicy eggplant dish. If you decide to fry a bunch you can freeze the fried slices and take them out whenever you want.

Pole Beans. These are Kentucky Wonder Pole Beans. they are a green bean and can be prepared the same way as some of the other varieties you've been getting.  I find boiling doesn't do anything to enhance this vegetable, but some folks won't eat beans unless they are army green. I really enjoyed cooking them with olive oil, slices of garlic, salt, and chopped peanuts - I put a cover over the pan so they would steam a little also. snapping the ends of beans is a good job for kids.

Lettuce

Basil

I think that is all! We hope you enjoy and welcome your recipe ideas - especially for our bumper crop of eggplants. Just email any ideas along. Everyone would love to hear!



 
Posted 8/19/2009 8:30am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hello Tuesday Members!

It is hot.  The eggplants like it. Let's hope our melons start to take off, too. We are seeding fall crops these days, always thinking ahead. The angle of sunlight is beginning to shift a little bit; sun shines right into the farmstand on Tuesday evenings. But let's glory in this hot piece of summer. Hooray for everyone who visited the stand yesterday wearing just a bathing suit and T-shirt - and there were lots of you!

What was in the box?

2.5 lbs Ailsa Craig onions. They are starting to become more pungent, preparing themselves with storing qualities.  They will still make fabulous grilled or roasted onions if you want to feature them, or we all know every sautee or stir fry is enhanced by beginning with onions.  The chefs we sell to have been featuring the onions as a side with Aquidneck steak. I dream of caramelizing these onions - I really want to make a savory tart with caramelized onions, herbs, and goat cheese. They would also be great on a homemade pizza or focaccia or just mixed with sour cream to make a french onion dip and served with veggie sticks.

Yellow Squash. I finally added a couple posts on the recipe blog. One is for parmesan squash cakes from Eating Well. Sounds like an elegant side dish for our humble friend, yellow squash. Someone mentioned dicing all of their squash, tossing with a little olive oil, adding a little salt and pepper and a sprinkling of parmesan and just roasting them in a casserole in the oven.

Zucchini. Our next planting is starting to bear so hopefully these plants will be healthier and more productive and we can flip flop the yellow squash to zucchini ratio . . .

Cucumber. Same for cukes. Our next planting looks very healthy, they are trellised and mulched with straw. I am hoping they like this treatment. We have true pickling cukes, little round yellow ones called "Lemon," and nice long slicers, "Marketmore." This week is a little gap between our plantings, but we threw in one slicer for everyone to put on a salad, make into sticks for dipping in baba ganouj or french onion dip, or dice into tuna salad, my new favorite.

Pole Beans. these are called "Rattlesnake"  they are green beans with a little red coloring on the outside. Prepare just like green beans. I am dying to recreate an experience i had with a spicy peanut sauce on green beans. We have lots of things for a Thai-style green curry: onion, green pepper, zucchini, green beans, basil, jalapeno. I would just look up a nice recipe or even follow the instructions on a Thai kitchen jar of curry paste.

Eggplants. holy smokes. i hope we have not entered eggplant overload. Monday night yielded an unbelievable harvest of seemingly millions of large eggplants - two varieties of Asian eggplants, Striped Calliope Italian eggplant, classic old Black Beauty, the heirloom white and purple tinged Rosa Bianca, even the purpler Nadia, and light purple, Beatrice. They all decided to come out in force at once. In response, after closing up the stand last night and before accidentally falling asleep on the floor - I made a pretty good fried eggplant dish. I used two large Italian eggplants, sliced in rounds. I got the stovetop griddle going with a coating of canola oil, then dipped the slices in beaten egg, then Panko bread crumbs (awesome Japanese bread crumbs for frying - Ocean State Job Lot sells it in bags, Whole Foods sells it in the bulk section for sure). Fry to golden brown on both sides. I had to add another dash of oil hear and there - perhaps eggplant is one of the most absorbent vegetables! As they came off the griddle I had a casserole dish ready with a thin coating of olive oil on the bottom. I put a layer of eggplants, then slices of fresh tomato (someone has got to have them) then torn leaves, a drizzle of olive oil over that, broken up slices of mozzarella, salt and pepper, then another layer of the same, ending with eggplant on top. I put the whole thing, covered with foil in the oven or 20 minutes or so - enough time to do most of the dishes and wash a head of lettuce. Then i removed the foil, grated fresh parmesan on the top and put it back in for five minutes. It came out fabulous. Another good tip - the baba ganouj recipe is on the recipe blog now. it calls for roasting the eggplant. My cousin made an awesome version with grilled Asian eggplants - skin and all into the food processor - you could really taste the grilled flavor.

Lettuce. salad mania. the roasted beet salad is really a good one. try it with some goat cheese.

Peppers: one green bell - pretty standard. three little lime-green sweet frying peppers called Cubanelle. These are larger, more squat, less pointy than the hot peppers in your share, Hungarian Hot Wax. There are also jalapeno peppers, which are pretty mild in the world of hot peppers. These would be perfect diced up for a homemade guacamole or fresh salsa. Hot peppers are always good for chilli. The frying peppers are nice fried up with the white onions to serve with good sausage. Or try roasting them. lots of people have talked about stuffing peppers. Maybe another week we will put in enough to make stuffing more worthwhile.

Dill. I have been trying to grow dill this whole time. I really wanted to have it at the same time as a big share of cucumbers - but alas. If you do have cukes left from another week a real easy salad is just sliced or diced cucumbers, salt, pepper, chopped dill, a squeeze of lemon and sour cream. Dill is really good with fish - white fish or salmon, in particular, or in deviled eggs or a homemade salad dressing. You can put some clean, dry sprigs in a bottle of vinegar if you like to have flavored vinegars for a condiment.

Basil. Big batch, again. This can sit out on the counter in a jar of water, but is best whizzed up in the food processor with a bunch of olive oil and some salt. Then it can be frozen and brought out for whenever you want. Try a pasta with pesto. Put it on a grilled chicken sandwich. Use your imagination.

Arugula. A little bag of that peppery salad green from the spring. 

Turnip Greens. a little bunch of greens. sautee with garlic and olive oil for a treat somewhere between spinach and kale.

Beets. Roasting is so delicious. boiling isn't bad. try fresh grated on a salad for something different. There is a wonderful chocolate cake recipe out there with beets for the secret ingredient. 

That's all I can remember. Do feel free to email if you have any questions and especially if you have good recipe ideas! Thanks again! Stay well everyone!




 
Posted 8/12/2009 10:48pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
well folks another great box today, hope that you all are enjoying your meals with some fantastic veggies.  before we begin this week's description of the share both christy and i would love to say thank you for such great feedback we feel truly blessed by all an appreciate the support.

in the box this week;

1 bunch of white spring onions (alisa craigs)-These are fresh spring onions great for cooking or eating raw in a salad, unlike onions that have been cured there is a much sweeter flavor and can compliment any dish.  We would suggest trying to carmalize (slow cooking, with a little brown sugar) these onions for maximum sweetness.  This is white barn farm version of a sweet vidala onion, enjoy.

1 bunch of red torpedo onions- This is not new to the share, and because it is the season for grilling keep coating these with olive oil, salt and pepper and they will add flavor, shape, shape and color to any backyard BBQ.  Another option for these onions if to pan fry them with your bell peppers and throw them on your fajitas or burritos.  

2 lbs of Yellow summer squash- This is years yellow squash harvest has been pretty steady and there is nothing like fresh summer squash.  If you havent tried eating them raw i would suggest taking your smaller ones slicing them up real thin and throwing them on top of your summer time salad, you can truly taste the tenderness of these little gems.  Another great grilling preperation is slicing up squash, zuchini, and onions in rounds coating with olive oil salt pepper, wrapping in tin foil, but before you close up the tinfoil make sure to throw some butter in there allong with fresh basil, sage, rosemary or any other herbs that you like. put on grill and cook until tender.

1 patty pan squash- a new share item we did not grow a lot of these but they are a nice addition to the box, this is a summer squash dont feel intimaded by the shape and size however you prefer to cook your squash or zucinni you can cook this the same way, just add to the mix and enjoy.

1 zuchini - this could be the week to try some frying with lots of kind of eggplants in the share this week i would try slicing these in rounds or sticks coat with egg and bread crumbs and fry them in pan.  And dont forget it your making pasta with red sauce this week throw some fresh zuchini in the sauce you will find these tender morasals a real treat.

2.5 lbs of eggplant (asian and italian)  Skinny oblong shaped dark and light purple are the asian, perfect for stir fry.  We have also found this another great grilling experience, lets enjoy this weather and cook outside.  The italian eggplants may look a little different than what you are sold in the super market, but let me tell you they taste better, for dinner the other night we slice our italian eggplant in rounds coated with egg then breadcrumbs and fried them to top our pasta dish. if anyone has a good recipe for babaganoosh please email us and we will pass it on.

2 green Bell peppers- As we wait for our peppers to turn red, orange and yellow our appetite should be filled with green peppers.  I would suggest eating these raw to add a nice fresh crunch to your summer salad.  Or fry them up with your spring onions add to sausage, or top your burgers (Veggie or meat).

1 Bunch of carrots- Carrots, what else can you say these may not las in your fridge very long, personally my favorite way to eat a carrot is cut the top wipe that dirt and enjoy they taste especially great in the field for a 5 o clock snack. If you are going to cook with them they taste great in soups, and make a great base for boulinese sauce.

1 Bunch of basil-   people ask us all the time what is the best way to keep basil in the fridge?, well here is our answer: olive oil. To make a pesto, put the clean, dry leaves in a food processor with a good amount of olive oil. add a little salt and you can store the puree just like that. it can be frozen or just refrigerated. to make sure none of it turns brown, smooth the surface in your container and put a thin layer of olive oil over the top.At this point it can be used as a spread or for a pasta. I suggest adding it to cooked pasta, along with parmesan and toasted nuts. Pesto can be used on sandwiches, with a marinade for veggies, on garlic bread, stuffed under the skin of a roasted chicken, added to a red sauce, a soup, or an egg scramble. Use your imagination.  Another storage method is to pack the clean dry leaves into a little jar and fill with good olive oil. 

the little peppers this week are hot: lime green Hungarian Hot Wax. and little pointy green Serranos. Hope you like to spice up a few dishes!

Hope you all have a great week! 
Posted 8/8/2009 5:44am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Howdy Folks!

I just wrote half of this email sitting at the stand and then lost it. let's see if it can be found again . . .

Potatoes. yukon gold. our potatoes have all succumbed to late blight (the disease affects just potatoes and tomatoes - we shall not be pulling the late blight excuse on any more crops). we are trying to avoid them spoiling so we are not washing them after harvest. Water and the cool, dark root cellar are too favorable for rot. We recommend that you use the potatoes promptly and keep them in the fridge, washing them only just before cooking.

Three heads of lettuce - green leaf, red leaf, and romaine. salad, burgers, sandwiches, oh my.

String Beans. the newcomer today! I've had the most success blanching beans before any other treatments. Blanching is just dunking the beans in salted boiling water until they are brightly colored and just tender. then they are dunked in ice water to keep them from cooking any further - if you want to be real professional about it.  My aunt brought over a nice dish last night for dinner. blanched beans tossed in the serving dish with good olive oil, fresh garlic, a little balsamic, and a chiffonade of mint leaves. In a sautee pan with chunks of garlic is always a hit. and there are great opportunities for spicy peanut sauce.

Green peppers are another new sight in your share. We haven't chosen to grow any peppers specifically for harvest as green peppers - these are all immature versions of nice colored peppers. But the plants looked like they could use some thinning, and fried onions and peppers are good.

Cucumbers. slice em, dice em, include them in a tabouli salad. mix them with feta and cherry tomatoes and fresh basil or parsley. 

Zucchini. Summer Squash. Patty Pans. I've heard cubed, tossed with olive oil, salt and pepper, and roasted in the oven, topped with parmesan and covered with foil. just for a new idea.

Eggplants. We made a stir fry with just long slices of eggplant, making sure to coat them with oil right after cutting so they didn't brown. My dad went nuts when we used some leftover grilled eggplant on tostadas with grated cheddar, grilled onions and squash, with fresh salsa and sour cream. Someone was talking about a nice recipe with roasted diced eggplant, red pepper, orzo pasta, olive oil, feta and basil. Eggplant can be salted before cooking to draw out its bitterness.

Fresh onions. these get real sweet when they are cooked. whether grilled or roasted on their own or just a part of any other dish. sautee them up with the green peppers and serve with spicy sausage.  these would be nice to carmelize and use on a pizza, foccacia, or little onion, herb, and goat cheese tart.

Beets. the chioggia beets are candy striped inside when you cut them raw. after they've cooked they tend to be pink. very sweet. if you remember from earlier this season - they are great roasted. We got a nice suggestion to try making a rosti out of them - par boiled, grated, and kind of fried in a cake - it's a twist on the Swiss dish traditionally made with potatoes. look up a good recipe. you could probably do something neat with zucchini and squash too. i think it would be important to get some initial moisture out, though.

Hot peppers. jalapeno - mildest. hungarian hot wax - great in rings, fried up and on a sandwich. serrano - very spicy. diced red onion, finely minced hot pepper, lime juice and cilantro is an excellent base for any fresh salsa. try using leftover sweet corn, sliced off the cob to add some sweetness.

Herbs: parsley, mint, dill, basil, thai basil. the spice of life. thai basil tends to pair nicely with any sort of dish you would find at a Thai restaurant. I always add basil at the last minute if i'm adding it to something hot and usually try to make sure it is immediately coated with oil. perhaps rice paper wrappers or a stir fry with chopped peanuts. a quick sauce to make for simple sauteed vegetables is fresh chopped garlic, lime juice, soy sauce, and a dash of balsamic vinegar - a squirt of hot sauce and/or a teaspoon of honey are optional. always taste to adjust.


Have a splendid weekend everyone!

Take Care, Christy and Chris


 
Posted 7/31/2009 10:31pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hey everyone! Thank you for all of your kind support, everybody. It has been fun getting to know everyone throughout the rainy Fridays of 2009. I feel like lots of us discussed the tomato situation this year. There was a good Globe article that explains the scale of the situation. Like most tomato growers in New England this year, our plants have late blight. We have three generations of tomato plants - the last are supposed to be planted next week. They don't have signs of disease but almost certainly will succumb. As organic growers who have chosen not to spray any fungicides (even certified organic copper sprays) at the farm, our only option has been sanitation and disease prevention.  We meticulously grew all of our own starts from seed, monitoring their health, boosting immunity with a spray of fish and seaweed emusion,  planting them out by hand, staking them so their leaves would not be on the soil, pruning the suckers on sunny days (these were rare and we pounced on them in the name of tomato health) to promote good air circulation, staking them as they grew more and more. We laid drip lines in case it ever stops raining, and finally mulched with straw to prevent soil splash from spreading disease. A few weeks ago I noticed the first signs of blight on the oldest leaves - brown lesions. When I saw the white fuzz on the underside of the leaf that distinguishes this fungus, I resigned myself to disposing of all of the affected plants. That meant cutting them up, tearing out their root balls and stuffing them into bags. We burned them instead of throwing them "away" where I'm sure the spores can escape into the locality of wherever our trash goes. It has been depressing watching the disease quickly destroy the remaining plants and move on to the second planting, just a few rows away. We have prepared another couple beds in a separate field for the third planting, but we wonder if all the effort is going to yield any tomatoes. What I am trying to choke out, folks, is that you probably will not be seeing any tomatoes in your share this year. It is one of my favorite crops and it is a huge sigh of glum resignation to see the field brown and dying. I am so sorry that one of the greatest local crops, the one that is really only worth eating when it is picked ripe and recently, is not going to make a showing this summer. I feel like we did our best, but the constant wet leaves this summer have been the perfect host for the fungus that caused the Irish potato famine. This brings up the next point - yes, our potatoes have it also. Interestingly, the blue ones are resisting the best. Anyway, the potatoes grew very fast for us, as you've been seeing from the new potato harvest. That means the potatoes are in there and won't rot unless they are harvested and exposed to active Phytopthora spores from the rest of the infected plant. My impression is that the plants must be completely dead and dry before the harvest for storage potatoes begins. As for the new potatoes, we expect (and recommend) they are being refrigerated and consumed within the week. More on that later. It is probably no concession to you, but I am relieved that our other solanaceous crops, peppers and eggplants, are not affected. They seem to be doing well so far. We are thinking maybe we will have peas take over the tomato trellis. Time will tell. 
We thank you again for being such a positive bunch and join you all in mourning the quintessential summer fruit. Chris, in his ever-positive twist on life, wants us to take heart and find inspiration in all of the vegetables that are coming in abundance during this particular growing season. There truly is strength in diversity and we feel grateful to be empowered by the good faith of all of you to grow such a diverse crop plan. If we had based our plan simply on market value, we may be growing just lettuce and tomatoes. You are our foundation, CSA members. Thanks for sticking with us and finally for you Friday folks, here is the breakdown:

lots of familiar things in today's share, but here are some important notes: 

1. Those little peppers are HOT! The small dark green ones are called Serrano and are quite hot. a very fine dice of half of one is good for a fresh salsa. You can always add more, but it is difficult to remove once added.You could add it to a chilli.  The larger, lime green one is called Hungarian Hot Wax. Most people recognize the name, Banana pepper. I think it's the kind you find pickled in rings, served with calamari or excellent on a sandwich. Try frying it up with onions and serving it with spicy sausage or even a good hot dog on a bun. We've had it chopped fine on salami sandwiches with swiss, diced cucumbers, cilantro, mayo and olive oil.

2. The eggplants have arrived! There was a choice of either little skinny Asian eggplants, "Orient Express,"  and "Orient Charm," fat, round purple,  "Beatrice," zebra striped "Calliope," or little classic Italian eggplants, "Black Beauty" I really wanted to put something new in the box, I am hoping they can be added to your grilling regime.  I would slice them lengthwise and toss with olive oil, salt, and pepper. The Italian eggplants are just right for eggplant parm. If you have enough to roast or steam at once, scoop out the cooked flesh into a food processor, add fresh garlic, lemon juice, and olive oil to create Babaganoush. A quick search I'm sure could yield a good tried and true recipe. This hummus-like dip is super great with carrot and cucumber sticks, as well as pita bread.

3. Carrots. Snack time. good raw. good cooked. I often grate them and add to a salad or sandwich. I make matchsticks and put them in a stir-fry and the other day I put little rounds of many small carrots in a veggie tomato sauce for pasta (also w/ onion, zucchini, summer squash, swiss chard, parsley, and at the end - scallion greens and basil)

4. Lettuce. Three Kinds: Romaine, New Red Fire, and Green Butterhead, "Adriana." Try a Caesar salad with the Romaine. New Red Fire is a good one to do a Greek style salad with the cucumbers, feta, olives, etc. Butterhead (is that Boston? sure!) is always super for sandwiches and could be a wonderful wrapper for an exotic Asian-inspired lettuce wrap or just tuna, chicken, or egg salad.

5. Red Torpedo or Ailsa Craig Onions. These are fresh onions - meaning they are ready early and don't store. So far all of the fresh onions have been delicious on the grill. Sliced once lengthwise. Of course, use them whenever you would normally use an onion in cooking. A fine dice of onion, sprinkled with salt, with the juice of a lime, and with chopped cilantro is a great salsa - especially with fish tacos or a bean and cheese burrito.

5.5 Scallions. We know you've had them every week for a while, but that is it for a spell. We have lots of fresh onions now and our garlic is harvested, trimmed, bundled and curing in the barn. so get the wheels turning . . . 

6. Herb Extravaganza. Two of either Basil, Parsley, Dill, or Cilantro. Basil is best preserved in olive oil. It has been great in a little mayo "aioli" with fresh garlic in the garlic press, good mayo (homemade would have been the real deal) and fresh parsley. An excellent condiment for sandwiches. We made an awesome marinade for grilled chicken the other day: lots of lime juice, some tequila, splash of OJ, diced red onion and cilantro. Our friends add fresh cilantro to jars of store-bought salsa and it really does kick it up a notch. Dill is perfect for cucumbers and a classic with salmon. Parsley is still a wonderful addition to nearly any dish. It is key to a tabouli salad.

7. Cucumbers: of course you can put them on a salad. or try the cucumber salad suggestions from last week. the rice wine vinegar is a great way to keep sliced cukes for a fresh, crunchy snack alongside a sandwich. cucumber sticks are great dipped in hummus, babaganoush, sour cream and dill, salad dressings, cottage cheese, or just plain. it sure was gratifying last year to have a mom have me peel her little girl a fresh cucumber to eat like a popsicle at the farmer's market. We had an amazing creation from Tini, the little restaurant/bar in Providence that has a CSA share at White Barn Farm. The chef, our friend Darius made a very fine dice of peeled and seeded cucumbers and just-cooked new potatoes, tossed in a lemon vinaigrette with capers to accompany a very delicate spicy grilled calamari. We left telling him he needs to be on Iron Chef. Today we got the tip that a cucumber and fruit salsa is a wonderful creation - fine dice of red onion, cukes, mango, and pineapple. (oh dear, I'm sure there was more to it, but that should be enough to get your minds working).


8. Yellow Squash - by now you must have done grilled. that is always recommended but there are other ideas, too. Diced squash is good sauteed with some onions - not too much in the pan at once or it gets soggy. just enough so that the moisture can cook off and it can even brown a little bit. At that point it is wonderful to add some beaten eggs, S&P, cheese, and fresh basil. Squash can be a nice part of a stir fry or a pasta sauce, soup, or chilli. I have got to put in some test kitchen time and figure out a good soup recipe, but certainly last year a volunteer brought me some very nice pureed soup, perhaps with just white onions sweated in butter, squash, broth and a dash of cream.

9. The enormous Zucchini - this is what happens when you leave the plants unattended for two days, rather than one. But, I am giving you all a zucchini bread recipe and telling you not to try to sautee this monster or even grill it. The huge zucchini is really best for bread. The recipe I have calls for 2 cups, so i will often grate the whole thing and then freeze in 2 cup portions (exactly a pint container that stuff comes in at the grocery store) for the winter when I am feeling like baking. Here is the recipe: Preheat oven to 350. Grease 2 bread pans - I do butter and a very light dusing of flour or a sprinkle of poppy seeds.
Mix together the following in one large bowl: 3 eggs, 2 cups grated zucchini, 1 cup oil (I use organic Canola), 1 cup white sugar, 1/2 cup brown sugar, 2 teaspoons vanilla.  
In a separate bowl, combine: 2 cups flour, 1/4 teaspoon baking powder, 2 teaspoons baking soda, 3 teaspoons cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon cloves, 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, 1 teaspoon salt. 
Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients (I suggest not all at once) Stir until combined. Pour into the two bread pans and bake 45 minutes to an hour, until the toothpick comes out of the center clean.
My dad's wife made an excellent version from Molly Katzen's "The Enchanted Broccoli Forest" I heard another twist - do some pineapple along with the zucchini.

10. Potatoes. the latest creations have been: roasted wedges to serve with ketchup. Mashed with butter and parsley - the leftovers baked in the oven with some milk and a sprinkling of parmesan.