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Posted 7/31/2009 10:31pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hey everyone! Thank you for all of your kind support, everybody. It has been fun getting to know everyone throughout the rainy Fridays of 2009. I feel like lots of us discussed the tomato situation this year. There was a good Globe article that explains the scale of the situation. Like most tomato growers in New England this year, our plants have late blight. We have three generations of tomato plants - the last are supposed to be planted next week. They don't have signs of disease but almost certainly will succumb. As organic growers who have chosen not to spray any fungicides (even certified organic copper sprays) at the farm, our only option has been sanitation and disease prevention.  We meticulously grew all of our own starts from seed, monitoring their health, boosting immunity with a spray of fish and seaweed emusion,  planting them out by hand, staking them so their leaves would not be on the soil, pruning the suckers on sunny days (these were rare and we pounced on them in the name of tomato health) to promote good air circulation, staking them as they grew more and more. We laid drip lines in case it ever stops raining, and finally mulched with straw to prevent soil splash from spreading disease. A few weeks ago I noticed the first signs of blight on the oldest leaves - brown lesions. When I saw the white fuzz on the underside of the leaf that distinguishes this fungus, I resigned myself to disposing of all of the affected plants. That meant cutting them up, tearing out their root balls and stuffing them into bags. We burned them instead of throwing them "away" where I'm sure the spores can escape into the locality of wherever our trash goes. It has been depressing watching the disease quickly destroy the remaining plants and move on to the second planting, just a few rows away. We have prepared another couple beds in a separate field for the third planting, but we wonder if all the effort is going to yield any tomatoes. What I am trying to choke out, folks, is that you probably will not be seeing any tomatoes in your share this year. It is one of my favorite crops and it is a huge sigh of glum resignation to see the field brown and dying. I am so sorry that one of the greatest local crops, the one that is really only worth eating when it is picked ripe and recently, is not going to make a showing this summer. I feel like we did our best, but the constant wet leaves this summer have been the perfect host for the fungus that caused the Irish potato famine. This brings up the next point - yes, our potatoes have it also. Interestingly, the blue ones are resisting the best. Anyway, the potatoes grew very fast for us, as you've been seeing from the new potato harvest. That means the potatoes are in there and won't rot unless they are harvested and exposed to active Phytopthora spores from the rest of the infected plant. My impression is that the plants must be completely dead and dry before the harvest for storage potatoes begins. As for the new potatoes, we expect (and recommend) they are being refrigerated and consumed within the week. More on that later. It is probably no concession to you, but I am relieved that our other solanaceous crops, peppers and eggplants, are not affected. They seem to be doing well so far. We are thinking maybe we will have peas take over the tomato trellis. Time will tell. 
We thank you again for being such a positive bunch and join you all in mourning the quintessential summer fruit. Chris, in his ever-positive twist on life, wants us to take heart and find inspiration in all of the vegetables that are coming in abundance during this particular growing season. There truly is strength in diversity and we feel grateful to be empowered by the good faith of all of you to grow such a diverse crop plan. If we had based our plan simply on market value, we may be growing just lettuce and tomatoes. You are our foundation, CSA members. Thanks for sticking with us and finally for you Friday folks, here is the breakdown:

lots of familiar things in today's share, but here are some important notes: 

1. Those little peppers are HOT! The small dark green ones are called Serrano and are quite hot. a very fine dice of half of one is good for a fresh salsa. You can always add more, but it is difficult to remove once added.You could add it to a chilli.  The larger, lime green one is called Hungarian Hot Wax. Most people recognize the name, Banana pepper. I think it's the kind you find pickled in rings, served with calamari or excellent on a sandwich. Try frying it up with onions and serving it with spicy sausage or even a good hot dog on a bun. We've had it chopped fine on salami sandwiches with swiss, diced cucumbers, cilantro, mayo and olive oil.

2. The eggplants have arrived! There was a choice of either little skinny Asian eggplants, "Orient Express,"  and "Orient Charm," fat, round purple,  "Beatrice," zebra striped "Calliope," or little classic Italian eggplants, "Black Beauty" I really wanted to put something new in the box, I am hoping they can be added to your grilling regime.  I would slice them lengthwise and toss with olive oil, salt, and pepper. The Italian eggplants are just right for eggplant parm. If you have enough to roast or steam at once, scoop out the cooked flesh into a food processor, add fresh garlic, lemon juice, and olive oil to create Babaganoush. A quick search I'm sure could yield a good tried and true recipe. This hummus-like dip is super great with carrot and cucumber sticks, as well as pita bread.

3. Carrots. Snack time. good raw. good cooked. I often grate them and add to a salad or sandwich. I make matchsticks and put them in a stir-fry and the other day I put little rounds of many small carrots in a veggie tomato sauce for pasta (also w/ onion, zucchini, summer squash, swiss chard, parsley, and at the end - scallion greens and basil)

4. Lettuce. Three Kinds: Romaine, New Red Fire, and Green Butterhead, "Adriana." Try a Caesar salad with the Romaine. New Red Fire is a good one to do a Greek style salad with the cucumbers, feta, olives, etc. Butterhead (is that Boston? sure!) is always super for sandwiches and could be a wonderful wrapper for an exotic Asian-inspired lettuce wrap or just tuna, chicken, or egg salad.

5. Red Torpedo or Ailsa Craig Onions. These are fresh onions - meaning they are ready early and don't store. So far all of the fresh onions have been delicious on the grill. Sliced once lengthwise. Of course, use them whenever you would normally use an onion in cooking. A fine dice of onion, sprinkled with salt, with the juice of a lime, and with chopped cilantro is a great salsa - especially with fish tacos or a bean and cheese burrito.

5.5 Scallions. We know you've had them every week for a while, but that is it for a spell. We have lots of fresh onions now and our garlic is harvested, trimmed, bundled and curing in the barn. so get the wheels turning . . . 

6. Herb Extravaganza. Two of either Basil, Parsley, Dill, or Cilantro. Basil is best preserved in olive oil. It has been great in a little mayo "aioli" with fresh garlic in the garlic press, good mayo (homemade would have been the real deal) and fresh parsley. An excellent condiment for sandwiches. We made an awesome marinade for grilled chicken the other day: lots of lime juice, some tequila, splash of OJ, diced red onion and cilantro. Our friends add fresh cilantro to jars of store-bought salsa and it really does kick it up a notch. Dill is perfect for cucumbers and a classic with salmon. Parsley is still a wonderful addition to nearly any dish. It is key to a tabouli salad.

7. Cucumbers: of course you can put them on a salad. or try the cucumber salad suggestions from last week. the rice wine vinegar is a great way to keep sliced cukes for a fresh, crunchy snack alongside a sandwich. cucumber sticks are great dipped in hummus, babaganoush, sour cream and dill, salad dressings, cottage cheese, or just plain. it sure was gratifying last year to have a mom have me peel her little girl a fresh cucumber to eat like a popsicle at the farmer's market. We had an amazing creation from Tini, the little restaurant/bar in Providence that has a CSA share at White Barn Farm. The chef, our friend Darius made a very fine dice of peeled and seeded cucumbers and just-cooked new potatoes, tossed in a lemon vinaigrette with capers to accompany a very delicate spicy grilled calamari. We left telling him he needs to be on Iron Chef. Today we got the tip that a cucumber and fruit salsa is a wonderful creation - fine dice of red onion, cukes, mango, and pineapple. (oh dear, I'm sure there was more to it, but that should be enough to get your minds working).


8. Yellow Squash - by now you must have done grilled. that is always recommended but there are other ideas, too. Diced squash is good sauteed with some onions - not too much in the pan at once or it gets soggy. just enough so that the moisture can cook off and it can even brown a little bit. At that point it is wonderful to add some beaten eggs, S&P, cheese, and fresh basil. Squash can be a nice part of a stir fry or a pasta sauce, soup, or chilli. I have got to put in some test kitchen time and figure out a good soup recipe, but certainly last year a volunteer brought me some very nice pureed soup, perhaps with just white onions sweated in butter, squash, broth and a dash of cream.

9. The enormous Zucchini - this is what happens when you leave the plants unattended for two days, rather than one. But, I am giving you all a zucchini bread recipe and telling you not to try to sautee this monster or even grill it. The huge zucchini is really best for bread. The recipe I have calls for 2 cups, so i will often grate the whole thing and then freeze in 2 cup portions (exactly a pint container that stuff comes in at the grocery store) for the winter when I am feeling like baking. Here is the recipe: Preheat oven to 350. Grease 2 bread pans - I do butter and a very light dusing of flour or a sprinkle of poppy seeds.
Mix together the following in one large bowl: 3 eggs, 2 cups grated zucchini, 1 cup oil (I use organic Canola), 1 cup white sugar, 1/2 cup brown sugar, 2 teaspoons vanilla.  
In a separate bowl, combine: 2 cups flour, 1/4 teaspoon baking powder, 2 teaspoons baking soda, 3 teaspoons cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon cloves, 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, 1 teaspoon salt. 
Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients (I suggest not all at once) Stir until combined. Pour into the two bread pans and bake 45 minutes to an hour, until the toothpick comes out of the center clean.
My dad's wife made an excellent version from Molly Katzen's "The Enchanted Broccoli Forest" I heard another twist - do some pineapple along with the zucchini.

10. Potatoes. the latest creations have been: roasted wedges to serve with ketchup. Mashed with butter and parsley - the leftovers baked in the oven with some milk and a sprinkling of parmesan.


Posted 7/29/2009 7:30am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hey everyone! I am going to cheat and borrow some of my tips from Friday's email. I have posted all of the emails on my blog on the website, www.whitebarnfarm.org if you ever want to peek for other ideas. 

There are a few new things to tell you about, though:

1. Those little peppers are HOT! The small dark green ones are called Serrano and are quite hot. a very fine dice of half of one is good for a fresh salsa. You can always add more, but it is difficult to remove once added.  The larger, lime green one is called Hungarian Hot Wax. Most people recognize the name, Banana pepper. I think it's the kind you find pickled in rings, served with calamari or excellent on a sandwich. Try frying it up with onions and serving it with spicy sausage or even a good hot dog on a bun.

2. The first eggplants have arrived! There were just enough for the shares, but they were different varieties - either little skinny Asian eggplants, "Orient Express," fat, round purple,  "Beatrice," or little classic Italian eggplants, "Black Beauty" I really wanted to put something new in the box, I am hoping they can be added to your grilling regime.  I would slice them lengthwise and toss with olive oil, salt, and pepper.

3. Carrots. Snack time. good raw. good cooked. I often grate them and add to a salad or sandwich. I make matchsticks and put them in a stir-fry and the other day I put little rounds of many small carrots in a veggie tomato sauce for pasta (also w/ onion, zucchini, summer squash, swiss chard, parsley, and at the end - scallion greens and basil)

4. Lettuce. Three Kinds: Romaine, New Red Fire, and a new one I think is called Nevada - but I'm not sure so let's just call it "Crispino" It is a very dense head with prickly seeming edges. very tasty. Try a Caesar salad with the Romaine. New Red Fire is a good one to do a Greek style salad with the cucumbers, feta, olives, etc.

5. Ailsa Craig Onions. These are fresh onions - meaning they are ready early and don't store. So far all of the fresh onions have been delicious on the grill. Sliced once lengthwise. Of course, use them whenever you would normally use an onion in cooking. A fine dice of onion, sprinkled with salt, with the juice of a lime, and with chopped cilantro is a great salsa - especially with fish tacos or a bean and cheese burrito.

6. Cilantro. We made an awesome marinade for grilled chicken the other day: lots of lime juice, some tequila, splash of OJ, diced red onion and cilantro. Our friends add fresh cilantro to jars of store-bought salsa and it really does kick it up a notch.

7. Cucumbers: yay! finally lots of cukes. of course you can put them on a salad. they pair especially well with feta and good olives. but this is probably a good week to make a cucumber salad. before i go crazy with that idea here are a few simple things to do: cut them into  sticks and make a sour cream and dill dip - with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice for adjustment. what refreshment. an easy thing to do is to slice up a few cukes, sprinkle with a pinch of salt and a pinch of sugar, then toss with seasoned rice wine vinegar and keep in the fridge. it's like a fresh pickle.  Chris and I have been enjoying veggie sandwiches with diced cucumbers, grated carrots, lettuce, grated cheese, basil,  and pickled hot peppers.  onto the salads. In Austria I loved the gurken salat (sp?). the dressing was a couple fresh cloves of garlic in the garlic press then some magic "topfen" cheese that I think can be substituted with sour cream, maybe a touch of plain yogurt or cottage cheese, salt and fresh herbs.  It was good with the cukes diced or thinly sliced.  
we should look up a recipe for that awesome Greek (?) stuff, Tzatziki? pause. quick wikipedia session:Tzatziki, tzadziki, or tsatsiki (Greekτζατζίκι) is a Greek meze or appetizer, also used as a sauce for souvlaki and gyros. Tzatziki is made of strained yoghurt (usually sheep's-milk or goat's-milk in Greece and Turkey) withcucumbersgarlic, salt, usually olive oilpepperdill, sometimes lemon juiceand parsley, or mint added. The cucumbers are either pureed and strained, or seeded and finely diced. Olive oil, olives, and herbs are often used as garnishes. 

what about that cooling Indian condiment, Raita? raita (also spelled raitha) (Urdu: رایتہ ) or pachadiis a South Asian/Pakistanicondiment based on yogurt (dahi) and used as a sauce or dip. The yogurt is seasoned with coriander (cilantro), cuminmintcayenne pepper, and other herbs and spices. It is prepared by frying caraway (zeera) along with red mustard (raie) and these mixtures are poured into curd. Vegetables such as cucumber and onions and sometimes garlic are mixed in. A popular variety of raitha of northern India is Boondi raitha; tiny balls of fried gramflour, which may taste salty or tikka(spicy). The mixture is served chilled. Raita has a cooling effect on the palate that makes it a good foil for spicy Indian dishes. Raita is also eaten with kababs.ureed and strained, or seeded and finely diced. Olive oil, olives, and herbs are often used as garnishes.

that should be good for now.  oh wait. here is a suggestion from one of our fabulous work-for-shares, Denise: Her daughters love cream cheese and cucumber sandwiches with a touch of fresh chopped dill. 

8. Zucchini and Summer Squash - Grill it all. If you have a grill basket, cut any which way. if not, I suggest slicing everything the long way. I get out a big bowl, wash the veggies, slice em all, and toss in the bowl with salt, pepper, olive oil, and fresh chopped herbs. Italian dressing also works shamefully well. 
I suggest doing all of your grillable veggies at once if you don't have other uses in mind for throughout the week. Grilled veggies are a leftover delight to create other dishes out of: 
Grilled Vegetable Bruschetta, Grilled Vegetable Quesadillas with cheese, scallions, and basil. Grilled veggie sandwich or wrap with buttery lettuce, goat cheese, olive oil and balsamic vinegar. quiche, omelet etc etc

Zucchinis are wonderful sauteed in olive oil with basil, served with buttered pasta with lots of fresh grated parmigiano. or nice in a Frittata. or a risotto. or sliced and sauteed on the stove. 

9. The enormous Zucchini at the bottom of the box - this is what happens when you leave the plants unattended for two days, rather than one. But, I am giving you all a zucchini bread recipe and tell you not to try to sautee this monster or even grill it. The huge zucchini is really best for bread. The recipe I have calls for 2 cups, so i will often grate the whole thing and then freeze in 2 cup portions for the winter when I am feeling like baking. Here is the recipe: Preheat oven to 350. Grease 2 bread pans - I do butter and a very light dusing of flour or a sprinkle of poppy seeds.
Mix together the following in one large bowl: 3 eggs, 2 cups grated zucchini, 1 cup oil (I use organic Canola), 1 cup white sugar, 1/2 cup brown sugar, 2 teaspoons vanilla.  
In a separate bowl, combine: 2 cups flour, 1/4 teaspoon baking powder, 2 teaspoons baking soda, 3 teaspoons cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon cloves, 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, 1 teaspoon salt. 
Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients (I suggest not all at once) Stir until combined. Pour into the two bread pans and bake 45 minutes to an hour, until the toothpick comes out of the center clean.

10. Potatoes. definitely the warm potato salad in any form is great. particularly with crumbled bacon. My cousin's wife made a killer cobb salad with the potatoes. She did boiled potatoes, (finely chopped red onion?), bacon, hardboiled eggs, grilled turkey breast and made a lemon vinaigrette with fresh basil - ousting her husband's 18 year Annie's Goddess dressing addiction for the evening in order to honor her wonderful creation. 
One of our CSA members, and a super massage therapist, has been slicing the potatoes thin, tossing with cayenne, chilli powder, and garlic powder, then broiling on a cookie sheet for a quick, tasty chip.

11. Parsley. my favorite right now is boiled new potatoes, butter, salt, pepper, chopped parsley.

Thank you for all of your kind support, everybody. Do send us an email to let us know what you've been cooking! 
Posted 7/24/2009 10:08pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hi everyone!

this week has brought you lots of

Lettuce: i strongly suggest washing it all at once, spinning it dry, and storing it loosely packed in a plastic bag in the fridge for convenience from here on out.

Cucumbers: yay! finally lots of cukes. of course you can put them on a salad. they pair especially well with feta and good olives. but this is probably a good week to make a cucumber salad. before i go crazy with that idea here are a few simple things to do: cut them into  sticks and make a sour cream and dill dip - with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice for adjustment. what refreshment. an easy thing to do is to slice up a few cukes, sprinkle with a pinch of salt and a pinch of sugar, then toss with seasoned rice wine vinegar and keep in the fridge. it's like a fresh pickle.  Chris and I have been enjoying veggie sandwiches with diced cucumbers, grated carrots, lettuce, grated cheese, basil,  and pickled hot peppers.  onto the salads. In Austria I loved the gurken salat (sp?). the dressing was a couple fresh cloves of garlic in the garlic press then some magic "topfen" cheese that I think can be substituted with sour cream, maybe a touch of plain yogurt or cottage cheese, salt and fresh herbs.  It was good with the cukes diced or thinly sliced.  
we should look up a recipe for that awesome Greek (?) stuff, Tzatziki? pause. quick wikipedia session: Tzatzikitzadziki, or tsatsiki (Greekτζατζίκι) is a Greek meze or appetizer, also used as a sauce for souvlaki and gyros. Tzatziki is made of strained yoghurt (usually sheep's-milk or goat's-milk in Greece and Turkey) withcucumbersgarlic, salt, usually olive oilpepperdill, sometimes lemon juiceand parsley, or mint added. The cucumbers are either pureed and strained, or seeded and finely diced. Olive oil, olives, and herbs are often used as garnishes. 

what about that cooling Indian condiment, Raita? raita (also spelled raitha) (Urdu: رایتہ ) or pachadiis a South Asian/Pakistanicondiment based on yogurt (dahi) and used as a sauce or dip. The yogurt is seasoned with coriander (cilantro), cuminmintcayenne pepper, and other herbs and spices. It is prepared by frying caraway (zeera) along with red mustard (raie) and these mixtures are poured into curd. Vegetables such as cucumber and onions and sometimes garlic are mixed in. A popular variety of raitha of northern India is Boondi raitha; tiny balls of fried gramflour, which may taste salty or tikka(spicy). The mixture is served chilled. Raita has a cooling effect on the palate that makes it a good foil for spicy Indian dishes. Raita is also eaten with kababs.ureed and strained, or seeded and finely diced. Olive oil, olives, and herbs are often used as garnishes.

that should be good for now.  oh wait. here is a suggestion from one of our fabulous work-for-shares, Denise: Her daughters love cream cheese and cucumber sandwiches with a touch of fresh chopped dill. 

Torpedo Onions, Zucchini, and Summer Squash - Grill it all. If you have a grill basket, cut any which way. if not, I suggest slicing everything the long way. I get out a big bowl, wash the veggies, slice em all, and toss in the bowl with salt, pepper, olive oil, and fresh chopped basil. Italian dressing also works shamefully well. The torpedo onions should be trimmed at the bottom, and then at the top where it becomes green (feel free to use the tops in a salad or whatever), then slice once lengthwise - we liked them better sliced than grilled whole.
I suggest doing all of your grillable veggies at once if you don't have other uses in mind for throughout the week. Grilled veggies are a leftover delight to create other dishes out of: 
Grilled Vegetable Bruschetta, Grilled Vegetable Quesadillas with cheese, scallions, and basil. Grilled veggie sandwich or wrap with buttery lettuce, goat cheese, olive oil and balsamic vinegar. omelet etc etc

Zucchinis are wonderful sauteed in olive oil with basil, served with buttered pasta with lots of fresh grated parmigiano. or nice in a Frittata. or a risotto. or sliced and sauteed on the stove. a happy farmstand customer reported that the torpedo onions sauteed with her summer squash was just lovely.

Potatoes. definitely the warm potato salad in any form is great. particularly with crumbled bacon. My cousin's wife made a killer cobb salad with the potatoes. She did boiled potatoes, (finely chopped red onion?), bacon, hardboiled eggs, grilled turkey breast and made a lemon vinaigrette with fresh basil - ousting her husband's 18 year Annie's Goddess dressing addiction for the evening in order to honor her wonderful creation. 
One of our CSA members, and a super massage therapist, has been slicing the potatoes thin, tossing with cayenne, chilli powder, and garlic powder, then broiling on a cookie sheet for a quick, tasty chip.

 Swiss Chard. sautee in olive oil with garlic then use any way you like. or just steam it and serve with a pat of butter and dash of apple cider vinegar. I throw in coarsely chopped raw leaves to a veggie tomato sauce for pasta. I also add lots of chopped scallions and basil as the sauce is tossed with the pasta.

Basil. delicious on any sandwich, in salad dressings, with pasta, eggs, polenta, risotto, on bruschetta, grilled veggies, pureed with olive oil and frozen for later. the leaves can be washed, dried, and be packed into a little jar and covered with good olive oil to preserve the leaves for use all winter. my Italian aunt's sister gave me this tip - my impression was that refrigeration is unnecessary. a nice salad is good lettuce, halved cherry tomatoes, ripped basil leaves, and feta or goat cheese. it would also be nice in an Asian style lettuce wrap.
the key to cooking with basil for me has been to coat it immediately with oil as it goes into the pan. I usually add it at the last minute, and chop it at the last minute so the leaves don't get brown. 
Posted 7/17/2009 5:58pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Summer is Here Everybody!
and we have the yellow squash to prove it. It is hot and sunny and no one can complain! The eggplants are smiling and so are the peppers.

This week in your share:

2 lbs potatoes. yum. sunday breakfast? roasted for dinner. or the all-time favorite. boiled and mashed with a little butter.

2.5 lbs yellow squash. Prolific little buggers.  We love it grilled. Try a simple salt, pepper, olive oil, and fresh herb marinade. maybe add a splash of balsamic vinegar, too. or italian dressing always does the trick. You can slice them lengthwise and work them easily around the grill with a pair of tongs. An excellent recommendation came in from CSA member, Elizabeth Randall. She made a grilled vegetable bruschetta. She grilled her fresh onions, zucchini and summer squash, diced them up and added some fresh chopped parsley, extra virgin olive oil and asiago cheese. (i didn't ask if it was grated, diced, microplaned, melted on the bruschetta, etc). Then she put it on grilled bread. The trick at Al Forno was to start with good slices of excellent bread, grill over hardwood charcoal, then rub the crusty toast with a peeled clove of fresh garlic, effectively using the bread as a grater. Grate that clove down to a nub on all your bread and then add your grilled vegetable topping. Last year one of my volunteers brought me some soup she had made with yellow squash. It is already so buttery tasting, I am imagining it needed little more than onions cooked down in butter, then the diced squash, perhaps some stock, maybe a dash of cream before a puree (those immersion blenders are awesome for avoiding the whole batches in the blender ordeal).

1 large zucchini. I made a risotto the other day with a zucchini of generous proportions. First I diced an onion, got that softened in olive oil, then added diced zucchini, cook until just soft then add arborio rice. Stir until it crackles. Then add enough white wine just to barely cover the rice, let that soak in. Have some chicken stock heating (homemade is best but storebought will do - I threw in my onion peel and zucchini ends to make it more authentic :) Whenever the liquid has absorbed, add a ladle or stock. continue along in the kitchen, wash some lettuce, heat some bread, whatever. just don't forget to check and add more stock every once in a while. when it's all finished taste for salt and pepper, and a nice flourish of fresh grated parmigiano and some fresh chopped herbs is real nice. a pat of butter never hurts. We reheated the leftovers with a jar of tomatoes I had dried last summer and covered with olive oil and has preserved in the fridge until now. 


 Fresh red onions. Purplette or Tropeana Lunga (the red torpedo onions). We have more work to do in the test kitchen to determine if one is sweeter or sharper than the other. I think the torpedo onions would be beautiful roasted or grilled. The other ones would be just as good, though. The rounder purplettes may be easier to handle for dicing and throwing in a salsa, tabouli, or chopped salad. 

Cucumbers. Grammie taught me when I was a kid to eat them by the slice with a shake of salt. They are so nice in a salad. When you are getting "too many" cucumbers I will start giving more creative ideas. Okay,  How about

Carrots. so tasty. ditch those lathed baby carrots sprayed with chlorine and from a large carrot anyway. slice up some sticks and enjoy. or feature them as a side dish. or grate onto a salad.

Three heads of lettuce. This crop did really well and two whole beds seem to be getting ready at once. Hope you have learned that children dig salad spinners (if you have kids, of course. if not - find your playful spirit and spin, pump, or pull the string!)

Swiss Chard. summer spinach substitute. 

Scallions. always good with melted cheese. especially in a quick Quesadilla with some chopped red onion, cilantro and lime juice My uncle Neal made me try a peanut butter scallion sandwich. crazy but good. lengthwise slivered scallions are the crunchy, curly secret flair that finishes Al Forno's grilled pizzas.

Cilantro and Parsley. see previous emails and browse Tuesdays email, which I usually post as a blog entry.


that's all, folks!


 
Posted 7/15/2009 7:03am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hi Everyone!

I hope you have all been soaking in the sunshine. Certainly our plants have been basking. Finally we have cucumbers, zucchini, and summer squash and it is time to turn under the peas. The very first cherry tomatoes have begun to ripen but I have spied some late blight at the end of two of my rows of our first planting of tomatoes. I have been resigning myself to going out and destroying the poor little guys that are laden with green tomatoes.  Phytopthora is the fungus that causes late blight (think Irish potato famine) - it can wipe out whole crops of tomatoes and potatoes: my favorite and chris' favorite crops! That is my biggest concern for now, but all in all we cannot complain about the season so far. Our well-drained soil and awesome flexible farm crew have allowed us to just manage to get things done despite the thunderstorms.

july 14th's box has brought you:

carrots
lettuce
cucumber

sounds like a salad so far

zucchini and summer squash. these are great sliced lengthwise, tossed with a quick marinade - perhaps a balsamic and olive oil, and thrown on the grill. I made a good zucchini risotto for lunch the other day. finished with basil and parmigiano. the larger zucchini was fine for this - just diced kind of small and tossed in with the onions.

salad turnips. always good sliced and sauteed briefly in butter. you could take some of the smaller carrots and roast little turnips, little carrots, and some of your little onions with a roast of some sort. or pretend they are white radishes.

swiss chard. steam and serve with a pat of butter. chard is a summer spinach substitute. It can be nice sauteed with garlic and oil and put on a pizza or stuffed in a calzone or accompanying ricotta raviolis. try it with caramelized onions, golden raisins, and finished with toasted pine nuts and a nice feta or goat cheese - that would be good with a grain - perhaps a rice pilaf or couscous.

new potatoes. heavenly little treats. i like to scrub them and boil whole. when fork tender, drain the water, allow to steam a moment with the lid askew to get rid of any remaining water, then take a fork and knife and kind of haphazardly try to get uniform size chunks in the pot. at this point you can add butter and parsley or dill or chives or maybe some sauteed onions and kale with curry powder or peas and crumbled bacon (bacon is always a tasty addition). taste for salt and pepper. perhaps a little cream or  some mayo and lemon juice would be a nice touch, depending on the style of your warm potato salad style. They are great halved and roasted on a cookie sheet in a 400 degree oven, tossed in oil w/ S&P and herbs if you're inspired.

Purplette Onions. fresh red onions. red onion is delicious chopped fine and sprinkled with salt, chopped cilantro and the juice of a whole lime. the salt and citrus tend to neutralize a little of the raw onion bite and this little combo is a wonderful basis for guacamole - just add a chopped avocado or a mango for salsa. or just put it in a wrap with rice, refried beans, cheese, a dash of hot sauce, sliced buttercrunch lettuce, maybe diced sauteed zucchini. I always keep tortillas on hand for quick lunches of wraps or quesadillas. These onions would also be nice grilled or roasted either whole or halved. I kind of picture then accompanying a grilled or roasted fish.

Cilantro. great with the onion and lime as described above. great with a tuna salad. a nice treatment for fish or shrimp. It seems the best shrimp I've had was marinated with lime juice, cilantro, and tequila (?) then broiled until just tender. look up some asian dishes with cilantro. our bunches include the roots which are sometimes required in authentic dishes.

Scallions. My uncle Neal made me try a peanut butter and scallion sandwich. It was strangely good. something Thai about it maybe. but some more likely combinations usually are with cheese or eggs. scallion bottoms sauteed with a little butter, then scrambled with good eggs, finished with some cheese and scallion tops is just terrific on toast. scally's are great with in cheese quesadillas or in that magic 7-layer bean dip my aunt serves.

Thanks for being our loyal supporters and being patient with me on these emails! It is hard to muster inspiration after the very long harvest/market days. I'm off to the fields to dispose of infected tomatoes :( and then plant our next round of zukes and cukes and melons :)


 
Posted 7/8/2009 4:40pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Howdy folks!
Better Late than Never. It's just another thunderstorm at White Barn Farm. We spent all morning prepping beds to be planted and the weather was very cooperative even during a visit from the crew at Rabbit's Dance Farm in Cumberland.  They wanted to see how our Waterwheel Transplanter worked and have a ride on the giant gadget. We did manage to plant one bed of lettuce, and now the skies have opened up and it is time to email you all about what is in your share this week:

Zucchini. the very first ones! When they are still fresh, novel, and valued! Everyone knows that during the peak of the harvest season in Lake Wobegon, at least, car doors and screen porches must be locked or you will for sure end up with a grocery bag full of zuchhini placed inside. i don't really grow tired of zucchini, folks. It is versatile and can be featured on its own or included in lots of other dishes.  It is great to throw on the grill - a quick marination in olive oil with salt, pepper and fresh herbs is good. They can be sliced lengthwise and grilled in strips, cubed for a skewer, or sliced for a grill basket. Today I sliced some fresh pearl onions, diced some zucchini, and sauteed pretty hot with a little olive oil, salt, and pepper to get a little browning and no sogginess.  I put that on top of little tortillas, heated in the toaster oven with some slices of Cabot cheddar and scallions. I finished the little creation with chopped cilantro and hot sauce. I did a second round as we ate the first round.
An excellent simple pasta I learned from Marino at L'Aperegina in Corvara, Italy was Spaghetti with zucchini and basil.  Start hardboiling a couple of eggs - or if you like egg salad sandwiches make those the day before and set aside two yolks for this recipe.  Start boiling the pasta water with a good palmful of kosher salt. The zucchini is sliced very thin, at a bias if it is small. Sautee in olive oil until tender. Meanwhile, pluck the basil leaves off the stems, slice a few times and throw in the oil as the zucchini finishes cooking, making sure it is tossed in the oil immediately so it crisps a little bit and doesn't turn brown. Put two yolks of the hardboiled eggs in a little bowl and fork mash into a couple tablespoons of butter at room temperature - this is the secret thickening trick for the "sauce" and it is still good without it if you don't feel like hardboiling eggs.  Cook the spaghetti - read the cooking time on the box and set a timer - don't overcook! strain and throw together with the zucchini and basil, then mix in the egg and butter paste. Finish with plenty of fresh grated parmigiano.

Basil.  We bagged handfuls of basil during a downpour so it should probably be taken out of its bag, washed and spun dry and kept in a plastic bag in the fridge. Basil is an excellent flavor to add to all sorts of things. Chris likes when I add it to a sandwich. It is always nice with a red tomato sauce.


New Potatoes. I adore these little jewels. They are Dark Red Norland potatoes. This is a quick little peek into our potato crop which looks beautiful so far.  The plants have not matured all of their tubers yet so I kind of felt like a robber digging into the earth for these little beauties. We got inspired to dig up red, white, and blue potatoes for the 4th of July Roadside Stand.  They are excellent boiled and mashed with a fork and some butter salt and pepper. some chopped parsley is a great addition. Check out one of my latest blog entries (about the stand being open the 4th) to find a good recipe for warm potato salad with sugarsnap peas - all the ingredients are in your share except optional crisped bacon, a squeeze of lemon, mayo, S&P.

Tuscan Kale. Just a small bunch. This variety cooks down very tender and bright green in olive oil with slices of garlic.  Sautee it and freeze it if you are tired of kale.  I added some cooked kale to a pasta with fresh onions, anchovies (I used the other half of the tin to make Caesar dressing for the Romaine), lemon peel, and tomato puree from last season.  I used Penne pasta and pecorino romano cheese.

Parsley. I made sure to include at least a little bunch in case you wanted it for the potatoes.

Scallions. Excellent with melted cheese on a tortilla. Add to an egg scramble.

Pearl Drop Onions. I have more experimenting to do with this type of onion, but I have been using them whenever I would use regular onions.  I think they would be really sweet on the grill. or halved and roasted in the oven. they could be in a nice medley of roasted vegetables.

Bunch of Spicy Arugula. Cut above the roots, wash, spin dry and get ready to eat.  It is a nice salad green to have with a simple lemon juice, sea salt and olive oil dressing as an accompaniment for a plate of sliced salami, sliced mozzarella, some good olives, and good bread. Chop it fine and use it like an herb in a pasta salad (or rice, bulgur, couscous, etc). Bacon, arugula, mayo is a good stand-in for BLTs for now.

Head Lettuce. Romaine - good for Caesar salads. make your own croutons for a really classy touch.  Red Cross is the red butterhead - very tender. nice leaves for sandwiches or salads.  and Hyper Red Rumple-Waved, the loony name of Chris' choice from the seed catalog. A very nice red leaf, Chris.  

Beets. Keep roasting. A grated beet salad is good too. I'm thinking grated carrots, beets, ginger, with a little lemon and apple juice. Eat the tops if you are craving greens.

Sugarsnap Peas. Try them in the potato salad. or just eat 'em. They are a really nice side, just sauteed in butter.

Thank you for hanging in there with all of your cooking powers! I hope you are all finding new healthy, tasty habits forming.


 
Posted 7/3/2009 6:42pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hello Everyone!
I am back! I apologize for leaving you all in the fog that has infiltrated every nook and cranny for the past few weeks. I am typing on my MacBook here at the stand like only a modern young farmer would. What must passers-by on 1A be thinking?? The pigtail girl always crossing the road with a wagon, a 5-gallon bucket or a tractor - now she is on the computer! I need to send a huge thank you to the kind folks at AXIOM Computer Repair Service in the center of Wrentham (www.axiomcrs.com) for doing a fast and friendly job getting my computer all fixed up after an unfortunate spill. Let's hope the "Everything is Broken" phase of the summer can come to a conclusion - my phone died so I had to buy a new cell phone (there is still time to return that overpriced piece of junk it if anyone has an old working phone and wants to donate it to us!) I also had to get a new clutch for my Subaru this week. Huge thank you to Joe at Auto Clinic in Norfolk down near the Horse'N'Carriage for doing an incredibly speedy repair! Now I can get to the point:

What is in your fridge??????

1. three heads of lettuce.  I suggest the usual wash and spin dry, store in a plastic bag. make salads at will. Put it on a burger. or any kind of sandwich. Some nice salads before you have super fresh wonderful cukes and tomatoes: grated carrots, toasted walnuts, blue cheese, and dried cranberries.  grated beets and carrots. roasted beets and feta or goat cheese. halved grapes, thinly sliced green apple in lemon juice, goat cheese. fresh chopped parsley and scallion greens can dress  up any salad. try thinly sliced radishes or salad turnips. give the homemade salad dressings a whirl - taste with a shred of lettuce and adjust until it is fantastic (rule of thumb: 1 vinegar:3 oil)

2. bunch of parsley. my most treasured herb. wonderful for adding to egg scrambles, sneaking into turkey sandwiches, using as part of a compound butter for stuffing under the skin of a roast chicken, chopping and adding to polenta as it finishes cooking.  I made a great warm potato salad finished with parsley, lemon, and scallion greens. Chopped along with rosemary and sage and thrown into Panko Japanese bread crumbs it makes a wonderful breading for a roasted pork tenderloin (the other tricks are to salt and pepper first, massage with grey poupon, roll in herbed crumbsThere is a classic fresh herb rub, gremolata, which is finely chopped garlic, lemon peel, and parsley. Do some research to find its most appropriate use, but I know Al Forno in Providence would finish braised meats with this delightful fresh herb zing.  Alice Waters, a hero of mine since college, has an excellent cookbook named The Art of Simple Food (?). She has a nice recipe for salsa verde which is great for fish, especially, but also very nice on boiled potatoes. I need to look it up but I think there are anchovies, lemon zest and juice, garlic, salt, and parsley - all pounded into a nice paste with a mortar and pestle.

3. bunch of baby carrots. What can I say? I was desperate to give you folks some diversity in the share. The rain has been keeping all of the cool weather crops healthy and luscious but slowing the ripening of more summery crops. the reports are trickling in that some husbands are claiming they are turning green. Take heart, the first zucchini are also trickling in and we will dig some new potatoes for the Fourth of July Roadside Stand tomorrow, so you will be seeing those sort of things in your share by next week. As for the carrots, they are great scrubbed and eaten raw - I don't think a well scrubbed carrot really needs to be peeled. A cute side dish may be your baby turnips and baby carrots thrown on a baking sheet with a drizzle of olive oil and some salt and pepper. Roast em up and serve them as a side. grated carrots and turnips would make a nice salad with the mizuna in your share this week (the feathery looking mustard green in a bag).

4. Two bunches of scallions.  A lovely Sunday breakfast is a scallion and herb frittata. I sautee the scallion whites first - maybe even add a little thinly chopped kale or chard to wilt down and crack some eggs in the meantime. I don't add milk - I find that always makes it too watery, but I do whip it with a fork - trying to incorporate as much air as possible (I suppose a whisk would do a better job). I get some sort of cheese on deck - crumbled feta or goat cheese or grated cheddar or parmigiano or even spoonfuls of sour cream. and then chop some herbs. Parlsley, basil, rosemary, sage, thyme, scallion greens, or any combination.  If I added the chard I drain the liquid, turn down the heat, then add the eggs, followed by salt and pepper, the cheese and the herbs. I use a heat resistant rubber spatula on my trusty nonstick pan to mix it all together and then allow it to set. If it is thin enough it will set easily. A thicker one usually needs to be finished in the oven (a proper oven-safe pan is required for this step). Or you can ditch the frittata idea at the last minute, proclaim it an egg scramble and serve with good toast.  Scallions are great for stir fries - the white parts can be your onions at the start and the greens can be stirred in at the last minute.  Scallions are excellent with burritos, quesadillas, tacos, etc.  Our work-for-share, Meg, suggests scallion foccacia.

5. bunch of baby salad turnips. These are the first harvest of the third planting of little turnips. The good ones were few and far between, my cue to stop seeding these little friends until fall.  But they are little and tender and perhaps best treated like white radishes. The greens are still great, sauteed with garlic and olive oil. Or try my cutie baby turnip an carrot idea from above. If you are inspired to scrub and slice them into rounds, they are still excellent sauteed in butter just until soft, finished with salt and pepper.

6. Bunch of chard or kale. cook w/ garlic and olive oil. the chard is fine steamed - more like spinach. make sure to strip the greens as the plants are maturing and the stems are getting tougher. Chopped finely they can be added to the pan first to cook through. Chris made wonderful curried kale and potatoes the other day - he chopped and boiled the potatoes then added them to his sautee pan that had already carmelized garlic and onions, seasoned with curry powder and a dash of cayenne, then added some leftover cooked kale we had done during some other cooking frenzy just to downsize the incredible fridge, bursting with giant vegetables.  I heard one of our members say she was going home to make swiss chard calzones. A nice pasta could be crumbled Italian sausage with garlic, kale, and crushed red pepper. dollops of good ricotta (like from Narragansett Creamery) would be an extra nice touch.

7. Bag of Mizuna.  Salad green, mentioned above. wash and spin and throw in a salad bowl. Check out my mizuna, radishes, and white balsamic vinaigrette recipe on the website, www.whitebarnfarm.org

8. Peas. Snap or Snow. The snow peas are wonderful in a stir fry or just cooked on their own, especially with garlic. The snap peas are divine cooked in butter.  They are a good raw snack, or nice sliced up and thrown in a salad.  Here is the potato salad recipe: boil new potatoes in salted water. Meanwhile, snap and unzip the sugarsnap peas and slice them in half. Put them in a colander strainer of some sort (preferably all metal and with a handle). Chop up some scallion greens and parsley and juice a lemon. get out some mayo and some leftover cooked bacon if you have some from breakfast. when the taters are fork tender, fork them into your serving bowl, use a fork and knife to cut them into quarters or whatever size you like. Now you can blanch your prepped peas - submerge them in the boiling potato water until bright green. lift them out and throw them into the potato bowl, add the parsley, scallions, bacon bits, salt and pepper. add a few good dollops of mayo. i'm sorry purists - I prefer Hellman's, but homemade is always top notch.  mix it up, add the lemon juice. taste for salt and pepper and serve right away. yummy warm potato salad.

9. Napa Cabbage. If they are adding up in your fridge, shove the new ones to the back. they keep quite well. I have been finding lots of great uses for this sweet spring cabbage.  Slice it thin and have it raw in a salad - it gives a nice crunch kind of like iceberg.  Add a little salt to it, the juice of a lime and some chopped cilantro and you have a great component to a fish taco, or refried bean and cheese taco.  It makes a wonderful cole slaw for your 4th of July BBQ. It's nice in a stir fry or added to a miso soup. My favorite use this week was in Buffalo Chicken Wraps and then the leftover Quesadilla version.  We had some Nature's Promise chicken tenders - likely only one stage (ethically) better than just going to the Eagle Brook for wings. Anyway. we put a good amount of butter and Frank's Red Hot sauce in a sauce pan, got it melted together and dipped the strips in that, then flour seasoned w/ just S&P, then fried them in olive oil. they weren't quite cooked through so back into the sauce pan all the strips went to stew in Buffalo sauce for a few minutes. Chris did that while I sliced some Napa thinly, salted it, added a squeeze of lemon, chopped parlsley and some crumbled blue cheese. We had some big tortillas warmed and pliable, stuffed them with the chicken and cabbage and voila! That homemade version saved us the moral debacle of loving buffalo chicken wings but knowing better. and nothing could have held up better than Napa for good crunch and sweet flavor to balance the spice.

That is all I can remember, everyone. Thank you for all giving me a break for my lack of emailing last week, uncomplained about, if not unnoticed.

We are holding our Roadside Stand tomorrow, the Fourth of July, in case anyone was wondering.

Thank you for your continuing and may sunny skies brighten our upcoming days!


 
Posted 6/20/2009 6:39am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Howdy everyone!
We hope you are all enjoying the odyssey through seasonal produce. I have been hearing that children have been eating their vegetables, and that warms my heart.  

Here is what this week's share included:
 
1. Napa Cabbage. This is a really  tender, sweet cabbage that doesn't need to be cooked for long, if at all.  I would add it to a stir-fry at the last minute or just salt some thinly sliced cabbage, then add a little citrus.  Chris thinks it could add texture to a salad - indeed we were served a simple salad of Arugula and sliced Napa with some shredded carrots and Newman's olive oil and vinegar dressing - superb. One friend added it to her roll-up sandwich for some good crunch. 

2. Kohlrabi. Green this time. very nice roasted. we did a side by side test with kohlrabi and the salad turnips. The kohlrabi stayed very firm with oven roasting. the turnips are much better cooked quickly on the stovetop in butter. Peel it, then roast it or just cut it into raw veggie sticks.  One member made a grated salad with kohlrabi, beets, and (i believe she said carrots). the dressing was the juice and zest of one lemon, and I can't remember exactly the other ingredients. surely some salt, olive oil, a touch of mayo. she did say dill. Patty - if you feel like sharing - the grated salad is a really good one to have in your repetoire.

3. Arugula. the spicy little mustard green in the bag.  This batch is tender enough to wash, spin, and add to any salad. I think it is very nice with lemon juice, sea salt, and olive oil. chopped and thrown in a mayo or eggs or wilted onto a fresh pizza or into a risotto or with a pasta. In Italy, my favorite train station snack was a piadina, which to me is a quesadilla - but a good combo was mozzarella, arugula, prosciutto.

4. Butterhead Lettuce. One head of silky lime-green leaves. great for lettuce wraps. excellent on burgers or sandwiches and in a salad, of course. Some excellent salads to fall back on are: sliced red grapes, green apples, and goat cheese. dried cranberries, toasted walnuts, and blue cheese.

5. Mizuna. a bunch of kind of feathery looking mustard greens.  I would cut the whole bunch above the band and wash and spin the bunch. I find a creamy dressing balances the flavor best. Check out the recipe I posted for white balsamic vinaigrette.

6. Cherry Belle Radishes. these are tender enough to have raw, especially thinly sliced. try some good buttered bread, topped with thinly sliced radishes and finsihed w/ a pinch of sea salt. or they are good with mizuna.

7. Bright Lights Swiss Chard. a slight change-up in the cooking greens department, chard instead of kale this week. my favorite way to eat chard is to steam it and add a pat of butter while it's still hot, then a few drops of apple cider vinegar. It is also excellent sauteed with olive oil and garlic.  A nice touch for a side dish is to add pine nuts, golden raisins, and just a touch of balsamic vinegar.  A pasta i used to have at the farm I worked at in Oregon was: Carmelized Onions, Wilted Chard, Toasted Walnuts, and Feta.  Slice the leaves thin and add it to an omelette, like spinach.  One note: When cooking you may want to either cut off the stems, chop and add them to start cooking early, or discard them (especially later in the season), or add them to your stock pot.

8. One Pound of Sugarsnap or Snow Peas. Get Snappin'! Although tasty raw, these peas are even better sauteed in a little butter until they are bright green and a little tender. a pinch of sea salt or a dash of soy sauce and voila!
I don't mind sitting for a few minutes snapping the tops and unzipping the string. Sometimes it is nice to sit.

9. A dozen or so Garlic Scapes: same as last week. use 'em whenever you would have  used garlic. I have recently heard of pickling them. One member used them to add a flourish to rice pilaf - just threw them in with the rice, seasoning, and a drizzle of olive oil.

10. Beets. Glorious beets. These are the ones we intended to grow for a good beet root. Last week's batch we planted in clumps hoping to have early bunches of beet greens. I adore beets and they could be the only vegetable I find acceptable to boil, besides potatoes.  You can scrub 'em, boil til fork tender, drain the water, allow to steam with the cover on for a few minutes, then peel (w/ fork and knife if still too hot to handle). serve w/ a pat of butter.  A very nice alternative, when you have more time, or while you are making a different meal is to roast them.  Scrub the skins, don't peel, put in a foil packet on a baking sheet with a drizzle of oil and pinch of salt, wrap the packet up tight and throw in the oven at 400 until done (an hour or so). allow to cool then pop off the skins  - you may want a knife to slice off the top.  diced or sliced, these roasted beets are excellent hot or cold. and especially in salads.  a chopped salad of shallot or finely diced red onion, diced roasted beets, and gorgonzola is super with a balsamic vinaigrette.  goat cheese is another super complement to roasted beets - try it on a salad of arugula.  Al Forno makes a sliced beet and avocado salad, finished with arugula dressed with lemon juice and olive oil.  For a fast side, I sometimes slice the beets raw then steam them - the thinner the slice the faster they steam.  They do take a little while so don't burn the water all out of the pot! Don't forget the tops are delicious. same as swiss chard.

11. Parsley. one of my favorites. strip the leaves off the stem and finely chop. Add to everything. sandwiches, pastas, risotto, eggs, creamy polenta, herb dressings, herb mayo, herb frittata, egg scramble. Alice Waters has a nice recipe for gremolata, which is parsley, lemon zest, and garlic - a wonderful mash for putting on fish or roasted meats.

12. Cilantro. a nice way to make guacamole is to finely dice a red onion, add a pinch of salt, mash w/ a fork (kind of tenderizing the onion) add the juice of a lime or two, mash again. chop the cilantro, throw that in. Cut up several perfectly ripe avocados - if they aren't ripe at the store sometimes you have to watch them for a few days on your counter. I halve them around the pit, make a grid out of the flesh with a sharp knife, then use a large spoon to scoop it all out into your onion, lime, cilantro mix. serve w/ tortilla chips.
We added it (last) to our stir fry of bok choy, carrots, snow peas, garlic, ginger, Napa Cabbage. we made sure not to drench the stiry fry in soy sauce - just enough for a good amount of moisture, then served soy sauce at the table.


 Thank you all for trekking out into the rain for the third week in a row! We have been feeling proud of how the vegetables look and taste and we are delighted to send them to all of your homes each week!
 
Posted 6/17/2009 6:57am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hello Everyone!

It's happened again.  We scanned and foraged in the fields to put together an array of fresh produce for you.

Here is what was in your share this week:

1. 2 Heads of Napa Cabbage. This is a really  tender, sweet cabbage that doesn't need to be cooked for long, if at all.  I would add it to a stir-fry at the last minute or just salt some thinly sliced cabbage, then add a little citrus.  Chris thinks it could add texture to a salad. One work for share add it to her roll-up sandwich for some good crunch.

2. Kohlrabi. Green this time. very nice roasted. we did a side by side test with kohlrabi and the salad turnips. The kohlrabi stayed very firm with oven roasting. the turnips are much better cooked quickly on the stovetop in butter.

3. Arugula. the spicy little mustard green in the bag.  This batch is tender enough to wash, spin, and add to any salad. I think it is very nice with lemon juice, sea salt, and olive oil. chopped and thrown in a mayo or eggs or wilted onto a fresh pizza or into a risotto or with a pasta.

4. Butterhead Lettuce. One head of silky lime-green leaves. great for lettuce wraps. excellent on burgers or sandwiches and in a salad, of course.

5. Mizuna. a bunch of kind of feathery looking mustard greens.  I would cut the whole bunch above the band and wash and spin the rest. I find a creamy dressing balances the flavor best. Check out the recipe I posted for white balsamic vinaigrette.

6. French Breakfast Radishes. long red radishes with white tips. these are tender enough to have raw, especially thinly sliced. Try slicing at an angle to get bigger pieces.  try some good buttered bread, topped with thinly sliced radishes and finsihed w/ a pinch of sea salt.

7. Bright Lights Swiss Chard. a slight change-up in the cooking greens department, chard instead of kale this week. my favorite way to eat chard is to steam it and add a pat of butter while it's still hot, then a few drops of apple cider vinegar. It is also excellent sauteed with olive oil and garlic.  A nice touch for a side dish is to add pine nuts, golden raisins, and just a touch of balsamic vinegar.  A pasta i used to have at the farm I worked at in Oregon was: Carmelized Onions, Wilted Chard, Toasted Walnuts, and Feta.  Slice the leaves thin and add it to an omelette, like spinach.  One note: When cooking you may want to either cut off the stems, chop and add them to start cooking early, or discard them (especially later in the season), or add them to your stock pot.

8. One Pound of Sugarsnap Peas. Get Snappin'! Although tasty raw, these peas are even better sauteed in a little butter until they are bright green and a little tender. a pinch of sea salt or a dash of soy sauce and voila!
I don't mind sitting for five minutes snapping the tops and unzipping the string. Sometimes it is nice to sit.
Enjoy this larger batch, snow peas are coming on next.

9. A dozen or so Garlic Scapes: same as last week. use 'em whenever you would have  used garlic. I have recently heard of pickling them.

10. Beets. Glorious beets. These are the ones we intended to grow for a good beet root. Last week's batch we planted in clumps hoping to have early bunches of beet greens. I adore beets and they could be the only vegetable I find acceptable to boil, besides potatoes.  You can scrub 'em, boil til fork tender, drain the water, allow to steam with the cover on for a few minutes, then peel (w/ fork and knife if still too hot to handle). serve w/ a pat of butter.  A very nice alternative, when you have more time, or while you are making a different meal is to roast them.  Scrub the skins, don't peel, put in a foil packet on a baking sheet with a drizzle of oil and pinch of salt, wrap the packet up tight and throw in the oven at 400 until done (an hour or so). allow to cool then pop off the skins  - you may want a knife to slice off the top.  diced or sliced, these roasted beets are excellent hot or cold. and especially in salads.  a chopped salad of shallot or finely diced red onion, diced roasted beets, and gorgonzola is super with a balsamic vinaigrette.  goat cheese is another super complement to roasted beets - try it on a salad of arugula.  Al Forno makes a sliced beet and avocado salad, finished with arugula dressed with lemon juice and olive oil.  For a fast side, I sometimes slice the beets raw then steam them - the thinner the slice the faster they steam.  They do take a little while so don't burn the water all out of the pot! Don't forget the tops are delicious. same as swiss chard.


Hope I'm not forgetting anything. I love to hear the feedback on what you have done with your share! I did start the recipe blog, so just find a vegetable you want to comment on, and comment back with a recipe! Everyone will be glad you did :)
 
Posted 6/10/2009 10:08am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

http://whitebarnfarmrecipeblog.wordpress.com

I want all of you to participate and share and learn on our own White Barn Farm Recipe Blog.

We can title the posts with the name of the featured vegetable and then comment back with more ideas, feedback, and other recipes for that vegetable.

bonus points for the simpler, faster, more realistic (yet fantastic) recipes for today's go-go-go land.