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Posted 7/3/2009 6:42pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hello Everyone!
I am back! I apologize for leaving you all in the fog that has infiltrated every nook and cranny for the past few weeks. I am typing on my MacBook here at the stand like only a modern young farmer would. What must passers-by on 1A be thinking?? The pigtail girl always crossing the road with a wagon, a 5-gallon bucket or a tractor - now she is on the computer! I need to send a huge thank you to the kind folks at AXIOM Computer Repair Service in the center of Wrentham (www.axiomcrs.com) for doing a fast and friendly job getting my computer all fixed up after an unfortunate spill. Let's hope the "Everything is Broken" phase of the summer can come to a conclusion - my phone died so I had to buy a new cell phone (there is still time to return that overpriced piece of junk it if anyone has an old working phone and wants to donate it to us!) I also had to get a new clutch for my Subaru this week. Huge thank you to Joe at Auto Clinic in Norfolk down near the Horse'N'Carriage for doing an incredibly speedy repair! Now I can get to the point:

What is in your fridge??????

1. three heads of lettuce.  I suggest the usual wash and spin dry, store in a plastic bag. make salads at will. Put it on a burger. or any kind of sandwich. Some nice salads before you have super fresh wonderful cukes and tomatoes: grated carrots, toasted walnuts, blue cheese, and dried cranberries.  grated beets and carrots. roasted beets and feta or goat cheese. halved grapes, thinly sliced green apple in lemon juice, goat cheese. fresh chopped parsley and scallion greens can dress  up any salad. try thinly sliced radishes or salad turnips. give the homemade salad dressings a whirl - taste with a shred of lettuce and adjust until it is fantastic (rule of thumb: 1 vinegar:3 oil)

2. bunch of parsley. my most treasured herb. wonderful for adding to egg scrambles, sneaking into turkey sandwiches, using as part of a compound butter for stuffing under the skin of a roast chicken, chopping and adding to polenta as it finishes cooking.  I made a great warm potato salad finished with parsley, lemon, and scallion greens. Chopped along with rosemary and sage and thrown into Panko Japanese bread crumbs it makes a wonderful breading for a roasted pork tenderloin (the other tricks are to salt and pepper first, massage with grey poupon, roll in herbed crumbsThere is a classic fresh herb rub, gremolata, which is finely chopped garlic, lemon peel, and parsley. Do some research to find its most appropriate use, but I know Al Forno in Providence would finish braised meats with this delightful fresh herb zing.  Alice Waters, a hero of mine since college, has an excellent cookbook named The Art of Simple Food (?). She has a nice recipe for salsa verde which is great for fish, especially, but also very nice on boiled potatoes. I need to look it up but I think there are anchovies, lemon zest and juice, garlic, salt, and parsley - all pounded into a nice paste with a mortar and pestle.

3. bunch of baby carrots. What can I say? I was desperate to give you folks some diversity in the share. The rain has been keeping all of the cool weather crops healthy and luscious but slowing the ripening of more summery crops. the reports are trickling in that some husbands are claiming they are turning green. Take heart, the first zucchini are also trickling in and we will dig some new potatoes for the Fourth of July Roadside Stand tomorrow, so you will be seeing those sort of things in your share by next week. As for the carrots, they are great scrubbed and eaten raw - I don't think a well scrubbed carrot really needs to be peeled. A cute side dish may be your baby turnips and baby carrots thrown on a baking sheet with a drizzle of olive oil and some salt and pepper. Roast em up and serve them as a side. grated carrots and turnips would make a nice salad with the mizuna in your share this week (the feathery looking mustard green in a bag).

4. Two bunches of scallions.  A lovely Sunday breakfast is a scallion and herb frittata. I sautee the scallion whites first - maybe even add a little thinly chopped kale or chard to wilt down and crack some eggs in the meantime. I don't add milk - I find that always makes it too watery, but I do whip it with a fork - trying to incorporate as much air as possible (I suppose a whisk would do a better job). I get some sort of cheese on deck - crumbled feta or goat cheese or grated cheddar or parmigiano or even spoonfuls of sour cream. and then chop some herbs. Parlsley, basil, rosemary, sage, thyme, scallion greens, or any combination.  If I added the chard I drain the liquid, turn down the heat, then add the eggs, followed by salt and pepper, the cheese and the herbs. I use a heat resistant rubber spatula on my trusty nonstick pan to mix it all together and then allow it to set. If it is thin enough it will set easily. A thicker one usually needs to be finished in the oven (a proper oven-safe pan is required for this step). Or you can ditch the frittata idea at the last minute, proclaim it an egg scramble and serve with good toast.  Scallions are great for stir fries - the white parts can be your onions at the start and the greens can be stirred in at the last minute.  Scallions are excellent with burritos, quesadillas, tacos, etc.  Our work-for-share, Meg, suggests scallion foccacia.

5. bunch of baby salad turnips. These are the first harvest of the third planting of little turnips. The good ones were few and far between, my cue to stop seeding these little friends until fall.  But they are little and tender and perhaps best treated like white radishes. The greens are still great, sauteed with garlic and olive oil. Or try my cutie baby turnip an carrot idea from above. If you are inspired to scrub and slice them into rounds, they are still excellent sauteed in butter just until soft, finished with salt and pepper.

6. Bunch of chard or kale. cook w/ garlic and olive oil. the chard is fine steamed - more like spinach. make sure to strip the greens as the plants are maturing and the stems are getting tougher. Chopped finely they can be added to the pan first to cook through. Chris made wonderful curried kale and potatoes the other day - he chopped and boiled the potatoes then added them to his sautee pan that had already carmelized garlic and onions, seasoned with curry powder and a dash of cayenne, then added some leftover cooked kale we had done during some other cooking frenzy just to downsize the incredible fridge, bursting with giant vegetables.  I heard one of our members say she was going home to make swiss chard calzones. A nice pasta could be crumbled Italian sausage with garlic, kale, and crushed red pepper. dollops of good ricotta (like from Narragansett Creamery) would be an extra nice touch.

7. Bag of Mizuna.  Salad green, mentioned above. wash and spin and throw in a salad bowl. Check out my mizuna, radishes, and white balsamic vinaigrette recipe on the website, www.whitebarnfarm.org

8. Peas. Snap or Snow. The snow peas are wonderful in a stir fry or just cooked on their own, especially with garlic. The snap peas are divine cooked in butter.  They are a good raw snack, or nice sliced up and thrown in a salad.  Here is the potato salad recipe: boil new potatoes in salted water. Meanwhile, snap and unzip the sugarsnap peas and slice them in half. Put them in a colander strainer of some sort (preferably all metal and with a handle). Chop up some scallion greens and parsley and juice a lemon. get out some mayo and some leftover cooked bacon if you have some from breakfast. when the taters are fork tender, fork them into your serving bowl, use a fork and knife to cut them into quarters or whatever size you like. Now you can blanch your prepped peas - submerge them in the boiling potato water until bright green. lift them out and throw them into the potato bowl, add the parsley, scallions, bacon bits, salt and pepper. add a few good dollops of mayo. i'm sorry purists - I prefer Hellman's, but homemade is always top notch.  mix it up, add the lemon juice. taste for salt and pepper and serve right away. yummy warm potato salad.

9. Napa Cabbage. If they are adding up in your fridge, shove the new ones to the back. they keep quite well. I have been finding lots of great uses for this sweet spring cabbage.  Slice it thin and have it raw in a salad - it gives a nice crunch kind of like iceberg.  Add a little salt to it, the juice of a lime and some chopped cilantro and you have a great component to a fish taco, or refried bean and cheese taco.  It makes a wonderful cole slaw for your 4th of July BBQ. It's nice in a stir fry or added to a miso soup. My favorite use this week was in Buffalo Chicken Wraps and then the leftover Quesadilla version.  We had some Nature's Promise chicken tenders - likely only one stage (ethically) better than just going to the Eagle Brook for wings. Anyway. we put a good amount of butter and Frank's Red Hot sauce in a sauce pan, got it melted together and dipped the strips in that, then flour seasoned w/ just S&P, then fried them in olive oil. they weren't quite cooked through so back into the sauce pan all the strips went to stew in Buffalo sauce for a few minutes. Chris did that while I sliced some Napa thinly, salted it, added a squeeze of lemon, chopped parlsley and some crumbled blue cheese. We had some big tortillas warmed and pliable, stuffed them with the chicken and cabbage and voila! That homemade version saved us the moral debacle of loving buffalo chicken wings but knowing better. and nothing could have held up better than Napa for good crunch and sweet flavor to balance the spice.

That is all I can remember, everyone. Thank you for all giving me a break for my lack of emailing last week, uncomplained about, if not unnoticed.

We are holding our Roadside Stand tomorrow, the Fourth of July, in case anyone was wondering.

Thank you for your continuing and may sunny skies brighten our upcoming days!


 
Posted 6/20/2009 6:39am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Howdy everyone!
We hope you are all enjoying the odyssey through seasonal produce. I have been hearing that children have been eating their vegetables, and that warms my heart.  

Here is what this week's share included:
 
1. Napa Cabbage. This is a really  tender, sweet cabbage that doesn't need to be cooked for long, if at all.  I would add it to a stir-fry at the last minute or just salt some thinly sliced cabbage, then add a little citrus.  Chris thinks it could add texture to a salad - indeed we were served a simple salad of Arugula and sliced Napa with some shredded carrots and Newman's olive oil and vinegar dressing - superb. One friend added it to her roll-up sandwich for some good crunch. 

2. Kohlrabi. Green this time. very nice roasted. we did a side by side test with kohlrabi and the salad turnips. The kohlrabi stayed very firm with oven roasting. the turnips are much better cooked quickly on the stovetop in butter. Peel it, then roast it or just cut it into raw veggie sticks.  One member made a grated salad with kohlrabi, beets, and (i believe she said carrots). the dressing was the juice and zest of one lemon, and I can't remember exactly the other ingredients. surely some salt, olive oil, a touch of mayo. she did say dill. Patty - if you feel like sharing - the grated salad is a really good one to have in your repetoire.

3. Arugula. the spicy little mustard green in the bag.  This batch is tender enough to wash, spin, and add to any salad. I think it is very nice with lemon juice, sea salt, and olive oil. chopped and thrown in a mayo or eggs or wilted onto a fresh pizza or into a risotto or with a pasta. In Italy, my favorite train station snack was a piadina, which to me is a quesadilla - but a good combo was mozzarella, arugula, prosciutto.

4. Butterhead Lettuce. One head of silky lime-green leaves. great for lettuce wraps. excellent on burgers or sandwiches and in a salad, of course. Some excellent salads to fall back on are: sliced red grapes, green apples, and goat cheese. dried cranberries, toasted walnuts, and blue cheese.

5. Mizuna. a bunch of kind of feathery looking mustard greens.  I would cut the whole bunch above the band and wash and spin the bunch. I find a creamy dressing balances the flavor best. Check out the recipe I posted for white balsamic vinaigrette.

6. Cherry Belle Radishes. these are tender enough to have raw, especially thinly sliced. try some good buttered bread, topped with thinly sliced radishes and finsihed w/ a pinch of sea salt. or they are good with mizuna.

7. Bright Lights Swiss Chard. a slight change-up in the cooking greens department, chard instead of kale this week. my favorite way to eat chard is to steam it and add a pat of butter while it's still hot, then a few drops of apple cider vinegar. It is also excellent sauteed with olive oil and garlic.  A nice touch for a side dish is to add pine nuts, golden raisins, and just a touch of balsamic vinegar.  A pasta i used to have at the farm I worked at in Oregon was: Carmelized Onions, Wilted Chard, Toasted Walnuts, and Feta.  Slice the leaves thin and add it to an omelette, like spinach.  One note: When cooking you may want to either cut off the stems, chop and add them to start cooking early, or discard them (especially later in the season), or add them to your stock pot.

8. One Pound of Sugarsnap or Snow Peas. Get Snappin'! Although tasty raw, these peas are even better sauteed in a little butter until they are bright green and a little tender. a pinch of sea salt or a dash of soy sauce and voila!
I don't mind sitting for a few minutes snapping the tops and unzipping the string. Sometimes it is nice to sit.

9. A dozen or so Garlic Scapes: same as last week. use 'em whenever you would have  used garlic. I have recently heard of pickling them. One member used them to add a flourish to rice pilaf - just threw them in with the rice, seasoning, and a drizzle of olive oil.

10. Beets. Glorious beets. These are the ones we intended to grow for a good beet root. Last week's batch we planted in clumps hoping to have early bunches of beet greens. I adore beets and they could be the only vegetable I find acceptable to boil, besides potatoes.  You can scrub 'em, boil til fork tender, drain the water, allow to steam with the cover on for a few minutes, then peel (w/ fork and knife if still too hot to handle). serve w/ a pat of butter.  A very nice alternative, when you have more time, or while you are making a different meal is to roast them.  Scrub the skins, don't peel, put in a foil packet on a baking sheet with a drizzle of oil and pinch of salt, wrap the packet up tight and throw in the oven at 400 until done (an hour or so). allow to cool then pop off the skins  - you may want a knife to slice off the top.  diced or sliced, these roasted beets are excellent hot or cold. and especially in salads.  a chopped salad of shallot or finely diced red onion, diced roasted beets, and gorgonzola is super with a balsamic vinaigrette.  goat cheese is another super complement to roasted beets - try it on a salad of arugula.  Al Forno makes a sliced beet and avocado salad, finished with arugula dressed with lemon juice and olive oil.  For a fast side, I sometimes slice the beets raw then steam them - the thinner the slice the faster they steam.  They do take a little while so don't burn the water all out of the pot! Don't forget the tops are delicious. same as swiss chard.

11. Parsley. one of my favorites. strip the leaves off the stem and finely chop. Add to everything. sandwiches, pastas, risotto, eggs, creamy polenta, herb dressings, herb mayo, herb frittata, egg scramble. Alice Waters has a nice recipe for gremolata, which is parsley, lemon zest, and garlic - a wonderful mash for putting on fish or roasted meats.

12. Cilantro. a nice way to make guacamole is to finely dice a red onion, add a pinch of salt, mash w/ a fork (kind of tenderizing the onion) add the juice of a lime or two, mash again. chop the cilantro, throw that in. Cut up several perfectly ripe avocados - if they aren't ripe at the store sometimes you have to watch them for a few days on your counter. I halve them around the pit, make a grid out of the flesh with a sharp knife, then use a large spoon to scoop it all out into your onion, lime, cilantro mix. serve w/ tortilla chips.
We added it (last) to our stir fry of bok choy, carrots, snow peas, garlic, ginger, Napa Cabbage. we made sure not to drench the stiry fry in soy sauce - just enough for a good amount of moisture, then served soy sauce at the table.


 Thank you all for trekking out into the rain for the third week in a row! We have been feeling proud of how the vegetables look and taste and we are delighted to send them to all of your homes each week!
 
Posted 6/17/2009 6:57am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hello Everyone!

It's happened again.  We scanned and foraged in the fields to put together an array of fresh produce for you.

Here is what was in your share this week:

1. 2 Heads of Napa Cabbage. This is a really  tender, sweet cabbage that doesn't need to be cooked for long, if at all.  I would add it to a stir-fry at the last minute or just salt some thinly sliced cabbage, then add a little citrus.  Chris thinks it could add texture to a salad. One work for share add it to her roll-up sandwich for some good crunch.

2. Kohlrabi. Green this time. very nice roasted. we did a side by side test with kohlrabi and the salad turnips. The kohlrabi stayed very firm with oven roasting. the turnips are much better cooked quickly on the stovetop in butter.

3. Arugula. the spicy little mustard green in the bag.  This batch is tender enough to wash, spin, and add to any salad. I think it is very nice with lemon juice, sea salt, and olive oil. chopped and thrown in a mayo or eggs or wilted onto a fresh pizza or into a risotto or with a pasta.

4. Butterhead Lettuce. One head of silky lime-green leaves. great for lettuce wraps. excellent on burgers or sandwiches and in a salad, of course.

5. Mizuna. a bunch of kind of feathery looking mustard greens.  I would cut the whole bunch above the band and wash and spin the rest. I find a creamy dressing balances the flavor best. Check out the recipe I posted for white balsamic vinaigrette.

6. French Breakfast Radishes. long red radishes with white tips. these are tender enough to have raw, especially thinly sliced. Try slicing at an angle to get bigger pieces.  try some good buttered bread, topped with thinly sliced radishes and finsihed w/ a pinch of sea salt.

7. Bright Lights Swiss Chard. a slight change-up in the cooking greens department, chard instead of kale this week. my favorite way to eat chard is to steam it and add a pat of butter while it's still hot, then a few drops of apple cider vinegar. It is also excellent sauteed with olive oil and garlic.  A nice touch for a side dish is to add pine nuts, golden raisins, and just a touch of balsamic vinegar.  A pasta i used to have at the farm I worked at in Oregon was: Carmelized Onions, Wilted Chard, Toasted Walnuts, and Feta.  Slice the leaves thin and add it to an omelette, like spinach.  One note: When cooking you may want to either cut off the stems, chop and add them to start cooking early, or discard them (especially later in the season), or add them to your stock pot.

8. One Pound of Sugarsnap Peas. Get Snappin'! Although tasty raw, these peas are even better sauteed in a little butter until they are bright green and a little tender. a pinch of sea salt or a dash of soy sauce and voila!
I don't mind sitting for five minutes snapping the tops and unzipping the string. Sometimes it is nice to sit.
Enjoy this larger batch, snow peas are coming on next.

9. A dozen or so Garlic Scapes: same as last week. use 'em whenever you would have  used garlic. I have recently heard of pickling them.

10. Beets. Glorious beets. These are the ones we intended to grow for a good beet root. Last week's batch we planted in clumps hoping to have early bunches of beet greens. I adore beets and they could be the only vegetable I find acceptable to boil, besides potatoes.  You can scrub 'em, boil til fork tender, drain the water, allow to steam with the cover on for a few minutes, then peel (w/ fork and knife if still too hot to handle). serve w/ a pat of butter.  A very nice alternative, when you have more time, or while you are making a different meal is to roast them.  Scrub the skins, don't peel, put in a foil packet on a baking sheet with a drizzle of oil and pinch of salt, wrap the packet up tight and throw in the oven at 400 until done (an hour or so). allow to cool then pop off the skins  - you may want a knife to slice off the top.  diced or sliced, these roasted beets are excellent hot or cold. and especially in salads.  a chopped salad of shallot or finely diced red onion, diced roasted beets, and gorgonzola is super with a balsamic vinaigrette.  goat cheese is another super complement to roasted beets - try it on a salad of arugula.  Al Forno makes a sliced beet and avocado salad, finished with arugula dressed with lemon juice and olive oil.  For a fast side, I sometimes slice the beets raw then steam them - the thinner the slice the faster they steam.  They do take a little while so don't burn the water all out of the pot! Don't forget the tops are delicious. same as swiss chard.


Hope I'm not forgetting anything. I love to hear the feedback on what you have done with your share! I did start the recipe blog, so just find a vegetable you want to comment on, and comment back with a recipe! Everyone will be glad you did :)
 
Posted 6/10/2009 10:08am by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

http://whitebarnfarmrecipeblog.wordpress.com

I want all of you to participate and share and learn on our own White Barn Farm Recipe Blog.

We can title the posts with the name of the featured vegetable and then comment back with more ideas, feedback, and other recipes for that vegetable.

bonus points for the simpler, faster, more realistic (yet fantastic) recipes for today's go-go-go land.

Posted 6/9/2009 10:57pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Hello!

Forgive any punchy sense of humor you may encounter, I am beyond tired.
However, i am never to tired to be excited about my vegetables.
I should say, excellent work all showing up for two straight weeks! Thank you for bringing your boxes back!
I haven't mentioned yet, although we never use any pesticides, fertilizers, herbicides, etc.  you should still wash your veggies just to get the dirt off. prevent the crunchy lettuce debacle! we only dunk your veggies to take out the field heat or briefly hose down the roots to shine them up!

now, to the point: This Week's Share included
  1. 1 bunch of Hakurei turnips. They are getting larger. probably better than ever for roasting.
  2. 1 bunch of beet greens with little baby beets. these are mostly for steaming or sauteeing the greens, but you can use the tiny little beets, too. Tender little beets with their tops are good steamed whole, tops and all. then served with butter, which should melt right on, and a pinch of salt. I made a quick salad for lunch the other day with a butterhead lettuce, tiny sliced beets, and then I chopped the stems to make a vinaigrette in the blender.  The general ratio for salad dressings is 3 oil:1 vinegar. and I find the formula that makes a nicely emulsified vinaigrette includes a teaspoon of grey poupon and a diced shallot in the blender, then something sweet (sometimes a tablespoon of jam or fruit, in this case juicy beet stems) then the 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar. I whir that for a few seconds, much to the disruption of my luncheon guests, then follow up with more vigorous whirring as i drizzle in the cup of oil (usually some combo of olive/canola). That's all. adjust with salt, pepper, and sparingly, sugar. beets combine splendidly with goat cheese if you have some on hand.
  3. 1 bunch of Red Russian Kale. This is the cousin of last week's kale, White Russian - see the diversity in your share!!! :) Anyway. Check out the basic cooking greens method I added to the recipes section of the website, www.whitebarnfarm.org . Last night, Chris and I stayed out late in the greenhouse, weighing peas and folding wax boxes and lining them up in the greenhouse, anticipating today's rainy harvest/pack-out session and observing the lack of a roof over our wash station. At 10:30 we came in and realized we should eat some supper. We whipped up this quick kind of Tuscan inspired dish: Creamy Polenta, Sauteed Kale and a Fried Egg finished with Parmigiano. It was truly nourishing. I will add it to the recipes section.
  4. 1 bunch of cilantro. If you don't already love cilantro and know what to do with it, it makes any sort of dish with rice, beans, tomato, avocado, limes, cheese, white fish, onions, scallions, etc. sublime. Chris and I have been enjoying sandwiches and wraps with tuna made with just a dab of mayo, chopped red onion, chopped cilantro, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and olive oil. a few leaves of butterhead lettuce and voila!
  5. 3 heads of lettuce: one large green butterhead, Adriana. one little red romaine, Breen. one little speckled (that is not dirt or disease), Flashy Trout Back. salad time. I suggest washing all your lettuces soon after you get your box. It is best to twist off the core. plunge all the leaves into a deep bowl or sink of cold water, then lift out into a salad spinner (that way the dirt settles down). Spin. Put into a bag, packed loosely and perhaps with a paper towel to prevent any rogue moisture from spoiling the leaves. I use a pristine plastic grocery bag, not expensive ziplocks. I would use the mini lettuces for a mixed greens salad and the butterhead for a more featured salad or perhaps lettuce wraps.
  6. 1 bunch of Easter Egg Radishes. same suggestions as last week. different variety of radishes. If they are too spicy try slicing and sauteeing in butter. I keep hearing more and more about eating radish greens.
  7. little bag of Arugula. it is a little spicy. I find it usually needs some balance. try it chopped on a sandwich. finishing a simple pizza with mozzarella and thin slices of prosciutto melted on. We had leftover steak from the grill the other day and made a big platter with a good bed of arugula, gave it the salt and pepper treatment. sliced the steak and arranged it over the arugula, a little more S&P, then fresh squeezed lemon juice (I use a little mini strainer to catch the seeds as I drizzle on the juice) and finish with good extra virgin olive oil. the final flourish was parmigiano shaved with a peeler on top. The cold steak, oil, lemon juice, and cheese were an excellent balance to the spicy, tender greens.
  8. bag of pea tendrils. children have been eating them raw! my heart is smiling! last year I made a pea tendril salad with feta, cucumbers, and red pepper. dressed with a little olive oil. I have no idea where you are getting those cucumbers and red peppers from, but I must say it was a good salad.
  9. 1 pint sugarsnap peas. kids also tend to eat these like peanuts (would it be more PC to say popcorn?) they are splendid sauteed till bright green with butter, or thrown into a stir fry. i have some vague notion that there may be some classic pairings with mint . . . 
  10. handful of garlic scapes: those green, pungent curly cues. these are the flower buds of the garlic plant. since farmers have to cut them off the plant to encourage energy to go to growing the bulb instead of flowering and maturing seeds, we have come up with wonderful uses for these cutie little garlic whistles, as I've also heard them called. you can chop them up as a substitute for garlic. they could be chopped and thrown into some mashed potatoes to add some garlic zing. they could be featured - you guessed it: sautee w/ butter, finish w/ salt and pepper. you didn't get enough in your share, but they also make a wonderful pesto.
  11. 1 head of bok choy. 
  12. 1 head of Napa Cabbage. dense, white ribbed oval with chartreuse frilly leaves. Chris prefers this raw. it is extra tender and sweet. a very light slaw can be made with this lovely cabbage. it would also do well thrown in at the end of a stir fry. Matt at Chez Pascal in Providence said he made some White Barn Farm Napa Cabbage Cole Slaw to accompany his homemade sausages and dogs at his new hot dog cart and it was selling like hot cakes!
Posted 6/5/2009 5:27pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Here I am sitting under the tent, surrounded by your shares. They are getting quite the deluxe treatment for a freshly  harvested vegetable. cool mist.

We just have three members left to pick up their shares! You all did an excellent job of bringing your own baskets, bags, crates, etc. There is nothing in the take-it-or-leave-it bin. Chris jut got home from an impromptu restaurant delivery to Providence, spurred on by the promise of free hot dogs made by Matt at Chez Pascal. I'm getting a little cool, but I could not be more relieved to see raindrops soaking in to the earth here at White Barn Farm.

Here is what was in today's share:

  • 2 Heads of Lettuce. one green, one red. Greens were either 2 small or 1 large head of Buttercrunch Lettuce. Reds were Red Cross, that stunning red butterhead variety.  The Italians taught me that truly fresh and delicious lettuce is adequately dressed with a pinch of sea salt and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.
  • 2 Bok Choy. super great for stir-fries. excellent sauteed in olive oil with a touch of fresh garlic, ginger, soy sauce and stock. nice with white fish.
  • bunch of Cherry Belle Radishes. bright red globes. i recommend thinly sliced. if you have a mandoline (the culinary, not musical instrument) this is a perfect opportunity to make paper thin slices of radishes served on little slices of good bread with butter and a shake of salt. also good shaved on a salad of mizuna and dressed with white balsamic vinaigrette.
  • bunch of Hakurei turnips. larger white globes. a Japanese salad turnip. mild enough to eat raw, but since you also got radishes this week, I recommend treating them as a starch. sliced and sauteed with butter, finished with salt and pepper. we had a great meal last week of grilled steaks (from our buddy James' Liberty Farm), turnips w/ butter, and turnip greens sauteed w/ olive oil and green garlic.
  • 1/2 pound of Spinach. Treasure this spring treat, folks. it is getting too hot for good spinach to continue. I like my standard greens treatment: olive oil and garlic. Hot tip: after the spinach turns bright green and softens, turn off the heat and tilt the pan, shoving all the spinach to the high and dry side. drain the watery stuff. unless you wanted that moisture for something you were adding it to . . .
  • bunch of Mizuna. fresh-eating mustard green. i like it with shaved radishes and white balsamic vinaigrette. any creamy dressing is usually a good balance to spicy greens.
  • Collards or Kale. generous olive oil in the large pan (I have a really useful cheapo nonstick wok w/ a fry pan handle from an Asian grocery store). Slices of garlic (don't worry about mincing). add salt immediately so the garlic doesn't get too brown. when it starts to smell great add the coarsely chopped kale. When it is bright green and tender, it is done. sop up all the extra oil with good bread. Note: when kale gets more mature the stems can get tough, in which case it is better to strip the leaves off the stems. you can always chop the stems small and start cooking them first. We think this week's primo first-picking kale is still tender.
  • handful of Parsley. Chop and add to anything. salad dressing. pasta sauce. eggs. sandwich. mayo.
  • Pea Tendrils. tender fresh-eating pea tendrils - have as a salad or wilt into a pasta or rice. I made a crazy pasta with the tendrils sauteed with olive oil, garlic, and fresh mint. I boiled penne, drained it and in the pasta pot warmed milk, cream, a little butter, cream cheese, salt, and pepper, added the pasta and cooked tendrils. it was a pretty big hit! 
  • Green Garlic. this is what immature garlic looks like. Strip away any dirty outer layer to reveal a squeaky clean bulbette. a lot like a leek, with a more garlic style flavor. use your imagination. use when you want onion or garlic.
  • Kohlrabi. my most sublime experience with this enlarged stem in the cabbage family was when I had it roasted as part of a medley. my general rule for roasting is: preheat the oven to 400 or 425. chop the veggies (medium cubes or vaguely uniform sized rounds). put right onto the cookie sheet you will bake on. add salt and pepper. drizzle with olive oil. toss with your hands. put in the oven for 10-15 minutes. use a flat metal spatula to flip once, another 10-15 or until fork tender. this goes for all sorts of things to come in your share: turnips, beets, carrots, rutabaga, squash, potatoes.  kohlrabi is also good raw. it can be chopped into sticks for a dip. grated for a sort of slaw or a remoulade sounds good.

I am going to sign up for a blog at blogspot or something. It will be named something like "white barn farm recipe blog" it is going to be a place for all white barn farm vegetable users to share and brag about their recipes. everyone who made something great is encouraged to contribute. fast and simple ones are super. I will post the link on the website. 

The "recipes" page of the website is also a good resource, although I have yet to add one of my own. all the recipes you find at this moment are from other farms that use the same website hosting service as me, Small Farm Central.  I am limited to a certain number so I think the free blogspot site will be best for encouraging the most brainstorming and good-old recipe sharing!

We loved meeting you all today! We are so happy that this journey through New England's season of abundance has begun!

Take care and eat well.

chris and christy at white barn farm.

www.whitebarnfarm.org

 
Posted 6/4/2009 8:21pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.
Saturday June 6, 2009. 10am - 2pm
 . . . will be the first day of our Roadside Stand, open to everyone.
www.whitebarnfarm.org
The location is in the open field across the street from the farm. Pull right off busy 1A and park in the "lot" in the field.

You will see our three white tents over crates full of:
beautiful head lettuces
radishes
three vibrant varieties of kale
collard greens
tender turnips
pea tendrils
parsley
and a few little specialties: cilantro, napa cabbage, kohlrabi, beet tops, thyme. possibly spinach and arugula.
We still have veggie starts. mostly tomatoes. some hot peppers, eggplants, and flowers.
Cut flowers. To celebrate her 30th birthday, Christy will be holding the first roadside stand of the year and arranging the first blooms of the season!
Begin a healthy summer routine and come on by to grab some truly fresh produce for the week!
We look forward to seeing you!

cash and checks accepted.
if you think of it, bring your own bag, box, basket, etc.

p.s. we're opening on Tuesdays, too (3pm - 7pm), beginning June 9 
 
Posted 5/27/2009 10:35pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hello CSA members!

We have been eyeing our crops and it is official: Our first pick-up will be next week. So arrange your plans and get ready for the bountiful weekly routine.

you will be stopping by every week from now until the end of october to gather the fixins for your meals each week!

 

Tuesday members: June 2, 2009. 3pm - 7pm. Pick up your box.

 

Friday Members. June 5, 2009. 2pm - 7pm. BYOBAGS!!! Pack your share into your grocery bags.

 

The CSA pick-up will be under tents (large white canopies) across the street from the farm. Please follow the signs and park in the field. Do not park on the road!!!!

the address of the farm is 458 South St. We live at a private residence, so please be considerate and don't pull into my Grammie's driveway. We will be across the street from the official address. look at the "directions" page of the website, www.whitebarnfarm.org .thank you for understanding!

The first pick-up will serve as an orientation. We will be there to answer all of your questions and guide you through the process. If you are splitting a share, it may be good for all parties to come along for the first share.

We ask that all final payments are made before the first pick-up. We'll try to send a reminder to anyone with a final balance. 

Email if you have any specific questions.

Thank you again for your support. We are feeling excited about sharing the wonderful freshness, beauty, and flavor of the vegetables in our field . . . 

Looking forward to meeting you all!

Chris and Christy at White Barn Farm

 

 

 

Posted 5/14/2009 10:12pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hi there White Barn Farm enthusiasts!

This is a quick plea to assist us in getting the word out to all the gardeners out there who are seeking wonderful seedling varieties and splendidly healthy plants! I am asking each of you to forward this announcement to any of your contacts who may be interested in this event.

White Barn Farm is holding a plant sale across the street from the farm all weekend (May 16 & 17)

9 am  to 4 pm both Saturday and Sunday

details at: www.whitebarnfarm.org

prices and varieties are up on the website!

We seeded more than we needed for the field this year in the hopes that such a fundraising sale may afford us the new greenhouse we constructed this February. That means all of the most flavorful and productive varieties that we love to grow will be available to you this weekend!

We believe that during hard times, you will be delighted to be growing your own groceries. It's time for victory gardens, once again! May your yard emerge Victorious!

The freshness, flavors and stunning beauty are what will get you (and even picky children) hooked!

The location is in the field across the street from the farm (458 South St. Wrentham, MA 02093)       5 minutes from the Wrentham Outlets for all you bargain shoppers out there!

Parking will be in the field (not on the road). Please be cautious pulling on and off of busy 1A. Follow the "in" and "out" signs and the simple white paint marked driveway to parking.

No Public Restroom

Thank you so much for supporting our little farm!

P.S.  Thank you to all of the kind businesses in Wrentham and elsewhere for putting up our beautiful posters, custom made by my dear friend, Heather Willey.  and to all the same and other places that have distributed our little Roadside Stand cards, handwritten by a wonderful friend and textile designer, Soraya Ghazi Lutes.

Thank you: Michael's Deli, Cataldo's Hardware, Tootsie's, Marcia's Sweet Pantry, Wampum Corner Liquors, Kathy's Wampum Corner Drive-Thru, Blue State Coffee on Thayer St., PVD, (brand new) Cafe Dolce in Franklin Center, the new Yoga Studio in the center of Wrentham, Lowe's, Williams-Sonoma, Farmstead Cheese Shop in Wayland Square, PVD, Fiske Public Library


 

Posted 5/8/2009 10:57pm by Christy and Chris Kantlehner.

Hi there farm-supporting team!

Two main points:

1. We are selling wonderful varieties of vegetable seedlings as well as flower and herb starts next weekend: May 16 & 17. 9am-4pm both days. rain or shine. Our idea is: Grow your own organic garden. it is time for victory gardens once again. Let us empower you to grow your own groceries. May your yard emerge victorious!!

 

2. We need help. Garden Playdate, anyone? isn't that even a little more euphemistic than "work party"? there is a certain possibility of a bok choy style reward. Make an appointment w/ Christy: 774-210-0359

Upcoming projects:

seeding, potting up in the greenhouse. (music. chatting.)

mulching the peas. (hauling, sweating.)

cultivating and touching up the mulch on the garlic. (admiring unbelievable beauty. hauling, sweating.)

transplanting celery, celery root, lettuce, and leeks with the Waterwheel Transplanter. (core strength.)

harvesting spinach and pea tendrils for Tuesday's restaurant delivery. (squatting, pinching, washing.)

transplanting perennials into the perennial flower and herb bed. (squatting. getting dirt under the nails.)

seeding the next succession of arugula, cilantro, radishes, and salad turnips. (hoeing, raking, pushing seeders.)

- perhaps with some help with these manpower-heavy projects, christy's brain will be freed up so she can order electric fencing, organic fertilizer, organize more garden playdates, post a detailed inventory of the veggie varieties available at the plant sale, attend to Quickbooks, present the family with a coherent business plan, revisit my insurance policy, etc

yikes! doesn't that make tenderly bunching leaves around young peas sound luxuriously simple and carefree!!!

Call Christy if you are inspired by any of these proposed activities. You are invited to come for a morning, afternoon, or evening shift. No more than 3-4 hours at a time (unless you are really inspired!!). 

We start around 8 am and end around 8:30 pm. so your after work hours work for us!!!

 

Other notes:

We have some new photos up on the website. Go to the farm menu and look at the photos.

 

My best friend Heather made us some very cool art for our Plant Sale Poster and business cards.

Another great friend, Soraya, handwrote us a little postcard-sized flyer for our Roadside Stand.

keep your eyes sharpened around town for a sighting of these works!!

 

We are delighted by every instant of our immersion in nature. The enormous bright orange full moon rising over 1A blew us away tonight as i went to inform Chris that he should stop trellising the peas since it was totally dark out. The light shining through our field pea cover crop gave us joy and energy as my Uncle David generously helped us plant nineteen 120' beds of all different varieties of potatoes Wednesday night. It was so hard to believe that the first part of my day had been spent substitute teaching for a Wrentham elementary 2nd grade class. Crisp white button down, smart skirt, tights!!!! Sunday's activites were purely heartwarming. Saturday was nice: we displayed at Earth Day at Wrentham Elementary with an "identify that veggie seedling challenge" followed by a frantic commute to Providence to waitress. Sunday morning was peaceful and my rock-star younger cousins, Ben and Hannah, arrived early to help us begin to cut the seed potatoes. Ben left for an appointment. I arrived late, after thankfully having a moment to organize and vacuum.  Soon we were making every 5 gallon bucket into a seat as Grammie got into the act, thinning all the lettuce flats, my Uncle David started cutting potatoes, Hannah and Chris were still going strong, and finally Ben reappeared, toting his own cutting board and knife, no less!!! 

 

I am considering writing a blog soon, folks.

Hope this wildly formatted note tides y'all over!

love and peas,

chris and christy

 

p.s. CSA folks: Final Balances are due by June 1.